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Would you play SL classic?

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36 minutes ago, TDD123 said:

It' s safe to say I will not rely on your expertise concerning software, hardware or other delusions you might have.

Well I wouldn't want to use any of the software applications either if their all going to run up my CPU and GPU. This is perhaps where the disconnect happens as well because Video Games use CPU and GPU to run. Software Applications do not.

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Posted (edited)

Hmmn.. No.

Wulfie Reanimator may explain to you why.

 

I better shut up.

Edited by TDD123

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Just now, Haselden said:

Well I wouldn't want to use any of the software applications either if their all going to run up my CPU and GPU. This is perhaps where the disconnect happens as well because Video Games use CPU and GPU to run. Software Applications do not.

So software applications are magic? Everything running on a computer uses the CPU. If it displays something (not via printer) then it's using a GPU of some sort. Either you're being intentionally obtuse or you really should learn how computers work.

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7 minutes ago, Haselden said:

Well I wouldn't want to use any of the software applications either if their all going to run up my CPU and GPU. This is perhaps where the disconnect happens as well because Video Games use CPU and GPU to run. Software Applications do not.

everything on your computer uses your graphics card and your CPU if they display on your screen your lack of knowledge about technology is overwhelming

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13 minutes ago, Haselden said:

Well I wouldn't want to use any of the software applications either if their all going to run up my CPU and GPU. This is perhaps where the disconnect happens as well because Video Games use CPU and GPU to run. Software Applications do not.

I'm just guessing, but I think the disconnect is actually somewhere in the left cerebral cortex.

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1 hour ago, Haselden said:

Web browsers are Software yes, but a software applications  take up less resources and not using GPU while running. Whereas Second Life and Video games are Software implemented by hardware. Meaning they're running off some sort of engine to maintain data and transfer it to your PC's CPU and GPU. For example, when firestorm is running it will take up 80%-90% of your computers GPU much like other standard video games.

All software are applications that use GPU and take up some level of resources. Your operating system does that. Without GPU, we'd all still be running DOS.

And no software runs on anything without hardware either.

Photoshop takes up decent resources, too.

Just because it uses the tech behind video games does not make it one.

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Adam Spark said:

Without GPU, we'd all still be running DOS.

 

GERROFF MY LAWN, YOU GUI'd SNOTNOSE !! 🤬

 

*grmblDOSwasallwehadthosedaysandmouse.comwasnotawebsitebutanappthatwastedconventialmemorywhichwasonly640kbbecausemicrosoftdecidedthatitwasallwewouldeverneedtorunsoftwareappllications.**grmbl

Edited by TDD123
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1 hour ago, Haselden said:

Well I wouldn't want to use any of the software applications either if their all going to run up my CPU and GPU. This is perhaps where the disconnect happens as well because Video Games use CPU and GPU to run. Software Applications do not.

You're so far off the mark it's not even possible to explain how all this works without directly challenging your fundamental understanding.

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30 minutes ago, Adam Spark said:

Without GPU, we'd all still be running DOS.

Technically ..... DOS is hardware accelerated. The hardware at the time just happened to be focused on displaying characters at specific rows and columns, various high rez modes and colour depths limited by clock speed and available ram.

Recommended youtube rabbit hole https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7rce6IQDWs

 

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11 hours ago, Haselden said:

Well I wouldn't want to use any of the software applications either if their all going to run up my CPU and GPU. This is perhaps where the disconnect happens as well because Video Games use CPU and GPU to run. Software Applications do not.

You talk total and utter tosh....ever heard of cuda? Why do you think bit coin miners need lots of gpu's....a lot of software apps use gpu's without having any graphics content at all.

You are spouting drivel about SL and you obviously know less about technology than the average politician

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42 minutes ago, KanryDrago said:

You talk total and utter tosh....ever heard of cuda?

I even have it's documentation ... IMHO it's crap - I much prefer openCL which runs on NVIDIA and on other producer's GPUs ... and those crypto miners might be forced to switch to FPGA boards at some not so distant point in the future... I really hope they will bethus making those boards more widespread - this Kitty wants to get it's paws onto some VHDL toys...

But concering software... yeah, just because it's not graphics does not mean it is not running on the GPU... any massive parallell integer operation might perform better over there - depending on your card massive parallell float operations might as well.

12 hours ago, Haselden said:

... because Video Games use CPU and GPU to run. Software Applications do not.

You might want to look up the term software in a dictionary... ;)

 

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Posted (edited)
On 7/14/2019 at 2:52 PM, Caerolle Llewellyn said:

the wild and fun place that SL was back in the late 2000-aughts.

Ok, so . . . what has changed? Because something certainly has.

I've been thinking about this. When I joined almost exactly 11 years ago (I hope someone has the rez day cake on order!), the problem wasn't finding social places: it was choosing from among the wide variety available. To people like me (and, I think, you) for whom the social element of SL was most important, the "late 2000-aughts" were a kind of Golden Age, I think. I eventually settled into three -- a really popular "coffee shop," the activist/NGO/educational community, and the forums (with their in-world component, the Forum Cartel). But the coffee shop went offline in 2009, the activist community (although still present) began to fade substantially as the SL hype died down, and the forum community has evolved and become less in-world oriented than it once was.

