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Interestingly I see Australian socialists are on a campaign to discredit and replace the Australian Southern Cross. North or south, east or west, socialists all sing that same sad refrain....

down with western heritage and tradition.

 

 

ADDRESS BY DR. RUPERT GOODMAN 
on the first National Flag Day, 3rd September 1997


 

This is a very special day in Australian history. The Governor-General has proclaimed that 3 September henceforth be known as National Flag Day, this year commemorating the 96th anniversary of the first unfurling of our National Flag on 3 September 1901 in Melbourne, following a public competition which drew 32,000 entries.

This was performed by the Countess of Hopetoun, wife of our first Governor- General and in the presence of our first Prime Minister, Edmund Barton.

This is the complete answer to those who say we never had a flag until 1953.

As you look at the Flag you are looking at 96 years of Australian history in war and peace.

This is the Flag which King Edward VII and the then Governor-General, The Earl of Hopetoun, proclaimed in 1903 as The Flag of the Commonwealth of Australia.

This is the Flag which was gazetted again in 1909 as the Flag of the Commonwealth of Australia.

This is the Flag which was carried on the Battlefields of WWI, despite what some others say.

This is the Flag which was carried by Chaplain Merrigton of Emmanuel College and raised above his tent in Gallipoli and France in WWI. I am sure that Mr Edmonds, the Principle of Emmanuel College would be delighted to tell you more about this historic Flag, now carefully preserved in College archives.

This is the Flag which was raised at the famous Battle of Polygon Wood, 20 September 1917. This was the capture of a German pill-box and the planting of the Australian Flag thereon by Lt A.V. L. Hull of 18 Bn. Subsequently, Sgt B Bateson of 26 Bn placed a second Australian Flag thereon.

This is the Flag which is now raised every morning at the little school in Villers-Bretonneux in France in the memory of the thousands of Australian casualties in freeing their village from the Germans in 1917.

This is the Flag carried by Sir John Monash's lance bearer in the historic march of 5,000 Australian troops through London on Anzac Day 1919 - the Flag which now resides in the Australian War Memorial.

This is the Flag which was carried to the Olympic Games in 1904 and throughout this century has witnessed a remarkable record of Australian successes. The recent Games at Atlanta are all fresh in our memory and no doubt it will play an important role in the Sydney Olympics of the year 2000.

Unfortunately, the Sydney Organising Committee is anti-flag. The National Flag has been removed from the traditional logo being replaced by childlike squiggles which no one could associate with Australia.

In the Olympic display now on show at Westfield Shoppingtown, you will not find any reference to the Australian Flag. There are no photos, for example, of our outstanding athletes standing on the dais while our National Flag is raised. There is no photo of the host country, Australia, leading the procession in Melbourne in 1956.

This is the Flag which was flown over our first Parliament House in Melbourne, then in Canberra in 1927 and now over our Parliament House in Canberra with its striking flag pole.

This is the Flag which covered the coffin of the Unknown Soldier as he was laid to rest in old Parliament House and now at the Australian War Memorial.
This is the Flag which drapes the coffin of all ex-servicemen and women as they are borne to their last resting place.

This is the flag which was flying at the Residency in Darwin when it was bombed by the Japanese on 19 February 1942. It was riddled with bullets, the first Flag damaged by enemy action on Australian soil. It was taken south for safety but brought back for the Peace Ceremony in 1946, flanked on one side by the Flag which flew at Villers-Brentonneux in 1917 on the other by the Flag flown by HMAS Sydney when it destroyed the Italian Cruiser Bartolomeo Colleoni in the Mediterranean in 1940.

This is the Flag raised by Sgt Derrick on a shell torn tree at Sattelberg in 1945. Sgt Derrick was later awarded the VC.

This is the Flag which was raised over Kokoda, Lae, Buna, Gona and other towns in New Guinea as they were retaken from the Japanese in WWII.

This is the Flag commemorated on a special plaque at Lae which reads: "Here on 16 September 1943 the Australian National Flag was raised by the commander 25th Australia Inf Bde to mark the capture of this important base from the Japanese".

