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23 minutes ago, Ceka Cianci said:

your water heater shouldn't need electricity to run if it's gas.. not unless it has a blower for the flu..

The thermostat and all gas valves in the safety system are controlled electrically.  

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*****ing *****ed up mother *****ers are *****ing the whole *****ing *****ed up ****sucking *****head *****s. And then some.

Cutting in with a rando side comment because I haven’t kept up - I’m tired of all the conspiracy theories behind it, and all the Americans on my feeds (note: I am also an American) pointing fingers at

Welp y'all have been warned before about keeping this thread on topic but it continues to delve into Politics and other off topic subjects. So consider this thread closed. If something similar is star

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6 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

The thermostat and all gas valves in the safety system are controlled electrically.  

It depends on the water heater.. if it's just a basic gas water heater without spark ignition then there is no outside electricity going to the water heater other than what is being sent to the valve from the thermocouple that gets heated by the pilot..

If the pilot goes out the thermocouple cools and there won't be an ignition or gas sent to the burner.

Unless it has other features on it.. if it's spark ignition then yea..

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Although both types have advantages, the electronic ignition is more efficient.   I'm not sure they even make stoves anymore with a standing pilot although they do make water heaters still.  Might be something to think about changing if you do have to get a new one.

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Nope.  The thermostat (an electrical switch) controls the water temperature in the tank.  It the water is too cool, it opens the main gas valve electrically.  If the water is already hot enough, it turns the gas valve down.  A set of electrical safety valves in the gas line determine whether gas pressure is too high (or too low), or whether there has been a power failure, or whether the water tank is empty,  and shut the main gas valve.  More sophisticated water heaters may also have electrical time switches or monitoring systems to report gas consumption remotely.  If your water heater is an on-demand system, a sensor in the water line may detect water flow into the system as a signal to turn on the gas or send current through an immersion heater coil.

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2 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

Nope.  The thermostat (an electrical switch) controls the water temperature in the tank.  It the water is too cool, it opens the main gas valve electrically.  If the water is already hot enough, it turns the gas valve down.  A set of electrical safety valves in the gas line determine whether gas pressure is too high (or too low), or whether there has been a power failure, or whether the water tank is empty,  and shut the main gas valve.  More sophisticated water heaters may also have electrical time switches or monitoring systems to report gas consumption remotely.  If your water heater is an on-demand system, a sensor in the water line may detect water flow into the system as a signal to turn on the gas or send current through an immersion heater coil.

That's not a basic water heater.. A basic water heater has the valve and the thermostat all in the same unit..

 

This is the type I'm referring to..

 

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In as much as gas water heaters do not solely depend on electricity to operate like the electric water heater, some, however, rely on minimal electricity for operation.

Not all tank-type gas water heaters use electricity.

Direct from a plumbing website.

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4 minutes ago, RowanMinx said:

In as much as gas water heaters do not solely depend on electricity to operate like the electric water heater, some, however, rely on minimal electricity for operation.

Not all tank-type gas water heaters use electricity.

Direct from a plumbing website.

Yea, the thermocouple is getting it's energy from the pilot which it sends to the valve.. if the pilot goes out for any reason, it's like cutting the power off basically..

There is electricity, it's just not coming from outside the unit, it's created by the unit..

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21 minutes ago, Ceka Cianci said:

That's not a basic water heater.. A basic water heater has the valve and the thermostat all in the same unit..

 

This is the type I'm referring to..

 

Yep. Mine, just like the above, uses the heat of the pilot light  to keep that valve open via thermocouple.  

There is no (zero) electrical connection from the water tank, or control system, to the house electricity.

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3 minutes ago, Love Zhaoying said:

Yep. Mine, just like the above, uses the heat of the pilot light  to keep that valve open via thermocouple.  

There is no (zero) electrical connection from the water tank, or control system, to the house electricity.

I never thought I would ever have to use this information again after I stopped working for my fathers business.. hehehehe

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Wow - we replaced our hot water heater just after Christmas.   

We might have been able to limp along a bit longer, but it was getting harder and harder to get more than 5-10 minutes of hot water -- and the darn thing was almost 20 years old.

