Jump to content

Who is on first??


You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 706 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Recommended Posts

5 minutes ago, Lyssa Greymoon said:

Would it make a difference if the meat robot behind the avatar was a woman who looked more like Mama June than her Taylor Swift avatar and had the voice of Sylvester the cat after a fifty year two pack a day smoking habit?

Your post made me suddenly realize it is impossible these days to be a chain smoker unless you stay at home 24/7 or never go into a public building which you can't avoid doing for long. Sooner or later something is going to require leaving home.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, KateaSL said:

I am curious why someone shouldn't use Second Life as a dating service?  I appreciate and respect that you wouldn't use it to find a relationship, however using it as a dating service is as good a reason as any to use Second Life.  I do understand that this wasn't the initial purpose of the game but it has evolved into it.  In fact 50% of SL is designed around relationships, sex and romance.  I think it would be only natural for some to want to use this as a way to find a RL partner.

I never say "shouldn't" and there's nothing wrong with it. But let us compare the two: SL = mysterious avatar with 100% anonymity; people lie all the time and finding a RL relationship is a lot more miss than hit. Purpose-design Dating Site = A lot more information specific to the type of person it is and what they are looking for, though people lie all the time, they don't do so to the level of our mystery; usually just exaggeration and a lot closer to more hits than misses than with SL.

So I'm not saying people *shouldn't* use SL as a RL relationship-finding source, but that doesn't mean they ought to, either. That's all I'm saying. :)

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, KateaSL said:

I am curious why someone shouldn't use Second Life as a dating service?  I appreciate and respect that you wouldn't use it to find a relationship, however using it as a dating service is as good a reason as any to use Second Life.  I do understand that this wasn't the initial purpose of the game but it has evolved into it.  In fact 50% of SL is designed around relationships, sex and romance.  I think it would be only natural for some to want to use this as a way to find a RL partner.

I know a few who met in SL and got together in RL and though it doesnt matter to me, but some do care that the gender behind the avatar is same as the avatar even if they will never meet.  

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/19/2019 at 2:08 AM, Kweopi said:

Hold your horses cowboy, no one made you the speaker for all people.Don't act like you know what is best for all humanity.   the worst thing you can EVER do to a person with a disability is to treat it as you think it should be treated. I know many people with problems of all kinds, I can even be included in this list in a certain way, and some want to be treated as if they have no problem, but others do not, at least not always.Life is so hard for all people, with problems or not. There are days when I am too tired to wear my big girl pants and I just wanna be cudled, protected, shielded from the real world.and if then, my partner, the real man, as he considers himself, tells me "no, I don't care about your problems, others can get over them", then, damn with him.

a little tip, next time, ask yourself how a disabled person wants to be treated and not treat him/her as you want it to be

Well Ma'am at what exact point did I give the impression I was speaking for ALL people? lol Hardly the case. According to my own beliefs the last man who held that privilege was Jesus Christ and I am not where near his league. Way above my pay grade. lol That being said I stand by what I said. Tell you what though. Don't take my word for it. I am a betting man though. I can bet if you ask around at least 9 out of 10 handicap people will say they just want to be treated normally with the same dignity and respect as a human being that you and I would expect. All the other stuff you referenced that's just being human. That has nothing to do with either being or not being handicap. And last time I checked there certainly ain't nothing wrong with that. ;)

On 8/19/2019 at 3:09 AM, Alwin Alcott said:

or they just don't like to voice ... ánd have to prove nothing to you.
 

not at all, most will hate it you look down on it or patronize, also in behaviour. But if you respect and act in dicrete courtisy and appoach with dignity, nearly nobody will see or experience it as bad. Never met a human in a wheelchair who slaps you with a baseball bat when you offer to help them to go on a steep ramp or a door if you see they have trouble with it .. still pretty clear you help them with their handicap. ( and i don't doubt there are who actually try to slap :)  )

