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People of Color needed for magazine article


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I have absolutely no reason to doubt your RL skin color. I'm responding because of the two phrases I've quoted.  Since people can pretend to be anyone they want on the internet, including within

@LittleMe Jewell thank you so much for the kind words💖🌹 I totally understand where your coming from but hopefully there is a person that is willing to open up. I'm not in anyway shape or form try

I recommend removing your RL picture.  In SL the larger social norm is not to Facebook things with RL pics, names, emails, etc. Those are things that will likely detract a lot of people from reac

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3 minutes ago, Bradford Mint said:

Isn't white a colour?

What we mean by POC is people with darker skin pigment and black people in general and non-black people with darker skin.That’s what we mean.

Edited by Aiiyaz
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38 minutes ago, Bradford Mint said:

I know what you mean by it, I'm curious as to why the apparent exclusion? Aren't we all just "people"?

I prefer not to colour code people.

For centuries, the stories that we in the West have told each other, passed on down the generations, and celebrated, have overwhelming articulated the voice of white people (and more specifically, white males of a privileged socio-economic status). The poets and novelists we read, the philosophers we study, the historians who have shaped our view of the past -- almost all of them have been, until very recently, white. This despite the fact that colonialism has meant that POC have been full participants, if not always willing ones, in our culture since at least the 15th century.

A lot of those stories derived from the dominant white culture are really great, and worth reading, sharing, and celebrating. I teach some of them: I value them.

But there are other voices, other perspectives, other ways of thinking about the world and our place in it that have been not merely neglected but, to use your word, consciously excluded from our canon of stories. People of colour in particular have a great deal of catching up to do before their very distinctive voices can be properly heard over the dull roar of the overwhelming domination of white perspectives.

There is nothing "exclusionary" about what is being proposed here. No one's stories are being suppressed, no voices are being silenced (as the voices of POC have been for most of the past millennium). This is an enormously positive initiative: it will add new perspectives. We will all be very much the richer for it.

I don't pretend to speak for Meka, who I'm sure can articulate her own views much more eloquently than I have here. But that's my two cents.

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5 hours ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

For centuries, the stories that we in the West have told each other, passed on down the generations, and celebrated, have overwhelming articulated the voice of white people (and more specifically, white males of a privileged socio-economic status). The poets and novelists we read, the philosophers we study, the historians who have shaped our view of the past -- almost all of them have been, until very recently, white. This despite the fact that colonialism has meant that POC have been full participants, if not always willing ones, in our culture since at least the 15th century.

A lot of those stories derived from the dominant white culture are really great, and worth reading, sharing, and celebrating. I teach some of them: I value them.

But there are other voices, other perspectives, other ways of thinking about the world and our place in it that have been not merely neglected but, to use your word, consciously excluded from our canon of stories. People of colour in particular have a great deal of catching up to do before their very distinctive voices can be properly heard over the dull roar of the overwhelming domination of white perspectives.

There is nothing "exclusionary" about what is being proposed here. No one's stories are being suppressed, no voices are being silenced (as the voices of POC have been for most of the past millennium). This is an enormously positive initiative: it will add new perspectives. We will all be very much the richer for it.

I don't pretend to speak for Meka, who I'm sure can articulate her own views much more eloquently than I have here. But that's my two cents.

1492!

hehehe  sorry couldn't resist :D

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On 1/27/2019 at 2:58 PM, Pussycat Catnap said:

I recommend removing your RL picture. 

In SL the larger social norm is not to Facebook things with RL pics, names, emails, etc. Those are things that will likely detract a lot of people from reaching out rather than aid.

It's the "this is my first post and I want to study all of you" that is usually a taboo in pretty much all online and offline communities.

But we're here, in SL. And I'd recommend looking for folks from within the platform itself.

I agree with you, and I think the whole point of SL is missed on the poster. You can be whatever you want in SL and NO ONE has a right to tell you you are wrong.

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8 hours ago, MekaC said:

@Tarina Sewell Thank you for reaching out💟

This was an interview to celebrate people who can trace their lineage to the continent of Africa for Black History Month. If that didn't pertain to then I didn't need ya..sorry😊

I actually can, probably more than you can.  Tell me your markers? Id love to share mine.

Edited by Tarina Sewell
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On 2/1/2019 at 6:58 PM, Scylla Rhiadra said:

For centuries, the stories that we in the West have told each other, passed on down the generations, and celebrated, have overwhelming articulated the voice of white people (and more specifically, white males of a privileged socio-economic status). The poets and novelists we read, the philosophers we study, the historians who have shaped our view of the past -- almost all of them have been, until very recently, white. This despite the fact that colonialism has meant that POC have been full participants, if not always willing ones, in our culture since at least the 15th century.

A lot of those stories derived from the dominant white culture are really great, and worth reading, sharing, and celebrating. I teach some of them: I value them.

But there are other voices, other perspectives, other ways of thinking about the world and our place in it that have been not merely neglected but, to use your word, consciously excluded from our canon of stories. People of colour in particular have a great deal of catching up to do before their very distinctive voices can be properly heard over the dull roar of the overwhelming domination of white perspectives.

