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Is Secondlife american culture ?


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45 minutes ago, Resi Pfeffer said:

No, i had no clue at all.

So, please take my apologies. Wasnt meant i a bad way at all.

My very limited english vocabulary forced me to use that expression. Whats the better word for it?

you don't need to give apologies, the way how it's taken is in the eye of the reader, not the writer.

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And that is correct. Second Life is international. SL has a huge US population, but I wouldn't be suprised if the ratio to users from other countries is only at 50% or 60% percent. This would mean tha

America is a small planet revolving around the Earth in geosynchronous orbit. The majority of the indigenous population rarely, if ever, venture beyond their own atmosphere as everything they need is

I am not american and don't speak american english

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8 minutes ago, Ethan Paslong said:

you don't need to give apologies, the way how it's taken is in the eye of the reader, not the writer.

In general i agree with you. Especially for the fact in dont take myself and my own culture too serious, as you can see in my last post about the oktoberfest.
But we are just exchanging words here. Sometimes its hard to sense, if something was meant to be mean or not, sometimes someone reads something between the lines, what not even there, as you cant see the face expression of the person who wrote it. And that was a lot of "some" in one sentence :)

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6 hours ago, Resi Pfeffer said:

My very limited english vocabulary forced me to use that expression. Whats the better word for it?

Okay, that's fair. :) A "costume," at least in American English (which is a bastardization of the-rest-of-the-world-English, is for 'pretending' or 'make believe'. What the native Americans and other cultural "costumes" would be called, in this specific case, "ceremonial regalia" or "traditional attire (or outfit, or clothing, etc.)  A Holloween outfit of a pirate or faerie etc. is a "costume". 

But also, context is important - so a European wearing a Japanese Kimono: that could be called a "costume" - but a Japanese Geisha wearing a Kimono would not be a "costume". 

I know, I've probably just made things even more confusing for you LOL

BUT THERE IS THIS: Anyone who takes offense at anything another has innocently said: it's the person taking the offense who has the problem, not the person saying the perceived offense.

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1 hour ago, Zeta Vandyke said:

Seriously wondering, why would her sentence be offensive or stereotyping for you in the context it was used?

I'll repeat this from my previous post - because it's worth repeating: Anyone who takes offense at anything another has innocently said: it's the person taking the offense who has the problem, not the person saying the perceived offense.

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7 hours ago, Resi Pfeffer said:

No, i had no clue at all.
Just wanted to point out the fact that almost everyone has to follow rules, no matter of the society you live in. Sometimes more, sometimes less. And the rain dance came into my mind first, thats why i took it. I also could have written about how a bavarian like me goes to the Oktoberfest to kill some brain cells drinking vast amounts of beer in a colored Dirndl dress, and to throw up behind the tent later on celebrate.
So, please take my apologies. Wasnt meant i a bad way at all.

My very limited english vocabulary forced me to use that expression. Whats the better word for it?

I understand. Apology accepted. Please, try not to do that again.

A better word is regalia.

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2 hours ago, Zeta Vandyke said:

Seriously wondering, why would her sentence be offensive or stereotyping for you in the context it was used?

Her description is an age old stereotype of all First Nations people.

http://blog.nativepartnership.org/rain-dance-correcting-the-myth/

https://lenapeprograms.info/teacher-parent-resources/stereotypes-debunked/

https://everydayfeminism.com/2013/06/common-native-american-stereotypes-debunked/

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39 minutes ago, Selene Gregoire said:

Please, try not to do that again.

I will keep it in mind, but there is no guarantee, me or someone else never ever offends another person another day by accident.
People are very different. While you are absolutely not amused, Zeta laughs about her own stereotypes, like i do, too. 

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Just now, Resi Pfeffer said:

I will keep it in mind, but there is no guarantee, me or someone else never ever offends another person another day by accident.
People are very different. While you are absolutely not amused, Zeta laughs about her own stereotypes, like i do, too. 

Thank you. Keeping it in mind is all I ask. I am all too aware that people from outside the US are not always knowledgeable about such things. That's why I asked if you were aware.

Some stereotypes don't carry the same amount of stigma that others do. But, each one is used, at some point, to ridicule and keep indigenous people "in their place".

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It looks to me like Resi and Selene sorted this out well.

