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Is Secondlife american culture ?


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13 minutes ago, Blush Bravin said:

I just remember the mother of a boyfriend who immigrated from the Netherlands saying, "Holland is so much more than wooden shoes and tulips." That has always stuck with me. 

During our belated honeymoon vacation to Europe in 1993, we greatly enjoyed The Netherlands. The young desk receptionist at Hotel Coen in Delft was hilarious, as was the waiter who served us dinner in The Hague. A colleague of mine was from Amsterdam and very funny, so I had high hopes. The Dutch did not disappoint.

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And that is correct. Second Life is international. SL has a huge US population, but I wouldn't be suprised if the ratio to users from other countries is only at 50% or 60% percent. This would mean tha

America is a small planet revolving around the Earth in geosynchronous orbit. The majority of the indigenous population rarely, if ever, venture beyond their own atmosphere as everything they need is

I am not american and don't speak american english

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I didn't read all posts but... I read things about Texas about California about native american (indians)  etc... and there is no americans here. No SL is not american (us). No no no !!!

Edited by Lureo
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1 minute ago, Alyona Su said:
43 minutes ago, Bitsy Buccaneer said:

No no no, that's fancy dress. Costumes are for swimming.

Sheesh.

;)

Hahaha! Yessss. Wait, wot about birfdaysuits?

Well..... swimmers only wear bathing costumes in the UK.  In the U.S., we wear bathing suits (or our birthday suits), unless we're swimming in some sort of nautical pageant, I suppose.  Then we might wear a costume.  Maybe.  🤔

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11 minutes ago, Rolig Loon said:

Well..... swimmers only wear bathing costumes in the UK.  In the U.S., we wear bathing suits (or our birthday suits), unless we're swimming in some sort of nautical pageant, I suppose.  Then we might wear a costume.  Maybe.  🤔

I get it with "Turn about" and not "turn around" and I get it with "boot" versus "trunk" and things, but a swimsuit being a "costume"!? Hahaha. And I thought only Americans were bastardizing the language. ~laffs~

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2 hours ago, Alyona Su said:

I get it with "Turn about" and not "turn around" and I get it with "boot" versus "trunk" and things, but a swimsuit being a "costume"!? Hahaha. And I thought only Americans were bastardizing the language. ~laffs~

It's more antiquated than bastardisation though, as we know it was in use by 1715. I wonder if anyone's looked into why this sense has had greater longevity for swimwear than other dress.

This older usage would be appropriate for ceremonial regalia and without any sense of derogation. If this older meaning has survived better in other languages, it could easily lead to misunderstandings like the one earlier. Language can be tricky like that.

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1715, "style of dress," but also more broadly "custom or usage with respect to place and time, as represented in art or literature; distinctive action, appearance, arms, furniture, etc.," from French costume (17c.), from Italian costume "fashion, habit," from Latin consuetudinem (nominative consuetudo) "custom, habit, usage." Essentially the same word as custom but arriving by a different path.

It originally was an art term, referring to congruity in representation. From "customary clothes of the particular period in which the scene is laid," the meaning broadened by 1818 to "any defined mode of dress, external dress." Costume jewelry, made to be worn as an accessory to fashionable costume, is attested by 1917. Related: Costumic.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/costume#etymonline_v_19135

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"Fancy" is even older, or to put it more accurately, our earliest surviving attestation is older :) .

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fancy (n.)

mid-15c., fantsy "inclination, liking," contraction of fantasy. It took the older and longer word's sense of "inclination, whim, desire." Meaning "the productive imagination" is from 1580s. That of "a fanciful image or conception" is from 1660s. Meaning "fans of an amusement or sport, collectively" is attested by 1735, especially (though not originally) of the prize ring. The adjective is recorded from 1751 in the sense "fine, elegant, ornamental" (opposed to plain); later as "involving fancy, of a fanciful nature" (1800). Fancy man attested by 1811.

 

fancy (v.)

"take a liking to," 1540s, a contraction of fantasien "to fantasize (about)," from fantasy (n.). Meaning "imagine" is from 1550s. Related: Fancied; fancies; fancying. Colloquial use in fancy that, etc. is recorded by 1813.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/fancy#etymonline_v_1114

In the UK, "fancy dress" and "fancying" someone are very much still in use today.

Edited by Bitsy Buccaneer
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