Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
bbkeh

Max Performance graphics on Firestorm

Recommended Posts

I am a keen firestorm user however I lost some of my settings due to a laptop change.

I currently have an Alienware with the Nvidia GTX 1060

I basically don't care about heat, I just want 30-40 FPS without lag

Anybody have any tips, what should I check and uncheck

thanks

Bea

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you want no lag?  it's not going to happen, but to help eliminate some of the lag you get,  disable shadows,  you will gain a jump in fps,  also the draw distance.  I find 128m to be the maximum I'm willing to do, otherwise I'm drawling anything and everything.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know the constraints of sims etc, all I wish to do is make sure I am using my graphics card to the fullest

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, bbkeh said:

I basically don't care about heat

I really hope that you realize you can and likely will burn out your power supply if you don't pay attention to the HEAT situation.  You can also burn out your motherboard if your power supply goes.  Research is your friend. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Chic Aeon said:

I really hope that you realize you can and likely will burn out your power supply if you don't pay attention to the HEAT situation.  You can also burn out your motherboard if your power supply goes.  Research is your friend. 

3 year full warranty + cool pad.

anybody have any setting tips?

 

Edited by bbkeh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

- view range: in a club it needs to cover the distance to the walls, when you admire the landscape while sailing you will need more. View Range has a major effect on your fps.

- avatars: set the number of impostors. How many depends on your hardware. I personally don't render hi-arc-avatars avatars over 200k. So this avatars already fall out of the calculation then. The # of Impostors have a major effect on your fps - well - in a crowded area - if you are alone ... not 😎

- shadows: add alot of geometry and they cost quite some fps. I reduced the shadow resolution to 0.5 - that reduces the shadow quality but increases the fps significantly. Reduced shadows are much better than no shadows. 😎

- fog: in some scenes fog can noticeable reduce fps. If you need all you can get activate a fog free windlight.

All other settings are not worth to mention - minimal or no effect. Tweaking 20 little things may sum up to a few fps though. May be different on different hardware of course. For me catznip is not faster than FS (in high load areas and under 60 fps). I see same fps if I apply same settings.

There is no setting for all situations - so make a few setups and switch depending on where you are and what you are doing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You cannot utilize your GPU to the fullest. Firestorm simply doesn't offer options that are capable of using your GPU to its maximum.

Options that can ramp up GPU utilization quickly:

  • The old original high quality depth of field at maximum resolution and high blur will quickly use 100% of your GPU. (I'm unsure whether FS has the old DoF, probably not)
  • Screen Space Reflections is a pure GPU shader and will drive GPU utilization up quickly if you turn up the resolution. (Black Dragon exclusive)
  • Volumetric Lighting is a pure GPU shader, although dependent on shadows it is a purely GPU dependent effect and will also utilize your GPU a lot if you raise its resolution. (Black Dragon exclusive)

To clarify which options do not utilize your GPU (only little)

  • Shadows: Most of their impact comes from them being CPU dependent, not GPU, the GPU only does little when it comes to shadows, most is done by the CPU.
  • Draw Distance: Is mostly just CPU, you are essentially just tossing more draw calls at your CPU which it can't handle and will fall behind your already under-used GPU.
  • Avatars: Same as draw distance.
  • Fog: Is a pure shader effect but doesn't impact your FPS at all, its calculation is super fast and so easy on your hardware you could essentially run it on a pocket calculator.

In short, all options that just toss "more of the same stuff" at the Viewer are going to the CPU and will likely reduce your framerate with your GPU idling. Everything done post process in a shader is run on the GPU, settings counting into this are: Screen Space Ambient Occlusion, Depth of Field, Screen Space Reflections, Volumetric Lighting, Exodus's Post Processing (Tone Mapping, Color Correction), shadow maps being translated and layered onto your world, half of which Firestorm doesn't even possess.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After a bit of sleep i'm back to explain further when shadows actually ramp up GPU usage.

In the very last part of shadow rendering they are being translated and applied to the world, that's the part thats being run on the GPU, before it does these calculations however it does a simple check against lighting. IF the point in question is on the opposite side of where the sun is coming from, lets say you pulled the sun down all the way to where it is below the terrain and the moon lighting hasn't yet risen enough to be shown, shadows would simply "early out" with a "we're facing away from sunlight, we MUST be in shadow", there's no need to calculate where the shadow is if the point in question isn't in sunlight, which means we can save the rest and assume the point is shadowed. Any and all surfaces pointing away from the sun are automatically considered shadowed, this saves a lot of processing power with high resolution shadows and/or far shadow distances. However there is a point... specifically a sun angle which is a super edge case, you can put the sun in such an angle that the shader doesn't yet consider everything in shadow but still have the entire world shadowed due to the sun being in such a low angle that everything has a shadow drawn across, this is the post apocalyptic scenario you never want in this very case possibly every single point needs to calculate shadows fully, check against the shadow map and decide how shadowed something is, this scenario can often be achieved in very foggy or low-sunlight-high-ambient-fog windlights which basically eliminate any sunlight and have the entire world being shadowed, this will make the shadow calculation run rampant which is why @Nova Convair here might see such a huge framerate impact with "fog". Note that said shader is running on the GPU so a good GPU will negate most of this but also keep in mind that said shader will do a crazy amount of extra texture lookups which might be costly and comparisons against 4 shadow maps, possibly 2 at the same time (where shadow maps overlap) or more in possibly unseen weird instances, this combined with higher shadow resolution (usually in all Viewers except Black Dragon coming from higher screen resolution) can quickly massivey inflate the amount of times this calculation is run and can possibly quickly tax the GPU to the point it can't keep up anymore.

I thought about moving shadows from pipeline into shaders to transfer more load from possibly CPU to GPU but i haven't exactly looked into the pipeline shadow calculation that much, most of it however should be just calculations which the shader could do too... i wonder if it was worth moving those into shaders.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting the best performance and the best quality render is a balancing act. Personal preference is a big factor in deciding which balance is right.

Much of what has been written about optimizing for SL is old and out of date. Once upon a time Anti-Aliasing (AA) was a huge factor in performance. With newer video cards like the 1060 and new ways to handle AA it is mostly a non-issue. I can't see a difference in FPS between 2x and 16x AA on my 1060. Nor do I see a perceptible visual difference. So, these days I tell people to try AA at max and 2x to see what it does to their performance and to look to see if they can see a difference.

I wrote Graphics Tweaking for SL sometime ago (2010) when I was trying to squeeze all I could from an older computer. That article explains what the various settings do.

When I built my newer computer (2016-17) I went through the process of figuring out what is best for my current machine. In the process I came across NVIDIA's recommendations for running SL, NVIDIA 2016 SL Settings. These are a combination of Windows setting and NVIDIA setup. Part of it is setting up a gaming profile for SL as there are none included with newer video cards.

NiranV gets into the meat of what loads the viewer. The two articles are the long story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...