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Bree Giffen
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5 hours ago, Pamela Galli said:

Okra is a kind of Shibboleth — if you don’t like it, you could be from either north or south, but if you do like it, you are either from the south or have moved there and assimilated. Only about twelve people from the north eat it.

Or I could be wrong since I just made that up. 

I'm from the north (of England) and okra isn't popular here, except with Carribbean communities, and some adventurous Indian takeaways who serve more than just the usual popular "English style" curries like Korma, Rogan Josh and Tikka-Masala. 

25 minutes ago, AyelaNewLife said:

I respect your opinion, but your opinion is wrong :P the correct answer is indeed mayo, but ideally not some supermarket bottle nonsense. Belgian style mayo - if the recipe doesn't involve mustard, it's wrong - is the way to go here.

I use whiskey stones for almost all cold drinks I have at home. Don't care if people judge me, I know I'm right here. Only exception is tap water... for obvious reasons.

 

20 minutes ago, BelindaN said:

Y'know, tomato relish/chutney is nicer than ketchup.

Our favourite lunch/snack is fish finger sandwiches on brown bread with tomato chutney. Mmmm.

I'm dairy-intolerant so I can't have sour cream at all, and mayo is too greasy to be putting on food that's already greasy. I believe mayo on chips is a Dutch invention, but I noticed when I visited Canada it's popular there too.  @Orwar is correct; the proper condiment on chips is just salt and vinegar but I regularly have hot sauce instead (I tend to use hot sauce like other people use ketchup - maybe that's why I think ketchup is too sweet and bland). I'll often have gravy on them instead.

I tend not to add ice (or whisky stones) to any drink; drinks that are too cold make me feel uncomfortable when I'm drinking them. The water straight out of my tap at home is extremely cold (and very nice - Manchester tap water is among the best in the UK) so I let it stand for a few minutes before drinking it. The only exception is during that one week of nice warm weather we have in the mid-year season that pretends to be "summer".

It makes me cringe when I order a single malt Scotch or a cognac in a bar, and the bar-tender asks me if I want ice in it. Good lord no, if I have ordered a decent Scotch or cognac, I want to taste what I'm paying for. Ice is for the cheap house whisky that you don't want to taste. The only thing you should ever add to good Scotch is a splash of warm water; that really lifts the flavours. Drinking it in a Glencairn glass and cradling it lovingly in your hand like a new-born kitten, as you slowly sip it before a roaring log-fire, has the same effect.

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9 hours ago, Rolig Loon said:

And my daughter does not serve okra. She evidently has not been assimilated.  Or North Carolina isn't far enough south. 

She might just not like it.

The premise: If you are Southern you may or may not like okra, but if you do like okra, you are either from the south or assimilated. 

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5 hours ago, Matty Luminos said:

(I tend to use hot sauce like other people use ketchup - maybe that's why I think ketchup is too sweet and bland)

   I do that too. Heinz's chili sauce is generally better at just about everything that ketchup does.

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5 hours ago, Marigold Devin said:

Asparagus is very like okra, and that is the only thing I will never ever eat again.

Ah, that's true but only if it's boiled to a mushy pulp, which is a ghastly fate for any vegetable. Asparagus should be steamed, and only to the point where it starts to become limp enough to puncture with a fork. Properly cooked and then served with lemon juice, vinegar, or hollandaise sauce, it's quite tasty and definitely un-okra-like.

Eggplant, on the other hand ....  🤐

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1 minute ago, Rolig Loon said:

Ah, that's true but only if it's boiled to a mushy pulp, which is a ghastly fate for any vegetable. Asparagus should be steamed, and only to the point where it starts to become limp enough to puncture with a fork. Properly cooked and then served with lemon juice, vinegar, or hollandaise sauce, it's quite tasty and definitely un-okra-like.

Eggplant, on the other hand ....  🤐

Or: sautee asparagus in olive oil or butter with garlic, salt, and lemon, then sprinkle w shredded Parmesan. 

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36 minutes ago, Pamela Galli said:
39 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

Ah, that's true but only if it's boiled to a mushy pulp, which is a ghastly fate for any vegetable. Asparagus should be steamed, and only to the point where it starts to become limp enough to puncture with a fork. Properly cooked and then served with lemon juice, vinegar, or hollandaise sauce, it's quite tasty and definitely un-okra-like.

Eggplant, on the other hand ....  🤐

Or: sautee asparagus in olive oil or butter with garlic, salt, and lemon, then sprinkle w shredded Parmesan. 

Or bake it - but again, only until it is just soft enough to get a fork into it.

