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3 minutes ago, Selene Gregoire said:

You've never had the hair on the back of your neck stand up?  

shiftyeyes.gif.1e85e4a5b1586e843a1758e07debb69f.gif

Me either. My hair has never been that short.

ok, So they make videos to do this to you?

I don't understand why this is a thing that somebody would want to do on purpose.

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Oh I just have one pet peeve. I really can't stand people who are annoyed by either of the following: empty profiles, 'unreadable' fonts, unmatching body parts, flexi prims, AO-less avis, jazz hands,

DJs/hosts teleport inviting their "friends"

I'm not apportioning blame for what's been going on in this forum recently, because that's one thing that appears to start a thread on its downward spiral. Like many of us here - I am absolutely

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12 minutes ago, kali Wylder said:

ok, So they make videos to do this to you?

I don't understand why this is a thing that somebody would want to do on purpose.

Apparently. 

I don't either. Maybe ask the guys who came up with the idea for Jack@$$? I'd trade Jack@$$ for Max Headroom any day.

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18 minutes ago, kali Wylder said:

ok, So they make videos to do this to you?

Depends on your personal reaction to such "tingels". The main aspect is relaxation and letting one's mind unwind to help with sleeping difficulties, for example. Even anxiety relief for some. 

You might put it with things like Yoga, Reiki, meditation and whatsoever... just another sort of stress relief in general.

Personally, I can't stand metal scratching, so I avoid videos with that content. There's plenty to choose from.

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21 minutes ago, kali Wylder said:

ok, So they make videos to do this to you?

I don't understand why this is a thing that somebody would want to do on purpose.

I love ASMR so I'll try to explain, maybe.

Many people don't get the tingles at all. There are all sorts of different triggers, and I didn't think ASMR worked for me until I found the right triggers - hair brushing and mic scratching are my biggies. There are good triggers and bad triggers, too. I cannot stand to hear people making mouth sounds or even whispering in ASMR but a lot of people love it. To me, it's like nails on a chalkboard and it makes my skin crawl. 

Hair brushing and mic scratching, though? Warm tingly shivers followed by passing out fast asleep. It works best with earphones on to shut out anything else and have the sounds right in my ear holes. 

It's just a way to relax. I often listen at night when I'm having trouble falling asleep. 

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5 minutes ago, Beth Macbain said:

I love ASMR so I'll try to explain, maybe.

Many people don't get the tingles at all. There are all sorts of different triggers, and I didn't think ASMR worked for me until I found the right triggers - hair brushing and mic scratching are my biggies. There are good triggers and bad triggers, too. I cannot stand to hear people making mouth sounds or even whispering in ASMR but a lot of people love it. To me, it's like nails on a chalkboard and it makes my skin crawl. 

Hair brushing and mic scratching, though? Warm tingly shivers followed by passing out fast asleep. It works best with earphones on to shut out anything else and have the sounds right in my ear holes. 

It's just a way to relax. I often listen at night when I'm having trouble falling asleep. 

Low voices droning in the background,

My parents quietly conversing in the den with the tv on low.

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48 minutes ago, kali Wylder said:

ok, So they make videos to do this to you?

I don't understand why this is a thing that somebody would want to do on purpose.

It should be mentioned that ASMR 'chills' are pleasant ones - gentle, tingly 'shivering' sensations - and people get them in different places. Mine usually are on the top of my head, or down either side of my back.

As to sounds that I can't bear in ASMR videos, any mouth sounds drive me nuts (I especially dislike lip-smacking) as well as the fast and insistent nail-tapping on things that so many AMSRtists tend to favour. For me it's soft crunchy sounds - such as crushing ice in a glass - that give the tingles.

Some people also get ASMR not from sounds (or not just from sounds), but from 'personal attention' videos. You can find any number of those on YT, from 'fixing you' videos (as if you're a broken android) to giving you a face treatment or Reiki session.

However, some recent ones I've discovered - such as Atmosphere, Goodnight Moon, and Moonlight Cottage ASMR - are astounding in their production values. Atmosphere in particular has blown me away; her videos are like full-on cinematic productions.

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34 minutes ago, Skell Dagger said:

as well as the fast and insistent nail-tapping on things that so many AMSRtists tend to favour

Yes... tapping is awful! Lip-smacking is awful! 

Crunchy ice is a new one for me... I need to give that a try. 

My current favorite channel is ASMR Love by T&P. They do super long videos and don't switch up the triggers, which is something I also hate. I'll be nice and relaxed and suddenly the scritching changes to tapping or something else and the spell is broken. 

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1 hour ago, kali Wylder said:

ok, So they make videos to do this to you?