This is the Flag which was paraded at Japanese surrender ceremonies and in victory marches.

This is the Flag which hung in the Amiens Cathedral in France for 46 years and now rests in the Australian War Memorial - replaced by the 19th Battalion Association - during the unveiling of the Mont St Quentin Memorial 29 August 1971.

Yet there are those who say we never had a Flag until 1953!

This is the Flag which featured dramatically and with great reverence in the city march by Vietnam veterans - when 508 National Flags were paraded, one for each Australian who lost his life in that campaign.

This is the Flag which was raised by the released POWs at Changi in 1945. We are honored today that one of our Flag bearers, Mr Os Blau, was one of those POWs.

What I have said has been about the Army - the custodian of our National Flag. I could have recounted similar exploits about the RAAF and RAN.

This is the Flag raised by signallers of Coy 3RAR on Hill 323 in Long Hoi in operation Pinnaroo Vietnam 19 March 1968. The original now rests in the Australian War Memorial.

What history there is in our Flag. As it proclaims to all the world our national identity and our heritage. Yet according to the Heritage Commission it may not be so listed because of its mobility. A tree that may fall down and die, a building that may be destroyed by fire may be so listed but not our National Flag.

Yet there are vandals who would destroy our National Flag (and replace it with a nondescript piece of rag unrelated to anything of the past 96 years) a minority group of (socialist) reformers, ill-informed idealist, (ignorant) and prejudiced politicians who are anti-British, anti-Christian but clever and ruthless operators who appear to have unlimited financial resources to promote their cause.

No valid poll has yet indicated a majority of Australians want to change the Flag.

No valid argument has yet been produced for a change in our Flag.

Yet there are plenty of historical inaccuracies, half-truths, misrepresentations and even outright lies about our Flag and its history.

It is interesting to note their change of tack with respect to the Republic. At first they were joined as one issue but the strength of the support for the Flag was so strong it was lessening the support for the Republic.

Now they are regarded as separate issues. The Flag is not part of the Constitution and is not on the Republican agenda according to the Chairman of the Australian Republican Movement - but can you trust them?

We loyal and patriotic Australians have the task ahead of us in being more vocal in support of the present Australian National Flag - write to the politicians, write letters to the press, get on talk-back radio and support the Australian National Flag Association of Queensland in its good work, fly our National Flag every day and encourage others to do the same. Above all, see that our school children know of its great history and heritage.

As we look at the National Flag today, we should all remember we are looking at a priceless piece of history and heritage, To quote the words of that memorable poem:

It doesn't mean we owe allegiance
To a forgotten imperial dream 
We've the stars to show where we're going
And the old flag to show where we've been.

What a wonderful Flag! What a beautiful Flag! Long may it continue to fly over this great country, Australia.

http://www.members.iinet.net.au/~nedwood/flag.html

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2 hours ago, Luna Bliss said:

I looked it up...the actual name is 'The Angel Flag Of Pureness And Light'.

Trying to get another thread locked Luna?

Aren't you happy getting one locked already this week?

Pity, because I had a whole list of proofs for you, but we can't resurrect dead threads.

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'Southern Cross' became the battle flag of Dixie

By Dr. Terry L. Jones
Special to The Journal

On November 27, 1861, Louisiana General P. G. T. Beauregard hosted a dinner party for his officers. Beauregard was the South's first hero, having captured Fort Sumter in April and then defeated the Yankees at the First Battle of Bull Run in July. Now, he commanded the Confederate army stationed in Northern Virginia to block any enemy advance out of Washington, D.C.

During the evening, Beauregard told his guests how the fog of war had caused him to nearly throw away the victory at Bull Run by ordering a headlong retreat. The fighting had raged since daylight on July 21, 1861, after General Irwin McDowell's Union army attacked Beauregard from across the small Virginia stream known as Bull Run. The battle seesawed back and forth throughout the day, but fresh troops rushed in from the Shenandoah Valley had finally given Beauregard the advantage. Then, just as victory seemed certain, he spied a heavy column of troops more than a mile away maneuvering on his flank.