I need to point out something though about comparisons being made between cultural stereotypes -- wooden shoes vs Native raindances are not the same because Natives are sometimes thought to be less-than or inferior due to their customs.
Native Americans were (and still are in some ways) denigrated due to these stereotypes we've placed on them, while we don't think of those from Holland (in past or present) as somehow less-than for wearing wooden shoes. Similar with the gouda cheese reference.
This myth of "the wild injun" or "savage" persists. Native Americans were thought to be less sophisticated and intelligent -- primitive. And some still think they are. So there is a difference in your comparision of stereotypes, and this is crucial to the understanding of why Natives can be offended by certain stereotypes.

Knowing this has made me more sensitive to using cultural references in comparisons. Though some references are made innocently we need to become aware of how they can be offensive just the same.

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2 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

It looks to me like Resi and Selene sorted this out well.

I need to point out something though about comparisons being made between cultural stereotypes -- wooden shoes vs Native raindances are not the same because Natives are sometimes thought to be less-than or inferior due to their customs.
Native Americans were (and still are in some ways) denigrated due to these stereotypes we've placed on them, while we don't think of those from Holland (in past or present) as somehow less-than for wearing wooden shoes. Similar with the gouda cheese reference.
This myth of "the wild injun" or "savage" persists. Native Americans were thought to be less sophisticated and intelligent -- primitive. And some still think they are. So there is a difference in your comparision of stereotypes, and this is crucial to the understanding of why Natives can be offended by certain stereotypes.

Knowing this has made me more sensitive to using cultural references in comparisons. Though some references are made innocently we need to become aware of how they can be offensive just the same.

I agree with all of this except unless you are from a particular culture you may not know that something you think of as benign, perhaps wooden shoes, might in fact be offensive to someone of that culture. We really do walk a tight rope when it comes to knowing the cultural views of others. This means that whenever possible we need to take the time to educate rather than be offended when someone makes a comment. 

In this case, we see a good outcome where people have seen the error of their comment and others have offered education in a respectful manner. 

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3 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

Knowing this has made me more sensitive to using cultural references in comparisons. Though some references are made innocently we need to become aware of how they can be offensive just the same.

I know and I fully agree. But there is also a thing as taking it to far.  Publicly calling someone out on how terribly offensive they are because they just mention a ritual in a perfectly innocent context, (a ritual that is even still practiced these days!) that is just plain silly and being over sensitive or seeking attention on your subject in the wrong way. No need to talk guild into someone who has done nothing to deserve that.

But lets be done with this, no harm was intended or done. Lets get back on feeding the troll who started this subject

 

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1 minute ago, Blush Bravin said:

I agree with all of this except unless you are from a particular culture you may not know that something you think of as benign, perhaps wooden shoes, might in fact be offensive to someone of that culture. We really do walk a tight rope when it comes to knowing the cultural views of others. This means that whenever possible we need to take the time to educate rather than be offended when someone makes a comment. 

In this case, we see a good outcome where people have seen the error of their comment and others have offered education in a respectful manner. 

So true. I did think of that with my wooden shoes reference -- wondered if some from Holland might find it offensive too. My positive feelings about wooden shoes won out since I actually had a pair of them once for a dance recital! They were very cute.

Yes, this whole PC thing has made social interaction a minefield hasn't it?  I have been more and more careful about taking offense, as often the "offender" is innocent and the issues can be sorted out without starting a war if approached carefully.

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5 minutes ago, Zeta Vandyke said:

I know and I fully agree. But there is also a thing as taking it to far.  Publicly calling someone out on how terribly offensive they are because they just mention a ritual in a perfectly innocent context, (a ritual that is even still practiced these days!) that is just plain silly and being over sensitive or seeking attention on your subject in the wrong way. No need to talk guild into someone who has done nothing to deserve that.

But lets be done with this, no harm was intended or done. Lets get back on feeding the troll who started this subject

 

Are you saying that you think I was being overly sensitive or was seeking attention in the wrong way? That isn't how it went down. 

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7 minutes ago, Blush Bravin said:

I just remember the mother of a boyfriend who immigrated from the Netherlands saying, "Holland is so much more than wooden shoes and tulips." That has always stuck with me. 

that's true - don't you dare to forget windmills and camping trailers...

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