I don't understand why this is a thing that somebody would want to do on purpose.

because of the feelings it generates, its a pleasure to some people. the goosebump feeling can be exciting for some people when not triggered by fear or well for some people even when triggered by fear such as with bdsm. for some its a release and relaxing. it a refocusing on other things then what is currently bothering you. kind of like pulling the plug on a bathtub of dirty water and watching it go down knowing that all that dirt is now off of you.

it releases different pleasure drugs into the system and helps deal with stress for some people.

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1 hour ago, Lillith Hapmouche said:

I'm just waiting for someone to burst in and cry "don't say triggers! That term is reserved for people with emotional damages and you're discriminating them"...

You just triggered me by mentioning triggers are triggers!!! How dare you!!! :P

You didn't put a 'stinger' warning on your post.. you are just so insensitive to others... :P

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2 hours ago, Selene Gregoire said:

You've never had the hair on the back of your neck stand up?  

shiftyeyes.gif.1e85e4a5b1586e843a1758e07debb69f.gif

Me either. My hair has never been that short.

ASMR is absolutely amazing

 

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Screenshot_1380.png.8a32d666ef3e9bda7b416f1f476bc652.png

This is in wireframe mode. It appears solid.

The avatar complexity is somehow only 106,000 despite a tri count in their socks that would probably be enough to render a  scene in a AAA game.

I'm not shaming the wearer, they probably don't have a clue about this stuff and they shouldn't need to know either. It's the creators of it. I wish we had some good incentives in place to get creators to care about SL performance more.

 

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Posted (edited)

I'd never heard of ASMR. Just been reading about it and watching some videos. I was hoping I'd get the experience...I'm synaesthetic so I thought perhaps that would make it more likely. But it doesn't seem to do anything for me, sadly. I'd love to understand what's going on.

I get hairs rising on my skin and shivers from various stimuli, including the right music or even just a piercing note, but nails tapping a phone or wooden balls knocking together didn't do anything. I wish they would.

Edited by Amina Sopwith
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On 6/7/2020 at 3:42 AM, Lindal Kidd said:

Cut it out, you guys.  You're just getting Dano all hot and bothered.

You KNOW guys are fascinated by girl fights.  They're always hoping that clothes will be ripped off.

What I do?....Wasn't me...wasn't even here....can't prove anything!  😲
"Girl fights" in text are always boring anyhow in the "clothes ripped off sense". I'm not a fan!  

ASMR - Something else that's bollocks! People are probably aware of my quiet dislike of acronyms? That being the case, I had no clue what it was when I went on a voyage of discovery on 'Twitch'. Took me 10 min's to realise I should stop messing with my volume controls, mute everything, and just stay for the copious amounts of cleavage same as everyone else!

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1 hour ago, Amina Sopwith said:

I'd never heard of ASMR. Just been reading about it and watching some videos. I was hoping I'd get the experience...I'm synaesthetic so I thought perhaps that would make it more likely. But it doesn't seem to do anything for me, sadly. I'd love to understand what's going on.

Not everyone experiences it, and for those that do - as you can see from the above brief discussion - they all have different triggers. Some are aural, some are visual. And - for many people - you can't actually trigger them if you deliberately try to; they just happen sometimes. Very few of the deliberate ASMR videos on YT will actually trigger it for me these days, but occasionally I'll be watching something non-related and it'll happen.

My first ASMR experience (although there was no word for it back then and I had no idea what it was) was a long time ago when I was watching some documentary about specific religious rituals. The slow care and attention given to one ritual gave me tingles on the top of my head several times. Watching slow, detailed rituals such as tea ceremonies from China, Japan, and Korea can induce the same feeling.

The vast majority of ASMR you'll see on YT are of the "100 ASMR triggers" kind, and they feature lots of tapping, scratching, whispering, and binaural audio triggers, as well as 'personal attention' roleplays. It can take a long time to identify your personal triggers, and even then they might not work all the time.

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2 hours ago, Amina Sopwith said:

I'd never heard of ASMR. Just been reading about it and watching some videos. I was hoping I'd get the experience...I'm synaesthetic so I thought perhaps that would make it more likely. But it doesn't seem to do anything for me, sadly. I'd love to understand what's going on.

I get hairs rising on my skin and shivers from various stimuli, including the right music or even just a piercing note, but nails tapping a phone or wooden balls knocking together didn't do anything. I wish they would.

I don't find many of the ASMR personal attention roleplay videos to be very good for bringing the tingles and suspect a lot of the people making them don't even get ASMR. They're generally relaxing, but the unintentional ASMR of a good knife sharpening video is way better.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Skell Dagger said:

Not everyone experiences it, and for those that do - as you can see from the above brief discussion - they all have different triggers. Some are aural, some are visual. And - for many people - you can't actually trigger them if you deliberately try to; they just happen sometimes. Very few of the deliberate ASMR videos on YT will actually trigger it for me these days, but occasionally I'll be watching something non-related and it'll happen.