Beauregard explained, "At their head waved a flag which I could not distinguish. Even by a strong glass I was unable to determine whether it was the United States flag or the Confederate flag. At this moment I received a dispatch from Capt. [Porter] Alexander, in charge of the signal station, warning me to look out for the left; that a large column was approaching in that direction, and that it was supposed to be Gen. [Robert] Patterson's command coming to reinforce McDowell. At this moment, I must confess, my heart failed me."

Beauregard knew his exhausted men could not withstand a determined flank attack. "I came, reluctantly, to the conclusion that after all our efforts, we should at last be compelled to yield to the enemy the hard fought and bloody field." Beauregard turned to an officer and instructed him to go to the rear and tell General Joseph E. Johnston to prepare the reserves to support the retreat he was about to order. As the officer began to leave, Beauregard had second thoughts and told him to wait a minute to make sure that it actually was Yankees bearing down upon them. It proved to be a fortuitous decision. "I took the glass and again examined the flag. . . .A sudden gust of wind shook out its folds, and I recognized the stars and bars of the Confederate banner."

The mysterious flag turned out to be the Confederacy's First National Flag, which resembled the United States flag in both color and design. It was carried at the head of Colonel Harry T. Hays' 7th Louisiana Volunteers, the lead regiment in Colonel Jubal Early's brigade that was attacking the Union flank. Early's bold move helped win the day, and the First Battle of Bull Run ended in a complete Confederate victory. Few people knew how close Beauregard had come to throwing away that victory simply because he could not identify a flag on the battlefield.

Determined to avoid similar mistakes in the future, Beauregard decided the Confederates needed a distinctive battle flag. Collaborating with Joseph E. Johnston and others, he settled on a design that South Carolina Congressman William Porcher Miles had submitted earlier for consideration as the First National Flag. Miles' submission was a blue St. Andrew's Cross on a red background, with white stars representing the Southern states.

Shortly after the dinner, Beauregard was transferred to the western Confederacy and the new battle flag took root there, as well. The Louisiana-inspired battle flag became known as the Southern Cross, and it was adopted by the other armies when General Beauregard was transferred to the western theater of war. However, it was never an official flag of the Confederate government and it was never flown over public buildings despite what Hollywood might have one believe. The Southern Cross was simply a military banner that troops carried in the field. Nonetheless, it became the iconic symbol of the Rebel cause, and it was later incorporated into the Confederacy's Second and Third National Flags.

Dr. Terry L. Jones is a professor of history at the University of Louisiana at Monroe and has published six books on the American Civil War.

http://www.thepineywoods.com/BattleFlagNov11.htm

 

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17 minutes ago, Phorumities said:

Pity, because I had a whole list of proofs for you, but we can't resurrect dead threads.

Oh you can PM me with those proofs...

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Phorumities, why would you put the Confederate Battle flag on your RL car when you know this symbol has been used to harm black people? The Ku Klux Clan adopted it in the 30's, and it strikes terror in the hearts of some blacks.
As usual, you're so insensitive.

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You know the swastika was used in positive ways before Hitler used it. But imagine someone who today insisted using this symbol because it, at one time, had a positive or neutral meaning...
I would never insist on using a symbol that offends others, others who have been so terrorized by those symbols. I wouldn't care if they paid me a million dollars. Yet you insist your rights/needs trump their sense of pain and horror.

" The Original Meaning Of The Swastika

The word "swastika" comes from the Sanskrit svastika - "su" meaning "good," "asti" meaning "to be," and "ka" as a suffix.

Until the Nazis used this symbol, the swastika was used by many cultures throughout the past 3,000 years to represent life, sun, power, strength, and good luck.

Even in the early twentieth century, the swastika was still a symbol with positive connotations. For instance, the swastika was a common decoration that often adorned cigarette cases, postcards, coins, and buildings.

