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Victorian Trees?


Elena Core
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Hello all!! Now with the Victorian theme homes, it seems most of the trees I have are out of place (I'm keeping my beloved fantasy trees in the attic). What trees are you using to decorate your gardens? The only one I've found that seems to working in my backyard is this Wisteria one. I just know about Victorian homes from Literature and a few homes I saw while living in the US, so it might be my lack of knowledge... Thanks!!!

VicTree.png

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Most of my trees are too big for my yard. I think the wisteria looks good. With the gorgeous landscaping the Lindens and Moles have done, I haven’t needed to add a tree. I’ve just been filling in flower beds around the house with the included flowers in the content packs. I have used Heart’s Wildwood maples with the Trads. I would use them with the Vics, since there are a variety of styles that are included.

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I had no idea before I googled it.

Japanese maple, dogwood, wisteria, magnolia and weeping trees. Victorians wanted interesting and colorful leaves in their gardens and liked symmetry. So if you plant one tree on the left to the entrance, you should have one to the right. Clipped/trimmed trees and bushes.

Edit: I am very happy that I got locations with many plants around, so I can spend the Li inside.

Edited by Marianne Little
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Here in the Midwest -- the "heartland" of the US -- Victorian homes are very common and so are poplars (especially cottonwoods), maples, and oaks. Willows too, if you happened to be near a river. Anyone who was building a house here in the late 19th century wasn't going to import a tree from halfway across the country  ( we still don't, actually ). The trees around Victorian homes are whatever is native to the region.

Edited by Rolig Loon
typos, of course
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7 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

Here in the Midwest -- the "heartland" of the US -- Victorian homes are very common and so are poplars (especially cottonwoods), maples, and oaks. Willows too, if you happened to be near a river. Anyone who was building a house here in the late 19th century wasn't going to import a tree from halfway across the country  ( we still don't, actually ). The trees around Victorian homes are whatever is native to the region.

Correct, so pretty much, pick whatever would be local to where you live.

My RL house is a Craftsman but has Victorian elements to it. We have cypress, yews, tree sized rhodedendrum and hydrangea, dogwood, flowering plum and maples, along with shrubs they used; hydrangea, roses, lilac, laurels and barberry. We have an herb garden - they loved those also and of course the usual mish mash of perennials that come back year after year such as peonies. Most are natural to our area - some, imported from other regions but now naturalized because our weather is similar to where they grew originally. 

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22 minutes ago, Elora Lunasea said:

Correct, so pretty much, pick whatever would be local to where you live.

My RL house is a Craftsman but has Victorian elements to it. We have cypress, yews, tree sized rhodedendrum and hydrangea, dogwood, flowering plum and maples, along with shrubs they used; hydrangea, roses, lilac, laurels and barberry. We have an herb garden - they loved those also and of course the usual mish mash of perennials that come back year after year such as peonies. Most are natural to our area - some, imported from other regions but now naturalized because our weather is similar to where they grew originally. 

Thank you all for your suggestions :) Local to me would be olive trees and holm oaks,  not really  Victorian related I'm afraid :)

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For me, identifying the species that fits isn't as difficult as selecting a maker whose style fits in with the mole-scape.  I've had pretty good luck with Little Branch, some with Botanical (yes they still are around!), and some with Felix whatsisname. Much of Reid Parson's work also fits in well, to my eye. 

You have to be a little careful with Botanical and Felix tho, because both have really old product lines that include huge sculpty trees that, no matter how well done, don't seem to fit.

I have been driven to use some sculpty grass when prim count is low, and the occasional sculpt novelty item from the beforetimes.  Don't tell anybody.

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8 hours ago, Rolig Loon said:

Here in the Midwest -- the "heartland" of the US -- Victorian homes are very common and so are poplars (especially cottonwoods), maples, and oaks. Willows too, if you happened to be near a river. Anyone who was building a house here in the late 19th century wasn't going to import a tree from halfway across the country  ( we still don't, actually ).

We've got Victorians all over the USA. I always thought of them as 'San Francisco houses' which... evokes a very different set of trees... I think Eucalyptus (invasive species from Australia but was super common in San Francisco when I was younger). And they were actually imported to here in the mid to late 1800s from literally the other side of the planet... :P

So...

I think it's better to just look around you on the region you're on and match that... because if I put out a pack of Eucalyptus trees on my Victorian it would look like a Victorian home to me... but it would ALSO look out of place with the regions we have... which seem more like they're influenced by foliage of the Southeastern USA.

I kept the 'San Francisco' to the inside of my Victorian and to the graffiti I put on it... and added some SciFi because my mind just syncs the concept of Cyberpunk to 'old meets future' much like my hometown... ;)

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On 12/29/2019 at 5:53 PM, Nika Talaj said:

 Much of Reid Parson's work also fits in well, to my eye. 

You know, I thought I knew pretty much every major, medium, and a bunch of the niche brand names in SL. Clothing, home decor, etc, I've seen so many come across in group chats & deal blogs. (I wonder what else I could fit in my brain instead of all this 🤣) But it wasn't until I moved here and started camming around, looking at others' homes till I saw Reid's landscaping stuff. Went to his store and picked up a few plants! Yay for new exposure!

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