My first ASMR experience (although there was no word for it back then and I had no idea what it was) was a long time ago when I was watching some documentary about specific religious rituals. The slow care and attention given to one ritual gave me tingles on the top of my head several times. Watching slow, detailed rituals such as tea ceremonies from China, Japan, and Korea can induce the same feeling.

The vast majority of ASMR you'll see on YT are of the "100 ASMR triggers" kind, and they feature lots of tapping, scratching, whispering, and binaural audio triggers, as well as 'personal attention' roleplays. It can take a long time to identify your personal triggers, and even then they might not work all the time.

like you most videos on yt do not work, but sometimes a random non asmr video will trigger the response for me. 

you can even trigger it within yourself just by random thoughts or actions. there is no real perfect trigger list or way for every person.

and then you have the problem that once triggered the same action, sound, video may not ever trigger it again.

for some people they can trigger it through mediation and yoga or working out for others that has no effect.

sometimes a personal prophetic video or epiphany will cause it for the one time similar to the. "OMG that makes sense!" feeling.

Edited by Drakonadrgora Darkfold
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Posted (edited)

I've discovered a new peeve, and it's screencaps of avatars who've had 'realistic' smiles/faces pasted on with an app. Seeing caps like that (to me, anyway) is like getting hit in the face with a brick someone wrote the words 'uncanny valley' on. Nothing personal against people who do it, but oh man. It just heebies my jeebies.

Edited by Artair Glendullen
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-pokes her head in, notices the thread is still alive and she's about 20 pages behind, *bleep*'s off for another couple weeks- 😂😂😂

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6 hours ago, Amina Sopwith said:

Are the shivers I get from music or sweet, piercing, perfect notes the same sensation?

From any stimuli like music or ASMR you begin to vibrate in the same frequency along with the stimuli. Check out 'armonica' and 'singing bowls' on Youtube for some really good vibrations!

The activity of the brain is measured by the electric impulses that it creates. These electric impulses can be measured with an encephalogram (EEG) and are calculated in hertzes or Hz.

We experience different frequencies which are dependent upon the state of mind that we are in. If we are tired, afraid, or relaxed, for instance, the frequency changes. These waves of frequency range from very active states to states of deep relaxation.

These electric waves can be categorized according to their speed. The four principal categories are as follows:

  • BETA WAVES – 14 Hz to 20 Hz. Beta waves are found in normal states of consciousness. They are present when a person is engaged in regular activities concerning the outside world.
  • ALPHA WAVES – 8 to 13 Hz. Alpha waves are found in states of light meditation and day dreaming. They become stronger when the eyes are closed. When a person passes from Beta to Alpha waves, the parasympathetic part of the brain takes charge of the nervous system and more nervous signals are sent to the organs and glands, creating ideal conditions for healing. Some mystics refer to this state as “the sacred space”.

The predomination of these waves is associated with increased learning, creativity, and concentration. When we focus on something, the Alpha waves are predominating. Regardless of the activity a person is engaged in, studies show a rise in productivity and a deep experience.

  • TETA WAVES – 4Hz to 7 Hz. These waves are found in high states of creativity and in deep states of meditation. This state is ideal for meditation. There is a disconnection between the body and the mind when this happens which allows for a better concentration into higher states of the self. In this state, there is a deep physical relaxation felt.
  • DELTA WAVES – 5 Hz to 3 Hz. These waves are found in states of deep sleep and unconsciousness, and new studies have shown that these waves appear in deep meditative states as well. There are CDs with Delta waves music which can be a tremendous help for people suffering from insomnia.

One of the characteristics of the different sounds, mantras and songs that are used to reach meditative states is that they all have the same frequency as the Teta Waves, 4 to 7 Hz, or 3.5 beats per minute.

Studies conducted on Shamanic chants, Indian Ragas, and some mantras and Tibetan chants show that they generally have 3.5 beats per minute as well.

Our brain captures and copies the frequencies that it is exposed to. Studies conducted on this subject have discovered that people who expose themselves to this frequency for 15 to 30 minutes a day do not have stress.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Luna Bliss said:

From any stimuli like music or ASMR you begin to vibrate in the same frequency along with the stimuli. Check out 'armonica' and 'singing bowls' on Youtube for some really good vibrations!

The activity of the brain is measured by the electric impulses that it creates. These electric impulses can be measured with an encephalogram (EEG) and are calculated in hertzes or Hz.