During World War I, the swastika could even be found on the shoulder patches of the American 45th Division and on the Finnish air force until after World War II."

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41 minutes ago, Phorumities said:

Interestingly I see Australian socialists are on a campaign to discredit and replace the Australian Southern Cross. North or south, east or west, socialists all sing that same sad refrain....

down with western heritage and tradition.

 

 

ADDRESS BY DR. RUPERT GOODMAN 
on the first National Flag Day, 3rd September 1997


 

This is a very special day in Australian history. The Governor-General has proclaimed that 3 September henceforth be known as National Flag Day, this year commemorating the 96th anniversary of the first unfurling of our National Flag on 3 September 1901 in Melbourne, following a public competition which drew 32,000 entries.

This was performed by the Countess of Hopetoun, wife of our first Governor- General and in the presence of our first Prime Minister, Edmund Barton.

This is the complete answer to those who say we never had a flag until 1953.

As you look at the Flag you are looking at 96 years of Australian history in war and peace.

This is the Flag which King Edward VII and the then Governor-General, The Earl of Hopetoun, proclaimed in 1903 as The Flag of the Commonwealth of Australia.

This is the Flag which was gazetted again in 1909 as the Flag of the Commonwealth of Australia.

This is the Flag which was carried on the Battlefields of WWI, despite what some others say.

This is the Flag which was carried by Chaplain Merrigton of Emmanuel College and raised above his tent in Gallipoli and France in WWI. I am sure that Mr Edmonds, the Principle of Emmanuel College would be delighted to tell you more about this historic Flag, now carefully preserved in College archives.

This is the Flag which was raised at the famous Battle of Polygon Wood, 20 September 1917. This was the capture of a German pill-box and the planting of the Australian Flag thereon by Lt A.V. L. Hull of 18 Bn. Subsequently, Sgt B Bateson of 26 Bn placed a second Australian Flag thereon.

This is the Flag which is now raised every morning at the little school in Villers-Bretonneux in France in the memory of the thousands of Australian casualties in freeing their village from the Germans in 1917.

This is the Flag carried by Sir John Monash's lance bearer in the historic march of 5,000 Australian troops through London on Anzac Day 1919 - the Flag which now resides in the Australian War Memorial.

This is the Flag which was carried to the Olympic Games in 1904 and throughout this century has witnessed a remarkable record of Australian successes. The recent Games at Atlanta are all fresh in our memory and no doubt it will play an important role in the Sydney Olympics of the year 2000.

Unfortunately, the Sydney Organising Committee is anti-flag. The National Flag has been removed from the traditional logo being replaced by childlike squiggles which no one could associate with Australia.

In the Olympic display now on show at Westfield Shoppingtown, you will not find any reference to the Australian Flag. There are no photos, for example, of our outstanding athletes standing on the dais while our National Flag is raised. There is no photo of the host country, Australia, leading the procession in Melbourne in 1956.

This is the Flag which was flown over our first Parliament House in Melbourne, then in Canberra in 1927 and now over our Parliament House in Canberra with its striking flag pole.

This is the Flag which covered the coffin of the Unknown Soldier as he was laid to rest in old Parliament House and now at the Australian War Memorial.
This is the Flag which drapes the coffin of all ex-servicemen and women as they are borne to their last resting place.

This is the flag which was flying at the Residency in Darwin when it was bombed by the Japanese on 19 February 1942. It was riddled with bullets, the first Flag damaged by enemy action on Australian soil. It was taken south for safety but brought back for the Peace Ceremony in 1946, flanked on one side by the Flag which flew at Villers-Brentonneux in 1917 on the other by the Flag flown by HMAS Sydney when it destroyed the Italian Cruiser Bartolomeo Colleoni in the Mediterranean in 1940.

This is the Flag raised by Sgt Derrick on a shell torn tree at Sattelberg in 1945. Sgt Derrick was later awarded the VC.

This is the Flag which was raised over Kokoda, Lae, Buna, Gona and other towns in New Guinea as they were retaken from the Japanese in WWII.