There has been a major shift in the culture of Second Life over the past seven or so years: it is no longer nearly as sociable as it once was, and I don't know the reason. Part, of course, is maybe simply that concurrency has dropped, and maybe that has taken the platform below a sort of "critical mass" required to sustain in-world communities -- but the community-driven culture I am pretty sure predates the rapid expansion of SL in 2007-2009.

Voice hasn't impacted social relations the way I once feared it might: I actually can't remember the last time I ran into someone in-world using it.

The advent of mesh has made creation a much more specialized thing than it once was: people build in-world much less than they used to, and the community of creators has shrunk drastically, and that may be a contributing factor for some communities?

And when I go to many popular places now, the chat and interactions aren't happening in open chat: they are happening in IM. So, where clubs used to be great places to meet people and participate in a larger community, they are now frequently unnervingly silent, despite still being jam-packed with avatars. Maybe the shift from open chat to IM parallels the social media shift from relatively open community-oriented apps like Facebook, to closed chat apps such as WhatsApp?

And finally, most of the "communities" that I am still a part of are no longer so anchored in an in-world locale, with the result that interactions within larger groups tend to happen in group chat, with most of the participants not actually being physically in proximity to each other. Why?

I'd love to know what happened. I still enjoy the social aspects of SL: I have a pretty large circle of friends (a surprising number of whom remain from the "old days"), and I'm almost never without someone to talk to when I'm in-world, but I do very much miss community. And the "wildness" and "fun" that you speak of was a function of those communities: the really crazy, exciting stuff was seldom one-on-one, but was almost always generated by a larger group of friends.

Edited by Scylla Rhiadra
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32 minutes ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

And finally, most of the "communities" that I am still a part of are no longer so anchored in an in-world locale, with the result that interactions within larger groups tend to happen in group chat, with most of the participants not actually being physically in proximity to each other. Why?

An immediate example that comes to mind is voice. SL voice is terrible quality compared to Discord and the like.

Similarly, Discord lets people stay connected even while they are unable/unwilling to get on SL. It allows the community to stay connected and interact with other activities besides SL.

Not to mention Discord has an easier way to create/manage bots and roles (group titles) for whatever niche your community needs.

Most chat programs these days also make it much easier to share pictures/video since they tend to embed them into the chat so you just see it right away without having to click a link and leave the window. (Handy even if you have multiple monitors, especially if you're busy with something.)

Moving to a group chat strengthens individual friendships at the cost of overall sociability in SL. Nevermind that the SL playerbase is different from that of early 2000.

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2 minutes ago, Wulfie Reanimator said:

Nevermind that the SL playerbase is different from that of early 2000.

Everything you've said makes sense, but I'm most interested in this.

How has it changed, do you think?

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37 minutes ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

I'd love to know what happened. I still enjoy the social aspects of SL: I have a pretty large circle of friends (a surprising number of whom remain from the "old days"), and I'm almost never without someone to talk to when I'm in-world, but I do very much miss community. And the "wildness" and "fun" that you speak of was a function of those communities: the really crazy, exciting stuff was seldom one-on-one, but was almost always generated by a larger group of friends.

Things have evolved, that's for sure.  It's not easy to point a finger at what's changed, though, or to explain what the drivers have been.  I think we're all being swept into the parable of the blind men and the elephant, each seeing a part of the whole but through a different lens. 

Like you, I fell rather quickly into the NGO/educational community when I joined, because that was the hook that brought me into SL in the first place.   As I have told many people over the years, I came here on a dare. I was told that worlds like SL were going to be the educational platforms of the future.  I didn't believe it, but agreed to come take a look.  It didn't take long to confirm that I was right, but by that time I was deeply wrapped up in an educational community here -- one of the few that didn't collapse as Linden Lab dropped offering educational discounts in 2010-2011.  We had a strong, vibrant community until around 2014, when the original crew started burning out and when external funding for our projects dried up.  Most of us have scattered now and many have left.  

My experience could be read as a tale about a world in decline.  There has certainly been a lot of hand wringing about it. Other residents have watched through their involvement with role playing communities, hunts, gaming, real estate development, and other common pursuits in SL and can tell similar but very different stories.  I can't see a common thread to define what's changed everywhere in SL, but we've all seen changes in our own corners of the world. 

Far from seeing these as signs of a collapsing world order, though, I'm impressed by SL's rather healthy ability to adapt to change.  I'm optimistic because we don't all have the same reasons for being here.  As we change personal interests, we don't have to leave SL to find new ones.  We're not all playing the same "game" and this is not a "one size fits all" world. I've reinvented myself a couple of times, and many of my friends have too.  New people keep coming.  Concurrency is not dramatically different now from what it was a decade ago.  I'm fascinated by the surge of excitement about Bellisseria, which has a lot of people involved in decorating, boating, photography, and social activities.  As long as there are venues like this where  people can rediscover themselves here, SL will be in good shape.

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Posted (edited)
41 minutes ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

Everything you've said makes sense, but I'm most interested in this.

