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how can i put three textures on one prim?


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You can apply 1 texture per each face of a prim.  So a basic box can have 6 textures, one on each face.  Depending on what you are doing, you can fold, taper and flatten a box so that one side is actually made up of 2 faces.  I've never done three but thinking about it, it should be possible.   Tapering one axis of a box and then flattening it should put 3 faces on one side

Your other option is to combine the 3 textures you want into a single texture using any good graphic editor and apply it to one side of the prim.

--Cinn

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You can apply 1 texture per each face of a prim.  So a basic box can have 6 textures, one on each face.  Depending on what you are doing, you can fold, taper and flatten a box so that one side is actually made up of 2 faces.  I've never done three but thinking about it, it should be possible.   Tapering one axis of a box and then flattening it should put 3 faces on one side

Your other option is to combine the 3 textures you want into a single texture using any good graphic editor and apply it to one side of the prim.

--Cinn

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You can have one texture per face as mentioned

One way to making a prim with 3 faces facing the same way is to take a BOX prim,

cut it in half so the cut faces are in the XZ or YZ plane,

then hollow it and make it flat by decreasing the the y or x measure to minimum

You end up with two cut faces and one 'inside' face all facing one way

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There was a very good compendium og all the interesting things like this you could make. but I can't find it. I recall these simple ones though...

Best for three faces is: cube; taper [X=1.00, Y=0.00]; slice [b=0.00, E=0.65]; dim[X=1, Y=1, Z=0.001]; all rest default. This way you can sdfjust the slice to get any ratio of inner to outer panels.

Five is more interesting. Prism path cut [b=0.20. E=0.080]; hollow [70.0]; dim[X= 0.01, Y=1.15, Z=1.00]; all rest default.

Picture shows the panels at the top and the same object stretched to show structure at the bottom. Just stretch the non-thin axes more to get bigger panels.

tryptych-pentych-1.jpg

To make the exposed textures on the five-face one exactly square, and to fit textures, use hollow = 66.7 and the following texture repeat/offsets [repU, repV, offU, offV], going left to right along local Y axis: [2.5, 1, -0.25, 0]; [1, 1, 0, 0]; [15.0, 1, 0, 0]; [1, 1, 0, 0]; [2.5, 1, 0.25, 0].

pentych.jpg

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