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Seeking roleplay tutor/mentor


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If you're good, patient, and dedicated, I suppose I could possibly pay you my weekly non-premium stipend (a bit higher since I'm an old account). I have some hangups about roleplaying and need to explore them with someone open-minded. Maybe, in the end, I'm no good at it, but at least you'd have helped me figure that out. Also need someone to practice with, before I think of applying to one of the many RP places we have here in SL. Hope to find someone like this!

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13 hours ago, Nimue Galatea said:

If you're good, patient, and dedicated, I suppose I could possibly pay you my weekly non-premium stipend (a bit higher since I'm an old account). I have some hangups about roleplaying and need to explore them with someone open-minded. Maybe, in the end, I'm no good at it, but at least you'd have helped me figure that out. Also need someone to practice with, before I think of applying to one of the many RP places we have here in SL. Hope to find someone like this!

I've been a role player for many years, but I wouldn't count myself an expert on the subject. Personally, I would avoid anyone that claimed to be one as hubris since there is always something new to learn. But if you are interested in learning I could help you with the basics, or if you prefer I can suggest other people who are close friends of mine and are always happy to help. And it wouldn't cost you a cent! Repeating Marinathewitch's quote above me, what kind of RP interests you? Maybe you're not sure yet. But even if you don't know, that doesn't matter so much. I've sent you a notecard in world so we can talk more if you like. If not, I wish you the best of luck in your endeavours. I've had many great experiences in RP over the years. I hope you get to experience the same! :) 

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Honestly I'd feel bad about accepting money for something like this. 

Here are 2 pieces of free advise. 

1) Only write about what your character does or says and their body language and expressions. Avoid writing about thoughts as the other characters won't know what you're thinking. This is called meta gaming. 

2) Follow the order people are posting in and start pre-typing your reply as soon as the person after you posts, and add to your post as every one else posts their replies. This way you will include everyone and people won't be waiting 5 minutes for you to post when it's your turn. 

Good luck.

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20 hours ago, brodiak90 said:

Honestly I'd feel bad about accepting money for something like this. 

Here are 2 pieces of free advise. 

1) Only write about what your character does or says and their body language and expressions. Avoid writing about thoughts as the other characters won't know what you're thinking. This is called meta gaming. 

2) Follow the order people are posting in and start pre-typing your reply as soon as the person after you posts, and add to your post as every one else posts their replies. This way you will include everyone and people won't be waiting 5 minutes for you to post when it's your turn. 

Good luck.

This, absolutely. Though I would rephrase #1 like this" Only ever describe what other people would experience through the five senses: see, hear, taste, smell, and touch (feel).

So an example could be that rather than "/me fumes in anger at those words..." a better emote could be "/me's brows furl hard and glare at you from under their eyebrows..."

When I role-play and someone does a though emote ("/me thinks...") then I treat it as spoken aloud. If they protest then I simply state they must have said their thoughts aloud without realizing it since reading minds is not among my skill set. :)

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21 hours ago, brodiak90 said:

Honestly I'd feel bad about accepting money for something like this. 

Here are 2 pieces of free advise. 

1) Only write about what your character does or says and their body language and expressions. Avoid writing about thoughts as the other characters won't know what you're thinking. This is called meta gaming. 

2) Follow the order people are posting in and start pre-typing your reply as soon as the person after you posts, and add to your post as every one else posts their replies. This way you will include everyone and people won't be waiting 5 minutes for you to post when it's your turn. 

Good luck.

Expanding on #2: Following others is easy IF everyone else involved in the role play follows post-order, doesn't jump the queue, post once and leave the scene immediately afterward, and doesn't spam local chat with multi-line posts. Unfortunately not everyone does what they are supposed to. It's good RP etiquette to say all you need to say in one post at a time, be that a sentence or a paragraph, and save anything else you need to say (or forgot to say) for your next post, but not everyone does that either. With more people involved in your scene, the more you'll have to include in your post which yes, can end up being quite long. While people are generally patient with those new to RP (especially if you tell them early in the scene), not everyone is patient. So it's also good practice to tell people where possible if you intend to take more than a few minutes to post.

When it comes to pre-writing; it's a good idea to start doing this when you get comfortable with the basics of RP, but I wouldn't recommend it to a first-timer, or you might start feeling overwhelmed. Instead, learn the basics. Listen to what is spoken, react to what is done or is happening before you, and don't post in a way that impedes on another. By that I mean you only control your avatar and no one else's. More on all this below.

 

38 minutes ago, Alyona Su said:

This, absolutely. Though I would rephrase #1 like this" Only ever describe what other people would experience through the five senses: see, hear, taste, smell, and touch (feel).

