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What are some of your pet peeves?

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On 12/25/2019 at 4:25 PM, NiranV Dean said:

That makes it just as much real as any other Viewer. Anyone can use it, anyone can do it just like anyone can open preferences and enable/disable graphics features but just because not everyone enables them doesn't mean they are not there. Third Party Viewers are alternatives BECAUSE LL doesn't offer these, if i was in charge these things would be baseline.

The unwillingness of everyone (including LL) is the reason this hasnt happen yet.

Agreed.  Third Party Viewers don't re-define SL graphics, they just grab LL's open source code and set different defaults.  

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Conventions allow us to hear the writer’s voice. Even my elementary students can hear the difference between “There is a tree.” and “There is a tree,” . Simple. Or look at how paragraphs can emphasize and change meaning, depending on where the breaks are. 
 

Simple. 
 

 

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Waking up on New Years Day morning and discovering the internet is down (again). It was down for 6 hours that I know of. What a way to start the New Year.

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Desiree Moonwinder said:

Agreed.  Third Party Viewers don't re-define SL graphics, they just grab LL's open source code and set different defaults.  

That's not true. TPV's are a lot more than "just" code grabs and different defaults.

Exodus at its time did redefine graphics in a major way, it is the reason we have Materials today.

Alchemy, although only privately (and only from hearsay and pictures) offers some extra graphical features including some NVidia Gameworks stuff.

Black Dragon is the only Viewer that "sets different default settings" for graphics in addition to offering a variety of extra features, including those from Exodus.

Firestorm offers Exodus's post processing stack (Tone Mapping, Color Correction and Vignette) just like BD does but doesn't (anymore) feature additional features. They did have Screen Space Reflections but got rid of it due to customer complains.

So if anything Exodus was a major step up and Black Dragon is the closest to a recent "re-definition" of graphics. We are limited of course in how much we can redefine graphics especially as TPV since only those on said TPV would have these graphics and establishing a new default is nigh impossible, even LL doesn't get it done after a decade (so many people still using windlight or legacy rendering even though deferred rendering and shadows have been around for a decade now) and i'm further limited by my lack of skills regarding rendering (and more specifically OpenGL rendering) related coding knowledge. If i had the skills Exodus and Alchemy teams have i'd have "redefined" SL graphics every year anew.

Edited by NiranV Dean
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On 1/1/2020 at 1:16 PM, Pamela Galli said:

I taught both elementary and high school writing. The vast majority of people don’t use conventions because they don’t value what they have written and don’t really expect anyone to read. OTOH, when they have worked for weeks on a story, they want it read. When I hold up their unpunctuated wall of text and ask them if they would want to read it, the look on their face says it all: no way.

Interesting, I never thought of that...people not caring how they write because they don't value their words or expect anyone to read them  :(

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On 1/1/2020 at 2:24 PM, LittleMe Jewell said:
On 1/1/2020 at 1:10 PM, Luna Bliss said:

Am I being too lenient with believing some might lack an important ability? Or am I harsh to expect more?

Not necessarily too lenient, but .....

I think much of it comes from the culture of writing via the phone, using social media apps that often restrict characters.  Some of the social media apps these days seem to consists of entirely a bunch of run-on random thoughts - which also adds to the problem.  Folks just get in the habit of typing that way and the result is what we sometimes see here.

While it might be harsh to expect more, I'm going to do it anyway.

If this is true, it makes me wonder how they complete papers in school...or imagine attempting to write a dissertation!

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On 1/1/2020 at 3:33 PM, Pamela Galli said:

Conventions allow us to hear the writer’s voice. Even my elementary students can hear the difference between “There is a tree.” and “There is a tree,” . Simple. Or look at how paragraphs can emphasize and change meaning, depending on where the breaks are. 
 

Simple. 

This makes me wonder...if you edit a piece of writing a lot which version is the true voice?    :(

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Objects that ask to animate your avatar and trick you into thinking they did by animating properly for you but not anyone else.

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8 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

This makes me wonder...if you edit a piece of writing a lot which version is the true voice?    :(

One purpose of editing -- the main one -- is to allow the reader to hear and understand the writer's voice.

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*cool ad for something you want*
 

comes out 5 days from now!!!

*5 days pass and you have the sneaking suspicion there’s something you wanted to buy, you can’t remember the name of the creator*

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I need a "RL Pet Peeve" thread, so that I have somewhere to come whine about all the things that people do that drive me crazy

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On 1/1/2020 at 10:22 PM, NiranV Dean said:

That's not true. TPV's are a lot more than "just" code grabs and different defaults.