On your first comment your absolutely correct. I do agree. No one has to prove anything. There is nothing wrong with that. There is also nothing wrong with choosing not to enter in to a relationship with someone if they choose not to either. I've never required anyone to prove anything to me with out good reason and if they should choose to inform me I am not important enough for them not to then I also have the right to choose to render them just as equally as unimportant in my life. Which should be fine too. :)

I also agree with the second thing you said as well. Just to me helping someone should be just good common decent human behavior regardless. Someone being handicap shouldn't dictate whether or not one should choose to help a person. It should be done because it is the right thing to do. As for never meeting someone in a wheelchair who'd slap you with a baseball bat for helping you well I can think of a few mean old farts who might. lol You just had better luck then I have had mate. lol :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those of us who live with brain injuries or other disabilities that impact our ability to speak clearly or appear “normal”, Second Life is a rare chance to interact with people *without* the stress of being perceived as abnormal, deformed or mentally less-capable by people who hear slurred speech.

SL can be a little slice of sanity and a chance to “mainstream” that RL denies to some.

My partner knows all about my limitations following a stroke and somehow loves me anyway. People I meet casually in SL and will not interact with outside of friendship have no *need* or special *entitlement* to know.

Its really nice to be mistaken for someone “who doesn’t need a little help”

So not everyone - who pretends to be what they aren’t - is out to maliciously deceive or take advantage of others.

  • Like 9
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/19/2019 at 5:24 AM, Velk Kerang said:

 The worse thing you can EVER do to someone with a handicap is treat them handicap. So cry a river some where else with those accusations lady. Have a nice day. ;)

HELL NO!

The worst thing I get as a disabled person, is being treated as though my disability is irrelevant. Sometimes it is, in some circumstances, though that's not always the case. I can do most things with one hand that you can do with two. Some of those things, I can do only with assistive technology. 

Let me illustrate the difference to you.

EquityVsEquality.png

Able bodied people who say that disabled people should be treated just like able-bodied people are thinking of "equality". But this does not help. What disabled people need is equity; we need whatever we need in order to bring our abilities in line with everyone else. For me, that's gadgets in my kitchen that allow me to chop food with one hand. Or elastic shoelaces. Or "sticky keys" on my computer. Or a prosthetic arm. 

To go back to your example, your friend with hearing loss is lucky that he is able to speak at least a few recognisable words. Not everyone who is deaf is able to do that. For people like that, equity is text chat. 

  • Like 10
  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Matty Luminos said:

HELL NO!

The worst thing I get as a disabled person, is being treated as though my disability is irrelevant. Sometimes it is, in some circumstances, though that's not always the case. I can do most things with one hand that you can do with two. Some of those things, I can do only with assistive technology. 

Let me illustrate the difference to you.

EquityVsEquality.png

Able bodied people who say that disabled people should be treated just like able-bodied people are thinking of "equality". But this does not help. What disabled people need is equity; we need whatever we need in order to bring our abilities in line with everyone else. For me, that's gadgets in my kitchen that allow me to chop food with one hand. Or elastic shoelaces. Or "sticky keys" on my computer. Or a prosthetic arm. 

To go back to your example, your friend with hearing loss is lucky that he is able to speak at least a few recognisable words. Not everyone who is deaf is able to do that. For people like that, equity is text chat. 

I think the point I am trying to make is missed. Which maybe the fault is mine and I am not articulating my thoughts in to type clearly enough which in actuality you basically just clarified for me whether you realize it or not. Were actually on the same page. Firstly my references I am talking about how a person is treated. As you said equality. Now what you call equity I call common sense and good manners. I mean obviously if someone who is handicap needs help then the right thing to do is help them. Now me personally I do it in such a way that it does not look like I am exactly helping the person, but rather in a way they feel as if they are making the accomplishment all on their own. I do this because things people take for granted can be very big accomplishments for someone who has to work hard in order to achieve them.