This is the Flag commemorated on a special plaque at Lae which reads: "Here on 16 September 1943 the Australian National Flag was raised by the commander 25th Australia Inf Bde to mark the capture of this important base from the Japanese".

This is the Flag which was paraded at Japanese surrender ceremonies and in victory marches.

This is the Flag which hung in the Amiens Cathedral in France for 46 years and now rests in the Australian War Memorial - replaced by the 19th Battalion Association - during the unveiling of the Mont St Quentin Memorial 29 August 1971.

Yet there are those who say we never had a Flag until 1953!

This is the Flag which featured dramatically and with great reverence in the city march by Vietnam veterans - when 508 National Flags were paraded, one for each Australian who lost his life in that campaign.

This is the Flag which was raised by the released POWs at Changi in 1945. We are honored today that one of our Flag bearers, Mr Os Blau, was one of those POWs.

What I have said has been about the Army - the custodian of our National Flag. I could have recounted similar exploits about the RAAF and RAN.

This is the Flag raised by signallers of Coy 3RAR on Hill 323 in Long Hoi in operation Pinnaroo Vietnam 19 March 1968. The original now rests in the Australian War Memorial.

What history there is in our Flag. As it proclaims to all the world our national identity and our heritage. Yet according to the Heritage Commission it may not be so listed because of its mobility. A tree that may fall down and die, a building that may be destroyed by fire may be so listed but not our National Flag.

Yet there are vandals who would destroy our National Flag (and replace it with a nondescript piece of rag unrelated to anything of the past 96 years) a minority group of (socialist) reformers, ill-informed idealist, (ignorant) and prejudiced politicians who are anti-British, anti-Christian but clever and ruthless operators who appear to have unlimited financial resources to promote their cause.

No valid poll has yet indicated a majority of Australians want to change the Flag.

No valid argument has yet been produced for a change in our Flag.

Yet there are plenty of historical inaccuracies, half-truths, misrepresentations and even outright lies about our Flag and its history.

It is interesting to note their change of tack with respect to the Republic. At first they were joined as one issue but the strength of the support for the Flag was so strong it was lessening the support for the Republic.

Now they are regarded as separate issues. The Flag is not part of the Constitution and is not on the Republican agenda according to the Chairman of the Australian Republican Movement - but can you trust them?

We loyal and patriotic Australians have the task ahead of us in being more vocal in support of the present Australian National Flag - write to the politicians, write letters to the press, get on talk-back radio and support the Australian National Flag Association of Queensland in its good work, fly our National Flag every day and encourage others to do the same. Above all, see that our school children know of its great history and heritage.

As we look at the National Flag today, we should all remember we are looking at a priceless piece of history and heritage, To quote the words of that memorable poem:

It doesn't mean we owe allegiance
To a forgotten imperial dream 
We've the stars to show where we're going
And the old flag to show where we've been.

What a wonderful Flag! What a beautiful Flag! Long may it continue to fly over this great country, Australia.

http://www.members.iinet.net.au/~nedwood/flag.html

And yet, nowhere in that article (from twenty-one years ago) does it refer to the Australian National Flag as the "Southern Cross."

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I guess Australians should just give up their flag now because "racists" and Nationalists use it.

---------------------------------------------

October 22, 2014 10.21pm EDT

Take back the stars and wear the Southern Cross with pride

Australian hip-hop artist and rapper 360 (Matt Colwell) caused an uproar earlier in the week when he said on Q&A  that he identified the Australian flag and the Southern Cross with racism.

360 announced he would like to see more proud Australians wearing the Aboriginal flag on Australia Day. Why? Because the Australian flag has become synonymous with hate.

There was an angry response on social media: many took issue with the accusation that the nation’s flag had become the standard for racists and bigots. If we look a little closer at the Australian flag, and particularly at those seven shining stars, we might find symbols that can unite us anew.