[...] We are limited of course in how much we can redefine graphics especially as TPV since only those on said TPV would have these graphics and establishing a new default is nigh impossible, even LL doesn't get it done after a decade (so many people still using windlight or legacy rendering even though deferred rendering and shadows have been around for a decade now) and i'm further limited by my lack of skills regarding rendering (and more specifically OpenGL rendering) related coding knowledge. If i had the skills Exodus and Alchemy teams have i'd have "redefined" SL graphics every year anew.

I wish somebody with the skills would ifdef-out all the ancient kruft that supports potato class rendering. Anybody running ViewerX is going to get ALM and full shadows; no code checking first how it may render, instead just rendering it already. Got a potato? Awww, too bad, use the Linden viewer.

I wonder how much faster a viewer would render if it could only rendered the best possible way.

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Posted (edited)
On 1/3/2020 at 1:25 PM, Luna Bliss said:

If this is true, it makes me wonder how they complete papers in school...or imagine attempting to write a dissertation!

I think that they struggle a bit . . . but then, previous generations struggled too, with their own preconceptions and writing habits. These are just different ones.

My experience is that students can be taught to write relatively easily, especially if they can become conscious of their own bad habits. The chief difficulties I have, actually, are 1) getting them to unlearn some of the things about scholarly writing they learned at high school (god damn the "5 paragraph essay form": I hope whoever came up with it is burning in the eternal fires at the bottom of Hell), and 2) getting away from the idea that academic writing is supposed to sound "pompous."

A bigger problem than overcoming the impact of social media on writing is combating the way it has changed how they read. Long form writing is really difficult for a lot of them to assimilate now: they're used to reading small, easily-digested chunks, and scanning anything longer than a few paragraphs.

Overall, however, they usually make out fine.

On 1/3/2020 at 1:27 PM, Luna Bliss said:

This makes me wonder...if you edit a piece of writing a lot which version is the true voice?

What makes you think that anyone has one "true voice"? Facility in writing means being able to communicate differently in different contexts, I think.

Edited by Scylla Rhiadra
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4 hours ago, Qie Niangao said:

I wish somebody with the skills would ifdef-out all the ancient kruft that supports potato class rendering. Anybody running ViewerX is going to get ALM and full shadows; no code checking first how it may render, instead just rendering it already. Got a potato? Awww, too bad, use the Linden viewer.

I wonder how much faster a viewer would render if it could only rendered the best possible way.

I tried that. Needless to say the Viewer acts very allergic to that and crashes really quick when there's no fallback. Under normal circumstances there is no need for it but if you're a developer and you're editing shaders and stuff and you ***** up the shader, it will try to step down until it finds a shader level that works, too bad if the shader you are editing is already level 1 and there is no fallback. Poof Viewer gone. I didn't notice any performance improvements, such improvements would be miniscule and are on the same level of optimization as what i've been doing, replacing setting calls with cached settings so the Viewer doesn't actively do slow setting list lookups. I didn't notice any performance improvement from doing so, if anything it would be in the sub-fps range which you cant see anyway because SL's framerate is unstable as hell anyway.

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2 hours ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

A bigger problem than overcoming the impact of social media on writing is combating the way it has changed how they read. Long form writing is really difficult for a lot of them to assimilate now: they're used to reading small, easily-digested chunks, and scanning anything longer than a few paragraphs.

I think this is true. It's not a new problem -- we have always had poor readers, or readers who are impatient with lengthy text -- but it is accentuated by the ways that our fast-paced life emphasizes sound bites over discussion.  For example: quite aside from social media, people are finding it easier and certainly faster to send text messages than to chat on the phone the way we used to just a decade or two ago. True debates and in-depth analysis used to be common on television but are now replaced by 10 second highlights (except on public television/radio).  Social media are simply following the broader trend toward communication by snippets.

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5 hours ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

Overall, however, they usually make out fine.

I'm glad not all hope is lost for young writers, at least among students. Like you I'm more worried about the lack of depth acquired via reading, and what this means for society as a whole. If you don't 'go deep' you're so easily manipulated by outside forces. Of course I have to wonder if this is really a 'young people' problem or one caused by social media, as plenty of older people are unable to go very 'deep'.