There is nothing "exclusionary" about what is being proposed here. No one's stories are being suppressed, no voices are being silenced (as the voices of POC have been for most of the past millennium). This is an enormously positive initiative: it will add new perspectives. We will all be very much the richer for it.

I don't pretend to speak for Meka, who I'm sure can articulate her own views much more eloquently than I have here. But that's my two cents.

Hello Scylla.  The above was very well stated.  Thank you.  However, I think your words work everywhere but SL.  There is no guarantee the 'voice' that is represented is really the voice of a person of color.  As they say: "Your world, your imagination".  I have met more black (and people of other color) appropriation in SL than that of any RL place I have visited.    

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1 hour ago, Storm Clarence said:

Hello Scylla.  The above was very well stated.  Thank you.  However, I think your words work everywhere but SL.  There is no guarantee the 'voice' that is represented is really the voice of a person of color.  As they say: "Your world, your imagination".  I have met more black (and people of other color) appropriation in SL than that of any RL place I have visited.    

Thanks, Storm (and nice to see you here again).

I'm going to agree absolutely that SL is a "special case," and, in fact, said as much on the first page of this thread:

On 1/27/2019 at 12:52 PM, Scylla Rhiadra said:

That said, for reasons laid out by Lil, above, as well as others, you may find this a somewhat fraught project. Documenting the experiences of POC (or women, or members of the LGBTQ community) on a platform that is, in some ways, all about self-representation and exploration is likely to raise some very different issues than you'd face discussing experiences on platforms, such as Twitter, FB, or Skype, that are more securely "anchored" upon "real life" identities. In fact, you may even run across some push back from some who might argue that RL identity is not only irrelevant, but actually out-of-bounds in the context of SL.

Honestly, I have very mixed feelings about the issue of cultural appropriation and representation as a different ethnicity here: while recognizing that is highly problematic in a RL context, I'm inclined, very tentatively, to think that the context in SL is different enough that the same rules don't quite apply. But it's a complicated issue, and I'm not going to pretend that i have a definitive view on the subject.

Meka is explicitly interested in talking to those who are POC (however she defines that for her purposes) in RL, rather than representing them in SL. I think that this is a valuable exercise, but it's very much a different one that approaching SL itself as an anthropologist or sociologist might. In any case, she is aware of the issue, and will have, I assume, some sort of mechanism in place to help ensure that those with whom she is communicating are, indeed, POC.

Is there a possibility of deceit? Well, of course. That's true in RL too. Just ask those who worked with Rachel Dolezal.

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Scylla, again, well stated. And I share these sentiments.  However, SL built on 'deceit';  indicative of the anonymity one seeks in-world.  I can appropriate any race, creed, or color and continue this RP even when a student wants to write a paper.  I, personally, don't find much honor in-world or on this forum.  Just my humble opinion.  

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10 hours ago, Storm Clarence said:

and continue this RP even when a student wants to write a paper.  I, personally, don't find much honor in-world or on this forum.

...and thats why a student should consider, prior to starting their work, if the place they seek out as a resource for information, case studies, interviews and survey participants (or whatever), is still a suitable place for their work, if they have to acknowledge, that they are faced with a high degree of anonymity.

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Thank you all! When I began this I thought it would be a great endeavor but now I see it as a struggle. It was suppose to be simple insight and to me it turned into something way deeper thsn that. Im sorry if I offended anyone but it wasnt my intentions😊

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4 minutes ago, MekaC said:

Really?! Just go to HB and you can find it there 💗

Link is working properly now. Not sure what that higjacking bit was about. Something about Chrome and a cell phone.

Anyway, I have to leave for work now but I will read the article when I get home this afternoon. Looking forward to reading it.

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@MekaC

I read your article. The only two constructive criticisms I have are the first paragraph seems to be worded a bit awkwardly, which in itself is nothing unusual as the first paragraph is always the hardest to write, the second is I spotted ONE typo. 

Quote

Hyphen-Labs

When it comes to business one group to be aware of is Hyphen-Labs. This company is an international team of women creating concepts that challenge all the senses. One of their projects titled NeuroSpeculative AfroFeminism transports its viewers to a virtual hair salon and uses neurocosmotology to each about brain optimization and cognitive enhancement.

I'm pretty sure the word is teach. It's the only word that makes sense. ;)

Going back to the first paragraph, I just want to say that it may appear awkward to me and not others. This sentence is where I ran into trouble:

Quote

Even though African Americans are strong consuming anything tech related us making up less than 20 percent in production shows our weakness behind the scenes.

Perhaps the word "with" should be inserted between related and us? Or is there a phrase missing? Punctuation maybe? I think I know what you were trying to convey with this sentence but I'm not absolutely certain. The uncertain is why I mention it.

Other than that, 

7zi7.gif

Outstanding!

 

I thought Prince giving a standing ovation was appropriate. :D

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