My mother served us asparagus out of a can a few times.  I tasted it once and promptly gagged.  I swore it was one of the most vile veggies out there.  When my now husband cooked me dinner on our third date, he steamed asparagus.  I looked at it, almost gagged right then, and tried to figure out how to politely tell him that I did not like asparagus - I did not want to run to his bathroom and puke my guts out.  He saw my face and asked if I'd ever had asparagus before.  I told him that my mother had served it a few times and I'd very quickly decided that I didn't like it because it was too mushy.  He chuckled and said that he had steamed it and that he promised it would not be in any way similar to the mush that my mother had tried to get me to eat.  Cautiously, I tasted it - not so much because I believed him, but I wanted to be polite since it was only our third date and he had put a lot of effort into cooking dinner.  I've been an asparagus lover ever since. Often, in the summer, when asparagus is more available and cheaper, we'll steam 2-3 bundles and then keep it in the fridge as a quick veggie snack.

I've never been able to acquire a taste for okra though. Any and all preparations that I've tried are still just ick.

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The secret to cooking tasty veggies, esp starchy ones, is to cook them quickly, just enough to convert starch to sugar.  Then all veggies are tasty— unless you are cursed with memory of some mushy overcooked slop you were served. 

Or just add a bunch of bacon. 

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25 minutes ago, Pamela Galli said:

The secret to cooking tasty veggies, esp starchy ones, is to cook them quickly, just enough to convert starch to sugar.  Then all veggies are tasty— unless you are cursed with memory of some mushy overcooked slop you were served

I've had to get over my childhood as far as quite a few foods are concerned.  I grew up in a household very limited in money - we were on a few of the government assistance programs.  Canned veggies were much cheaper than fresh or frozen, thus that is what mom served.  There are some things that I can't even look at, let alone contemplate eating - and others that I just had to wait a few years before eating them again.  Most of those things are not so much because they were fixed in an icky way, but because they were served constantly.  When I went to college and moved out of the house, I didn't buy any sort of mac-n-cheese or even ground beef for many, many months (even though that is what most college kids lived on because of budget) - and I think it was a good year before I cooked spaghetti.  These days, I can't even remember the last time I bought a vegetable in a can.

Edited by LittleMe Jewell
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3 hours ago, Alyona Su said:

Pfft. Nothing like the original!

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Bahaha!

I'm always open to trying things I haven't before..

I don't hate ketchup..I just can't have it on the breakfast table.. it's just too early for it to be on there..hehehehehe

The reason I don't have it on the supper table is because ketchup and steak sauce are more to cover up the taste that I worked so hard to create..

Lunch is the middle of the day kind of quick meal where everyone can pretty much have what they want..as long as it's not gross..hehehehe

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12 minutes ago, Ceka Cianci said:

I'm always open to trying things I haven't before..

I don't hate ketchup..I just can't have it on the breakfast table.. it's just too early for it to be on there..hehehehehe

The reason I don't have it on the supper table is because ketchup and steak sauce are more to cover up the taste that I worked so hard to create..

Lunch is the middle of the day kind of quick meal where everyone can pretty much have what they want..as long as it's not gross..hehehehe

Well, if you're drowning your steak with the sauce, you don't deserve the steak. The sauce is supposed to compliment, not overwhelm the steak. A little dab'll do ya. Or put a little on your plate and dip the bites. Again, a little dab'll do ya.

While I will put a little dab'll do ya of ketchup on my hash browns, I don't care what anyone says, ketchup does not belong on eggs! Those hash browns with the dabs of ketchup? That's a breakfast for dinner kind of thing. I prefer my hash browns plain for breakfast. Better yet, some grits with a pat or two or even three of real butter. :D

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3 minutes ago, Pamela Galli said:

BTW  After years of being confused by the Brits calling all kinds of unpuddinglike things “pudding”, a friend explained that what they mean by pudding  is “dessert”. 😳

What we mean by "tea" depends on whereabouts in the country you are. Also "dinner".

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1 minute ago, Pamela Galli said:

BTW  After years of being confused by the Brits calling all kinds of unpuddinglike things “pudding”, a friend explained that what they mean by pudding  is “dessert”. 😳

yorkshire pudding.. black pudding desserts?  we need a native english helper!! :) 

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Just now, Alwin Alcott said:

yorkshire pudding.. black pudding desserts?  we need a native english helper!! :) 

You rang, m'lud?

Yorkies are savoury, puffy little pots of deliciousness that go with your roast dinner. I'm veggie but fill them up with veg stuffing, veg sausages and veg gravy and I'm good to go. I make them in muffin trays. Same batter as toad in the hole.

Black pudding is obviously a literal bloody abomination, but people seem to love it. 

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9 minutes ago, Pamela Galli said:

After years of being confused by the Brits calling all kinds of unpuddinglike things “pudding”, a friend explained that what they mean by pudding  is “dessert”.

That clarification makes sense to me.  When I was younger, my grandfather would look at some creation I had made and would invariably say, "Well, you've made a real pudding out of that."  I always took that to be a bit of a put down.  Now that you mention it, though, he may have been trying to tell me that my work looked like the dessert on the menu.  I should have felt more encouraged.

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Just now, Alwin Alcott said:

it's gross ... we know it here as bloodsausage ... eww..

The very idea makes me queasy but a lot of people seem to love it. As I said earlier, I think I'll go back to wearing a crucifix. They are everywhere and they walk among us like normal people.

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