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chaosninja7

Roleplay 101

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Thought I write some basics to roleplay that I WAS TAUGHT/GO BY. Again, this is what i use. These are not set in stone, just personally used as my rule-of-thumb.

First, Godmodding.

- Godmodding is having a character who is uber strong and zero weakness that cannot be killed. Everything can die. Even you.

Second, Metagaming.

- Metagaming is using Out-of-Character (OOC) information In-Character (IC). Just because you are aware of the information does NOT mean your character does.

Third. YOU are NOT your character. So don't take crap personal if something happens IC, such as insults.

Fourth....  Your character has limits, whether physical or mental. Example is sprinting for days straight and completely fine and no fatigue. Limits keep you from Godmodding.

 

Thats all I can think of right now. Help it helps.

 

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I think you have godmodding and power-playing mixed up.

What you describe as godmodding is generally known as powerplaying in the circles where I roleplay.
Godmodding is making decisions and actions for other characters, and environment you normally would not be able to influence.

 

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4 hours ago, lavalois said:

I think you have godmodding and power-playing mixed up.

What you describe as godmodding is generally known as powerplaying in the circles where I roleplay.
Godmodding is making decisions and actions for other characters, and environment you normally would not be able to influence.

 

This ^

Godmodding would be, for example:

  • Thorine hits XY straight in the face, making them stumble and fall down

Here, I would decide over XY's body and reactions.

Better roleplaying would rather be (same example):

  • Thorine blows a hit in the direction of XY's face
  • XY can't dodge, gets a full blow in the face, and falls down with a painful yelp

Here, the co-player XY plays along, they decide what the result of my attempt to hit them will be.

Edited by ThorinII
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Role-play is actually very simple:

Always leave a "hook" for the other person to respond to. In general chat that would always be a question. Never emote thoughts, only what any of the five senses can observe: see, smell, taste, feel, hear. Never "Godmod" - which is telling ME what I see, smell, taste, feel, or hear. Rather you should describe it as a source: "A bright light...", "A scent of blood...", "The thickness in the air that one could taste...", A colder than usual breeze blows...", "An electric charge fills the air..."

Never meta-game: using information that was not provided "in-character" - for instance, in my profile I say I like chocolate, don't mention that I like chocolate unless it came out in role-play chat. (And why it's *never* a good idea to put roleplay info into your profile other than what the five senses can observe).

Edited by Alyona Su
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 Following the OP's listing:

Fifth: Do try and make your character more "alive" by giving them character traits and quirks, a personality of some sort. Too many roleplayers I've played with since the creation of my first account in '08 had only a cardboard-like, flat character. Characters with a personality are much more fun to play with - and even can be quite challenging.

 

For example, I once played a High School Principal on an alt, way back a couple years ago. This principal had a severe alcohol problem though. When in the office, he would often pull a bottle of  Whiskey out of a drawer and take a good sip, and he used to chew chewing gum in spite of the school rules so that he didn't smell of booze when he was in the hall or gave a class.  It was a challenge to play him so that he was believable, but it was fun. 😎

There also was someone at this school who played a deaf student, they would only react on the chat when they actually faced the speaker or "saw" them gesticulate. Another student was a depressed person - heavy and very intense to play with (too intense for a few of the former students there), but in the end, the fun in the challenge of roleplay prevailed.

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2 hours ago, ThorinII said:

Fifth: Do try and make your character more "alive" by giving them character traits and quirks, a personality of some sort. Too many roleplayers I've played with since the creation of my first account in '08 had only a cardboard-like, flat character. Characters with a personality are much more fun to play with - and even can be quite challenging.