I also given the background and training that I have had I have the mentality of giving someone a hand up not a hand out. Falls under the whole give someone a fish they eat for a day, but teach them to fish and they eat for a lifetime life lesson. Every handicap is different both mental and physical and believe me I am fully aware of this. My sister was handicap both mentally and physically and when she was alive I pretty much shadowed her like Robot does Will Robinson in the new Lost In Space series. lol My parents were lucky if they even got a moment alone with her. lol From the moment we woke to the moment we slept I was there by her side. Doing something as simple as rolling when we played on the rug in the living room together was a big accomplishment for her. She did it. She made that accomplishment there and it was all hers. That doesn't mean my hand wasn't behind her out of view in case she had problems to be able to catch her or keep her from hitting her head though. I always caught her.

So don't mistake my statements as me saying you shouldn't help a handicap person. I think people in general should always help people handicap or not. I am just saying when it comes to handicap people some times you can help and not always look like your helping, but rather making the accomplishments all their own. Playing safety net and giving someone a sense of independence is preferable to me then making someone feel dependent or incapable.

As for my friend I want to elaborate that he lost his hearing gradually over a course of time. As far as him voicing goes some times he just likes to talk to us and we don't mind having to type to him. He doesn't always voice, but sometimes if he has a lot to say it is easier to get it all out in one verbal conversation. I believe he also uses a speech to text program as well if I am not mistaken. Not always, but a lot of time he gives it a try. I just want to emphasize when he chooses to voice with us it is because he wants to try. That choice is all his and not ours. We respect and honor his wishes on that. He's even introduced us to other hearing impaired people in a similar manner. I know he does a lot of work in that field and honestly he'd be able to better explain that then I ever could. He hit's me up for a chat when he's free and I make myself available if I can and we have a chin wag just like anyone else.

Now I am not someone who is speaking as if I never experienced what it was like because in fact it is quiet the opposite and while not permanent I have had a taste of what it was like to be handicap and disabled as I was temporarily blind for a period due to an accident with oil getting in to my eyes. I can tell you that experience enlightened me as to what blind people go threw. First thing I noticed was all my other sense became more attuned. Hearing, smell, and even touch increased immensely. I can also tel you that while appreciated I did not want help when trying to do for myself. I was able to move around my house and even yard freely with ease with out any special arrangements or compensations made. I was specific about nothing being changed and I navigated by counting steps in my head from one location to the next. And while at the time I didn't feel like it later I realized that was even an accomplishment on my part. What I can remember from that experience most is that I didn't want to be treated any different then anyone else was.

Blind me wanted to be treated exactly the same as normal me. I imagine that is true of most people. So for me personally that is what I do. Handicap or not I treat people with the same dignity and respect as a human being that I would want. And when I am helping someone I don't look like I am doing anything different for someone who is handicap then I would anyone who was not. For example if I will hold a door for a lady, gentleman, or child to walk threw it then I'd do it for someone in a wheelchair. If I'll help a little old lady across the street then I'll do it for a handicap person. If I'll reach the top shelf to hand someone an item then I'll do it for a handicap person. If I will explain to a lady who is not mechanically inclined what her car may need to be fixed in such a way I know she will fully understand it by using relation comparisons then I will spend equally just the same amount of time if not more explaining something to a mentally disabled handicap person. That is not special treatment to me. That is just good manners. And sadly that is something this younger generation is lacking in these days.

Now I won't get started on that note though because these young thundercats now days piss me off. lol Make me wanna jack somebody up and open up an educational can. lol Anyway I hope I have relayed my thoughts a little better if not more clearer this time around. I some times forget that what is clear to me may not always be so clear to everyone else. If ya made it this far thanks for reading my book. lol Hope you and everyone else has a great day. ;)

P.S. Thanks for the illustration, but it really wasn't needed though. I may seem some what unorthodox to the untrained eye, but I am not a complete moron. I do have some educational background among my life experiences and most importantly common sense. My comprehension skills haven't left me yet. Old. Not obsolete. lol Nice photograph though. I am sure others will find it helpful. lol :)

Edited by Velk Kerang
Corrections.
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are about to reply to a thread that has been inactive for 706 days.

Please take a moment to consider if this thread is worth bumping.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...