How has it changed, do you think?

I'm too young to have been around in early SL to say for sure, but I have also seen most communities, SL, gaming, and not, to have adopted either Discord or Telegram. It's like you said, social media didn't exist to the extent back then as it does now. Not as many people walked around with a group chat in their pocket. Teamspeak, Skype, MSN, or AIM weren't even comparable.

The people who were on SL in the early days have adapted, so SL doesn't need to be as big of a social thing for them. I've also seen a lot of people explicitly say that they just log into SL out of habit rather than necessity.

Edited by Wulfie Reanimator
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32 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

a lot of people involved in decorating, boating, photography, and social activities.  As long as there are venues like this where  people can rediscover themselves here, SL will be in good shape

Something I always want to be a part of but never allowed. 

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1 minute ago, Selene Gregoire said:

Something I always want to be a part of but never allowed. 

What do you mean? Why not?

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41 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

I was told that worlds like SL were going to be the educational platforms of the future.  I didn't believe it, but agreed to come take a look.  It didn't take long to confirm that I was right, but by that time I was deeply wrapped up in an educational community here -- one of the few that didn't collapse as Linden Lab dropped offering educational discounts in 2010-2011.  We had a strong, vibrant community until around 2014, when the original crew started burning out and when external funding for our projects dried up.  Most of us have scattered now and many have left. 

Similar to my experience, except it was an activist/NGO community with connections to education, rather than an educational community per se. I myself actually burned out towards the end of 2011, and left for a couple of years. The community that I'd been part of and worked for struggled on, slowly losing energy, until about 2014 or so . . . although the sims and the groups still exist, and I still send out occasional notices to them. But, really, it's pretty dead now.

 

45 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

Far from seeing these as signs of a collapsing world order, though, I'm impressed by SL's rather healthy ability to adapt to change.  I'm optimistic because we don't all have the same reasons for being here.  As we change personal interests, we don't have to leave SL to find new ones.

This is a good point. For me, the social element is still there; it's just a different kind of social culture. And, to replace the building I used to do (although I still do a bit), I've taken up photography as my creative outlet.

The very fact that I came back in October, and have stuck around, suggests that you're right: there remain new things to discover here.

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4 minutes ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

What do you mean? Why not?

I've always been the kid no one wanted around. I never knew why. Hell even the other kids didn't know why. And it has continued throughout my adult life. I must just have been too different from the white kids.

As for Bellisseria, LL has made damn sure I'll never be able to afford premium.

I've always been on the outside, looking in.

 

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1 minute ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

The very fact that I came back in October,

Best not mention that I returned in October as well. Someone will get the idea that I'm your alt... or something. :P

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1 minute ago, Selene Gregoire said:

I've always been the kid no one wanted around. I never knew why. Hell even the other kids didn't know why. And it has continued throughout my adult life. I must just have been too different from the white kids.

Well, you've become a very prominent and important member of this community, in the forums. And, for what it's worth, there is, should you want to explore it, an in-world component of that, through the Forum Cartel group?

 

2 minutes ago, Selene Gregoire said:

As for Bellisseria, LL has made damn sure I'll never be able to afford premium.

I'm not Premium either, but I've been exploring and playing around a bit in Bellisseria. There are rez zones all over the place for vehicles, including boats, as well as (I think) free rezzable bikes? And of course social areas and beaches that are open to anyone. No one has ever told me to "go away" when I was there . . . (although, maybe someone reading this will decide now is the time to do so!)

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2 minutes ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

I'm not Premium either, but I've been exploring and playing around a bit in Bellisseria. There are rez zones all over the place for vehicles, including boats, as well as (I think) free rezzable bikes? And of course social areas and beaches that are open to anyone. No one has ever told me to "go away" when I was there . . . (although, maybe someone reading this will decide now is the time to do so!)

This is yet another good point.  Like you, I have never been a Premium member and don't see enough personal benefit to entice me to be one now.  However, I am fascinated by Bellisseria as an environment. Even though I have no desire to live there -- I have my own private estate -- it's a great place to explore.  I have visited many times as a mermaid to swim its waterways and marvel at the sights.  I thought I had lost my zen for exploring in SL years ago, but this has opened up a new corner of the world for me -- quite literally.  Again, it's evolving features like this that give me hope for SL.

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2 minutes ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

Well, you've become a very prominent and important member of this community, in the forums. And, for what it's worth, there is, should you want to explore it, an in-world component of that, through the Forum Cartel group?

No, I haven't. Better to face facts. I joined the group some time ago. Not much goes on that I see. And the breakfast thing is held too early on a Sunday for me.

Quote

I'm not Premium either, but I've been exploring and playing around a bit in Bellisseria. There are rez zones all over the place for vehicles, including boats, as well as (I think) free rezzable bikes? And of course social areas and beaches that are open to anyone. No one has ever told me to "go away" when I was there . . . (although, maybe someone reading this will decide now is the time to do so!)

See, that's what makes it so hard to understand. I would be the first one someone would say "go away" to and they wouldn't even have a reason or excuse. 

The fact is, I was "cast out" as a baby and have been an outcast ever since.

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