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5 hours ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:
On 1/3/2020 at 12:27 PM, Luna Bliss said:

This makes me wonder...if you edit a piece of writing a lot which version is the true voice?

What makes you think that anyone has one "true voice"? Facility in writing means being able to communicate differently in different contexts, I think.

There's a danger in editing any type of art (and I'm considering a forum post as a type of mini-art or expression), in that with the attempt to make the writing clearer for the audience one can easily alter meaning in order to please that audience or appear more acceptable to oneself. I kind of trust raw, unfiltered, sub-conscious expression (with limitations!) more than expressions filtered heavily with the mind, even though I can also feel annoyed an individual made no effort on my behalf via considering their audience. So in this sense I find the less-edited expression more honest or 'true'....the "true voice" (It is often more 'true' because the abstract mind of today has run amok, often divorced from the deeper self and so controlled by it, and totally running the show instead of functioning as a tool of the self). 

Realistically of course one is not more 'true' than the other -- conscious vs unconscious mind -- they have to work together for ultimate expression. Also, if one uses their writing as an authentic type of self-exploration, each change in perception along the way is also a "true voice" for that particular moment.
Personally, when I write a poem or create visual art my goal is to create a feeling or an experience. I really can't do that if my conscious mind is controlling me, and if I attempt to edit the creation later I can easily ruin it unless I can get myself back to the same balance of conscious/unconscious mind that was present during creation.

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3 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

I kind of trust raw, unfiltered, sub-conscious expression (with limitations!) more than expressions filtered heavily with the mind, even though I can also feel annoyed an individual made no effort on my behalf via considering their audience. So in this sense I find the less-edited expression more honest or 'true'....the "true voice" 

Someone once told me that your first reaction to something is what you've been conditioned to think, while your second, more considered response is who you really are. I don't know how well it works as a hard and fast rule, but I thought it was interesting.

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1 hour ago, Luna Bliss said:

 Of course I have to wonder if this is really a 'young people' problem or one caused by social media, as plenty of older people are unable to go very 'deep'.

I don't know that it is actually social media though.  I've encountered folks, old and young both, that couldn't go very deep long before social media was a big thing, back before the internet was huge.

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Lately? Socially awkward penguins who don’t know how to behave in a group setting, and never get better.

I really just need to practice responding kindly and evenly and then limit the *hell* out of that kind of contact.

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14 hours ago, Scylla Rhiadra said:

:::stuff:::

A bigger problem than overcoming the impact of social media on writing is combating the way it has changed how they read. Long form writing is really difficult for a lot of them to assimilate now: they're used to reading small, easily-digested chunks, and scanning anything longer than a few paragraphs.

:::more stuff:::

TLDR, logged inworld

:p

 

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10 hours ago, Amina Sopwith said:

Someone once told me that your first reaction to something is what you've been conditioned to think, while your second, more considered response is who you really are. I don't know how well it works as a hard and fast rule, but I thought it was interesting.

I believe this as someone who successfully writes and makes art. I start raw, unfettered and unfiltered and in the grip of flow. But only in the crucible of editing does the slag of conditioning get scaled away and only with a lot of refining and burnishing does the truth and ultimately the refined clarity of the ‘thing’ get revealed. That’s my experience. I love my editors, my haiku mentor was brutal and fierce, and under his tutelage to ‘edit without mercy’, my poems got good...and in art, my teachers and mentors have helped me learn to refine so much that I can’t even begin to say all of the ways. It’s like they practically gave me new eyes.

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10 hours ago, Amina Sopwith said:

Someone once told me that your first reaction to something is what you've been conditioned to think, while your second, more considered response is who you really are. I don't know how well it works as a hard and fast rule, but I thought it was interesting.

 

11 minutes ago, Fauve Aeon said:

I believe this as someone who successfully writes and makes art. I start raw, unfettered and unfiltered and in the grip of flow. But only in the crucible of editing does the slag of conditioning get scaled away and only with a lot of refining and burnishing does the truth and ultimately the refined clarity of the ‘thing’ get revealed. That’s my experience.

There is a tendency among novice writers, certainly, to think of editing as a sort of fine tuning of what you've already decided to say. My own experience (and what I've been taught about writing) suggests that editing is, in fact, also a crucial part of composition rather than merely correction and smoothing, in that the process of thinking about how you've said what you want to say very often leads to new discoveries and ideas. When I edit (and I write discursively and analytically rather than creatively), I frequently end up with something that is not merely written "better," but that is actually "smarter" and more interesting.

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