The Australian flag is made up of the Union Jack, the Commonwealth star and the Southern Cross. The flag’s design was chosen in 1901 from a series of entries in a competition held following Federation. It was first flown in Melbourne on September 3 1901.

The Southern Cross is an easily identifiable emblem for all Australians and in Aboriginal Australian astronomy, the Southern Cross has had many different meanings.

For more than 40,000 years Aboriginal people have looked up at the night sky and its stars. The first Australians’ way of being in the world has been shaped by their relationship with the skies.

Five stars make up the Southern Cross - Alpha, Beta (also known as Mimosa), Delta, Gamma and Epsilon Crucis, also sometimes called Intrometida.

For the Guringai people in New South Wales, the cross marks the head of the Emu in the Sky; Alpha Crucis symbolises the shape shifting spirit Dharramaalan and the Crux his emu wife.

In Western Australia there are Aboriginal communities who believe the Southern Cross is the deity Mirrabooka, a giant sky possum, sitting in a tree.

In the central Australian desert the Aranda people believe the four stars of the Southern Cross are the immense talon of a great flying eagle, with Gamma Centauri being his leg. In the Torres Strait, many islanders believed Gamma Centauri is the handle of Tagai’s Fishing Spear, with the Cross forming a trident.

And as the Southern Cross is arguably the most recognisable constellation in our night sky, it seems a fitting emblem for uniting all Australians with a sense of national identity. After all, we all live under the same stars.

With that in mind I would like to note how intensely and personally disenchanted I am, along with 360, that such a seemingly perfect symbol of our unity has been all but hijacked and turned into a sign of racism and xenophobia.

The 2005 Cronulla race riots ushered in the beginning of a series of racially motivated gang attacks and denominational clashes in Australia. The Southern Cross was worn like a badge signifying whiteness.

When I was a child I was bullied for having fair skin and identifying with my Aboriginal heritage.

After spending some time hunting stingrays with family on the coast of the Northern Territory, I came back to Melbourne with stories of my walkabout. People started bullying me, calling me “spear chucker”.

Last year I was tattooed with the image of a spear, because I wanted to reclaim that name. I believe we, as a country, collectively need to take similar steps to reclaim our constellation. We need to tattoo the Southern Cross on our national identity as a symbol of unity and peace.

A quick Google search of the Australian flag returns a substantial quota of images that are brazenly pro-racist. If we can concede that our flag and our constellation have been appropriated by a racist few, and have thus had a wide-reaching effect on our national identity, we can begin to undo some of those damages.

Our stars are associated with hate but they’re not synonymous. I propose we collectively meet those who have hijacked the constellation as a symbol of hate with a movement of reclamation. It’s time for all Australians to start wearing the Southern Cross with pride.

http://theconversation.com/take-back-the-stars-and-wear-the-southern-cross-with-pride-33301

---------------------------------------------

It's interesting that those "race riots" mentioned were caused by gangs of Muslim Immigrants harassing white women. But the article makes it appear whites were to blame. 

Edited by Phorumities
fixed stuff
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8 minutes ago, Theresa Tennyson said:

And yet, nowhere in that article (from twenty-one years ago) does it refer to the Australian National Flag as the "Southern Cross."

I'm not the one that brought up the Australian Southern Cross, others did, take it up with them.

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45 minutes ago, Phorumities said:

Trying to get another thread locked Luna?

Wait? You didn't open this with the intention to get it locked first place :o ?

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5 hours ago, Theresa Tennyson said:

The stars of the constellation the Australian flag shows date back millions/billions of years ago. Stars win...

You've tickled my inner amateur astronomer, Theresa.

Three of the five brightest stars in the Southern Cross are bluish babies (millions of years), and share similar proper motions because they were birthed by the same mom (a cloud). The other two are yellow, closer and far older (billions). So both of your age guesses are correct. I fired up Stellarium to see what Crux (The Southern Cross) looked like during the Civil War, Now, 1K, 10K and 90K years from now.

