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Hmm, this is a funny one.  If you are from Tokyo it translates as 'egg rice cracker'.

This first:

The first three Hiragana characters reads as 'tamago' which is translated to 'egg' -  the last four Hiragana characters read as 'senbei' which is translated to 'rice cracker'.   

In Japan, it's literal translation may vary with region.  In east Japan, i.e., Tokyo, senbei is understood as 'rice cracker'.  In the west (everywhere else in Japan [insert smiley face]) senbei is understood as 'egg cracker.'

Let's talk about 'senbei' then.  There are two different methods of making senbei: egg OR rice.  They are 50/50 in it's production.   

So, if I was in Tokyo, and I read the Hiragana above, I would think it was 'egg on a rice cracker.'  Or why would someone be redundant (and use all those hiragana characters) to mean egg egg cracker?  No one ever writes 'rice rice cracker'.

But, what do I know; Japanese is my third language.  I am more literate in Brooklynese; in NYC we use SALTINES.

/me noches on some senbei.

 

 

 

 

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Haha, love your answer storm!
That means "rice cracker shaped cracker which doesn't contain rice but egg".
Tamago senbei is usually made from egg and wheat flour.

Senbei is a word like "cake" e.g. birthday cake, fish cake, a cake of soap.
If you have a thin old mattress, you can call it as Senbei Futon.

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