We experience different frequencies which are dependent upon the state of mind that we are in. If we are tired, afraid, or relaxed, for instance, the frequency changes. These waves of frequency range from very active states to states of deep relaxation.

These electric waves can be categorized according to their speed. The four principal categories are as follows:

  • BETA WAVES – 14 Hz to 20 Hz. Beta waves are found in normal states of consciousness. They are present when a person is engaged in regular activities concerning the outside world.
  • ALPHA WAVES – 8 to 13 Hz. Alpha waves are found in states of light meditation and day dreaming. They become stronger when the eyes are closed. When a person passes from Beta to Alpha waves, the parasympathetic part of the brain takes charge of the nervous system and more nervous signals are sent to the organs and glands, creating ideal conditions for healing. Some mystics refer to this state as “the sacred space”.

The predomination of these waves is associated with increased learning, creativity, and concentration. When we focus on something, the Alpha waves are predominating. Regardless of the activity a person is engaged in, studies show a rise in productivity and a deep experience.

  • TETA WAVES – 4Hz to 7 Hz. These waves are found in high states of creativity and in deep states of meditation. This state is ideal for meditation. There is a disconnection between the body and the mind when this happens which allows for a better concentration into higher states of the self. In this state, there is a deep physical relaxation felt.
  • DELTA WAVES – 5 Hz to 3 Hz. These waves are found in states of deep sleep and unconsciousness, and new studies have shown that these waves appear in deep meditative states as well. There are CDs with Delta waves music which can be a tremendous help for people suffering from insomnia.

One of the characteristics of the different sounds, mantras and songs that are used to reach meditative states is that they all have the same frequency as the Teta Waves, 4 to 7 Hz, or 3.5 beats per minute.

Studies conducted on Shamanic chants, Indian Ragas, and some mantras and Tibetan chants show that they generally have 3.5 beats per minute as well.

Our brain captures and copies the frequencies that it is exposed to. Studies conducted on this subject have discovered that people who expose themselves to this frequency for 15 to 30 minutes a day do not have stress.

Luna, though ASMR does truly affect people, your explanation is wrong. First, human hearing, at best, covers the frequency range from 20Hz to 20KHz (worse as we age, I last tested myself at 45Hz-6.5Khz in my left ear, 45Hz to 11KHz in my right). Music studio processing equipment also band limits audio to that frequency range and most speakers and headphones struggle to reach even 40Hz, let alone 20Hz. Though Beta wave activity does extend up beyond 20Hz, the bulk of EEG activity (which gives only the very crudest hint of actually underlying neural activity) is well below the threshold of human hearing. So, it's not a 1:1 frequency mapping as you suggest. There might be a rhythm/repetition component as with mantras and chants.

The best explanation I've heard yet for why ASMR does to us what it does is that it sounds like grooming.

https://www.inverse.com/article/51715-do-monkeys-like-asmr-too-or-is-it-just-me

People who only watch the activities that generate ASMR effects often experience them.

Read the Wiki page for ASMR... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASMR

The first published paper on the effect is titled ""It Feels Good to Be Measured: clinical role-play, Walker Percy, and the tingles".

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24375123/

That's only an abstract, but it gets at the same idea, that virtually anything that suggests personal attention gets our... personal attention.

I have, with SL partners, used emoted grooming (hair brushing, bathing, massage, etc) to reduce stress and demonstrate caring. In that case there's nothing to hear and nothing to see, but I'm calling up stored memories of highly tactile and personal experiences.

You'd not be the first person to find "resonance" a compelling explanation for things. That word is deeply embedded in our culture as a description for things that move us emotionally. But, to believe that's what's actually happening is dangerous. Should beliefs such as yours reach political ascendency here, prepare for this...

https://www.wired.com/2008/10/indias-judges-o/

We've a long way to go in understanding how the brain works, and doesn't.

 

Edited by Madelaine McMasters
Grammar!
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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

We've a long way to go in understanding how the brain works, and doesn't.

I'll have to study all that more, thanks. But from a cursory glance it seems you're confusing the abilities of the human ear, yet vibration goes beyond that...the body vibrates, and it's not about what an ear can detect. I know, it sounds strange, but many believe that body 'hears' as well as the ear.

But here we are again, Maddy....*cues in Rupert Sheldrake*  lol        What has been proven at this point in time is not all there is.

I'm not so familiar with all types of ASMR experience but will be taking a look at those, and was really only responding to ASMR experiences which produce a sound that our bodies/brains react to. I was responding mainly to what Amina wrote:

"Are the shivers I get from music or sweet, piercing, perfect notes the same sensation?"

 

Edited by Luna Bliss
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