This is very good. There is a sixth that is almost *always* forgotten in character creation:

A flaw. A weakness. Be sure your character has a flaw or weakness. No one has any fun playing against Superman or Wonder Woman (Okay, they got Wonder Woman RIGHT, so we'll say Supergirl) - the point is you need to have a character flaw to round-out yourself. It could be a dislike or fear of something and also a weakness: cannot swim, claustrophobia, whatever. Make something up and stick to it. Drop hints of it in your role-play. If you're surrounded by good players, they'll catch on quickly. You may not know they have, but they have. >:)

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21 minutes ago, Alyona Su said:

This is very good. There is a sixth that is almost *always* forgotten in character creation:

A flaw. A weakness. Be sure your character has a flaw or weakness. No one has any fun playing against Superman or Wonder Woman (Okay, they got Wonder Woman RIGHT, so we'll say Supergirl) - the point is you need to have a character flaw to round-out yourself. It could be a dislike or fear of something and also a weakness: cannot swim, claustrophobia, whatever. Make something up and stick to it. Drop hints of it in your role-play. If you're surrounded by good players, they'll catch on quickly. You may not know they have, but they have. >:)

For me, it's more interesting to try to discover what those flaws are/might be, than to have hints dropped. Hints tend to be too obvious or way too vague to have a good impact. I've even seen really good RPers completely miss hints that were (to me) real obvious.

Not saying you are wrong as YMMV, just saying dropping hints isn't always a good approach. When you think about it, do people in RL go around hinting at their flaws intentionally? Nope. That's why I avoid doing it in RP. :D

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26 minutes ago, Selene Gregoire said:

For me, it's more interesting to try to discover what those flaws are/might be, than to have hints dropped. Hints tend to be too obvious or way too vague to have a good impact. I've even seen really good RPers completely miss hints that were (to me) real obvious.

Not saying you are wrong as YMMV, just saying dropping hints isn't always a good approach. When you think about it, do people in RL go around hinting at their flaws intentionally? Nope. That's why I avoid doing it in RP. :D

I agree with you!

When I say hints I don't mean "hints". LOL - I suppose a better way to say it would be "others will learn through your 'tells' that they discover as they get to know you". So if I'm claustrophobic and start sweating at the idea of following you into this cave - you'll have to notice I'm sweating, you can ask why but I may deflect somewhat (because embarrassed), yadda, yadda, yadda. But if the situation happens again and I start "acting oddly" then eventually you'll figure it out, etc.

(And this is for other readers to understand my meaning, not you Selene, I already know you already know what I mean.) :D

Edited by Alyona Su
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On 12/7/2018 at 12:31 AM, Alyona Su said:

Role-play is actually very simple:

Always leave a "hook" for the other person to respond to. In general chat that would always be a question. Never emote thoughts, only what any of the five senses can observe: see, smell, taste, feel, hear. Never "Godmod" - which is telling ME what I see, smell, taste, feel, or hear. Rather you should describe it as a source: "A bright light...", "A scent of blood...", "The thickness in the air that one could taste...", A colder than usual breeze blows...", "An electric charge fills the air..."

Never meta-game: using information that was not provided "in-character" - for instance, in my profile I say I like chocolate, don't mention that I like chocolate unless it came out in role-play chat. (And why it's *never* a good idea to put roleplay info into your profile other than what the five senses can observe).

That hook is so important and ties into something I see a lot of this kind of RP101 leave out. Roleplaying is improvisation. In improv, you have to leave the other participants with something to work with. If you aren't adding anything for others to roleplay off of, you aren't contributing to the roleplay.

Additional, I like to make a distinction with in character and out of character, because I have found these terms to be hard to understand in SL. Because the act of logging into SL is thought to be "in character" for so many people, there is an additional distinction that needs to be made.

"Out of character" is pretty easy to understand. It's about real life or you as a person playing SL. Explaining how to rez, planning a story, or doing people management is all OOC.

"In voice," as I call it, is when you are speaking as if you were your avatar. Babies using baby talk is a good example here. Here, you are speaking as your avatar. However, this is simply a filter for many people (myself included). To help with immersion, I try and speak as an 11 year old would (my avatar's age) rather than as an adult in a child's body (unless I have to), whether I am talking RL or not.

"In story" is what people mean when they say "in character." This is when you are talking as your character, as if that character were a real participant in a given roleplay. This is when everything you say is controlled and pertains to the given roleplay.

So using this distinction, me talking like an 11 year old can be in voice or in story, depending on where I am. But talking as my avatar does not necessarily mean I am "in character" and contributing to a given roleplay; I have to actually invest in that roleplay and move to in-story.

Edited by HarrisonMcKenzie
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