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2 hours ago, Ceka Cianci said:

I never thought I would ever have to use this information again after I stopped working for my fathers business.. hehehehe

Heh... and I never thought I would be looking at a really simple control system like that either.  I forgot how minimal a basic home system can be.   Commercial systems that I am familiar with have layers of safety interlocks to shut things down in case anything goes wrong.  Even the one in my own basement has a blower fan on the vent and a safety interlock on the main valve.  Thanks , Ceka. ;)

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8 hours ago, Ceka Cianci said:

That's why we have all that stuff in it's own room out in the garages of all our buildings.. plus we installed an instant water heating system for our house ,so we don't have a big tank, but a tiny boiler that heats it up really quick.. it's a really nice system..

What kind of pipes did you have in the house, was it galvanized? We made sure we had copper when it was built..

It's not a house. It's a mobile home. The new lines are PEX because copper is too expensive and doesn't travel well if we ever move this thing.

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12 hours ago, Selene Gregoire said:

It's not a house. It's a mobile home. The new lines are PEX because copper is too expensive and doesn't travel well if we ever move this thing.

I have a really wild story that revolves around that tubing and the base board and units.. It's not anything technical..

It's more business than anything..

I'm gonna save it for another time, because I'm eating too much of this thread up about water heaters..hehehe

It's about a business trying to frame someone for embellishment, a murder suicide and the changing over of the only Midwest distribution..

any time I hear Pex or Wirsbo, that story comes to mind..It's a really crazy story too.. I just don't think this is the right thread for it though..

We'll have to randomly do it in another thread or something.. hehehe

 

 

 

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On 1/26/2021 at 10:55 AM, Ceka Cianci said:

your water heater shouldn't need electricity to run if it's gas.. not unless it has a blower for the flu..

I'd just make sure you're not spilling water everywhere down there.

Are you getting hot water still?

Wow, who knew the forum members had such knowledge of water heaters!

Unfortunately, yes, my small cellar area (10x12) that houses my water heater has about 18 inches of water in it. The repair person turned off the  water and gas connected to the heater, so at least I'm not floating away or likely to die in a gas explosion. Now to pump that water out -- called one company that wanted 900 dollars to pump out a very small area, and am now trading messages with my trusted repair guy, Juan, who I'm sure won't charge that much for an hours work!

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22 hours ago, Luna Bliss said:

Wow, who knew the forum members had such knowledge of water heaters!

Unfortunately, yes, my small cellar area (10x12) that houses my water heater has about 18 inches of water in it. The repair person turned off the  water and gas connected to the heater, so at least I'm not floating away or likely to die in a gas explosion. Now to pump that water out -- called one company that wanted 900 dollars to pump out a very small area, and am now trading messages with my trusted repair guy, Juan, who I'm sure won't charge that much for an hours work!

900.00?

Well, you know not to ever call that company ever again for anything.. Especially when there is more than likely some sort of pump at a local hardware store that could do it for  under 50.00.. hehehe

 

 

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57 minutes ago, Rat Luv said:

This is tragic...obviously I don't know anything about the victim beyond the news report but if it's true, it's why some of us get so wound up by all this 'planned-emic' stuff:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-shropshire-55843817

Truly sad. People make their own choices and his cost him his life in the end, and no telling how many he might have infected .

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1 hour ago, Rat Luv said:

This is tragic...obviously I don't know anything about the victim beyond the news report but if it's true, it's why some of us get so wound up by all this 'planned-emic' stuff:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-shropshire-55843817

You'd think the story would have focused on how the hospital released the patient when he must have been so close to death already. Why were they not rushing him up to the ICU?

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Has anyone else noticed that culture surrounding death seems to just suck.

Like I mean, stopping 90 y/o Grandma seeing their kids in case Grandma dies. What do people think Grandma lives for, do they think she is planning to go skydiving? No the only company she gets is her family. What purpose does it serve to survive a virus if you're already on deaths door and just want to live and enjoy the last part of your life?

And like the same with Hospitals where every death is treated as a preventable tragedy, where doctors would rather put people on deaths door through extreme pain/suffering, loss of dignity, where every living moment is a living hell just to keep them alive for another 30 seconds, instead of accepting death and letting them enjoy their last moments peacefully with the people they love?

Not every death has to be tragic, as long as the person has led a full life and come to their natural time, why not just celebrate that they've lived a full life and that you're there with them to give them company in their last moments, than act like it's some horror show that shouldn't be happening?

There comes a point where avoidance of death is actually you know harmful to someones quality of life and I feel like people don't seem to get that which frustrates me. I hope when I'm 90 and in a hospital bed I'm allowed to pass away peacefully rather than having a full on anxiety attack whilst doctors pump $$$ loads of every drug into my veins and everything is going crazy.

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