So an example could be that rather than "/me fumes in anger at those words..." a better emote could be "/me's brows furl hard and glare at you from under their eyebrows..."

When I role-play and someone does a though emote ("/me thinks...") then I treat it as spoken aloud. If they protest then I simply state they must have said their thoughts aloud without realizing it since reading minds is not among my skill set. :)

I agree 100%, but there's more than it to that. Basically role play posts consist of words and actions, at the very least. But you'd be surprised how many people don't do either, and only write thought-posts - similar to what Alyona said above. Unfortunately not everyone starts thought posts with "/me thinks", but "/me" (basic emote) posts, which can be just as confusing to someone new starting out and still learning the basics. So what are the basics?

 

Any basic role play post starts with an emote: "/me" (minus the " ").

You follow that "/me" with your post. Basic elements of a post: try and have speech, try and "do" something, or "attempt".

So in Local Chat, I would type:

/me walks into the room, and looks around. She smiles wide from ear-to-ear as she sees an old friend. With brisk steps, Rae walks towards the figure dressed in blue. "Hi!" she calls out, hoping to be noticed.

That's a very basic post. It involves dialog, action, and something for the other player to react to: my character's wide grin and quick step. IF they choose to! They may also choose to ignore that, and just react to my speech, or be startled by my raised voice or quick step, or anything else they see fit that I have mentioned. The choice is theirs. Then you wait for your turn to come around again, once everyone else involved in the scene has posted (and if you arrive on a scene already in play, wait until everyone else has posted at least once before you reply).

When someone posts, pay attention to what they say and how it is say it. Ignore anything someone "thinks" and doesn't say. Though if you (and your character) are very perceptive, someone can say a lot without speaking a word. Look for non-verbal clues; darting eyes, wringing hands, restless steps, etc. Don't feel obliged to reply to every single thing said to your character, or what your character might have reasonably overheard. Instead, select what parts you think are most important or relevant to you and the scene and reply to that - or your posts could end up very, very long (and some people have short attention spans, and might teleport out rather than wait too long). 

 

Regardless where you play there are THREE basic rules most RP communities adhere to:

DO NOT GOD-MOD/MODE:

When a character features God-like abilities, such as invincibility, mind-reading, super-human strength, etc. Another form is when your character cannot be harmed, doesn't take any blows, is an expert at everything, and doesn't exhibit basic human traits (or the acceptable traits of whatever species you are playing).

DO NOT METAGAME:

When a character uses information they have yet to discover in RP. A common example of this when people you are writing with read your name tag above your avatar and greet you by that name, even though you haven't told them yet in RP, or there's no way for them to reasonably know it.

DO NOT POWERPLAY:

When you control the actions of another without their consent. A simple example of this would be "Your character walks up to the cliff and falls off", or "You feel pain when I snap the chains around your ankle," or "I could see you cringe as I walked towards you." You only control your character, no one else's. 

 

There are other rules: Always use "(( ))" when talking out of character (known as OOC), and emote "/me" when in character (IC) or writing RP. For example:

((BRB. Phone call))

((Sorry, wrong number. Back!))

No breaking/bending Lore (altering the background of the story). No MarySue's/Gary-Stu's (making perfect characters without flaws). Be consistent with events and times (don't change established "facts" to suit your character). Don't grief, spam, or harass, and others.

But learn the basics of constructing a post, adhere to the 3 main rules, and be considerate of the players and the scene and world around you. And one last, and perhaps the most important rule of all, HAVE FUN! Every post is an educational experience with something new to learn every time. :)

 

 

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   Asking for a mentor for role play is like asking for a mentor for improvised drama. They'll basically have told you everything you need to know in a few sentences, and then you just have at it.

   What 'rules' apply varies, and whenever you go to a sim made for RP, you'll most likely have these rules shoved in your face repeatedly. The standard ones have already been covered above - following those rules, and the specific rules of the sim and adhering to the setting is all you need. You can't really be 'taught' how to express yourself, that's something that comes naturally as your experience and confidence increases - and the only way to do that is to, well, do RP.

   RP 'schools' (as in, places who claim to teach you how to role play, not places where you role play that you are in a school) are just as fraudulent as 'model schools' in SL - if they charge you for it, it's not role play, you're being scammed. 

   Really, the best thing you can do is find a venue where you want to role play and just try it out - I could offer to do a few scenes to let you try it out, but, then we'd have to figure out a setting and find a suitable location, and that feels like a bit of an unnecessary effort. If people get pissy about how you aren't up to their elitist standards, just stay clear of them; there's nothing worse in RP than elitist 'experts' who claim to know it all and fulfil their extremely narrow expectations. At that point it just isn't fun, and then the whole thing have missed the point.

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