The five stars of the kite (which is what it looks like to this atheist kite flyer) are, in order of brightness, Acrux, Mimosa, Gacrux, δ Cru and Ginan. Here's an animated GIF of the progression from 1860 to 92018, anchored to Mimosa. You can see that Acrux, Mimosa, and δ Cru (the blue babies) do stay together while Gacrux and Ginan go hiking off on their own....

Crux.thumb.gif.e9747fe11cd4fd3d0a08580a5a98bba9.gif

If humans are still around in 92018, they won't be talking about the Southern Cross.

I found a cool webpage that shows proper motion of stars in our galaxy. I don't know what part of the sky it uses as home base. The DeLorean at the bottom is the time slider, and it's logarithmic. Give it a drag!

https://spacetimeapp.herokuapp.com

And I agree, stars win!

Edited by Madelaine McMasters
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20 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:


You know the swastika was used in positive ways before Hitler used it. But imagine someone who today insisted using this symbol because it, at one time, had a positive or neutral meaning...
I would never insist on using a symbol that offends others, others who have been so terrorized by those symbols. I wouldn't care if they paid me a million dollars. Yet you insist your rights/needs trump their sense of pain and horror.

" The Original Meaning Of The Swastika

The word "swastika" comes from the Sanskrit svastika - "su" meaning "good," "asti" meaning "to be," and "ka" as a suffix.

Until the Nazis used this symbol, the swastika was used by many cultures throughout the past 3,000 years to represent life, sun, power, strength, and good luck.

Even in the early twentieth century, the swastika was still a symbol with positive connotations. For instance, the swastika was a common decoration that often adorned cigarette cases, postcards, coins, and buildings.

During World War I, the swastika could even be found on the shoulder patches of the American 45th Division and on the Finnish air force until after World War II."

Thats nice So what? 

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1 minute ago, Fionalein said:

Wait? You didn't open this with the intention to get it locked first place :o ?

Why would I want my own thread locked?

 

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41 minutes ago, Phorumities said:

Shortly after the dinner, Beauregard was transferred to the western Confederacy and the new battle flag took root there, as well. The Louisiana-inspired battle flag became known as the Southern Cross, and it was adopted by the other armies when General Beauregard was transferred to the western theater of war.

 

When?

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7 minutes ago, Phorumities said:
28 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:


You know the swastika was used in positive ways before Hitler used it. But imagine someone who today insisted using this symbol because it, at one time, had a positive or neutral meaning...
I would never insist on using a symbol that offends others, others who have been so terrorized by those symbols. I wouldn't care if they paid me a million dollars. Yet you insist your rights/needs trump their sense of pain and horror.

" The Original Meaning Of The Swastika

The word "swastika" comes from the Sanskrit svastika - "su" meaning "good," "asti" meaning "to be," and "ka" as a suffix.

Until the Nazis used this symbol, the swastika was used by many cultures throughout the past 3,000 years to represent life, sun, power, strength, and good luck.

Even in the early twentieth century, the swastika was still a symbol with positive connotations. For instance, the swastika was a common decoration that often adorned cigarette cases, postcards, coins, and buildings.

During World War I, the swastika could even be found on the shoulder patches of the American 45th Division and on the Finnish air force until after World War II."

Thats nice So what? 

So why do you insist on doing something that bothers others so greatly?

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1 minute ago, Luna Bliss said:

So why do you insist on doing something that bothers others so greatly?

You have not figured it out yet?

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1 minute ago, Fionalein said:
3 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

So why do you insist on doing something that bothers others so greatly?

You have not figured it out yet?

I fear I sometimes have hope, where there is none...

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12 minutes ago, Phorumities said:

Why would I want my own thread locked?

 

  • because almost every thread you participate in does get locked
  • because you obvioulsy always intentionally post things you know will start you a flamewar
  • because you are stalwartly refusing to learn from the past (both history or your former account) - OK that might actually explain why you keep working hard to get threads locked, duh 9_9

... guess your RL down south must be really boring ...

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1 hour ago, Phorumities said:

Excuse me, the flag design is the St Andrews Cross, modified it became the Southern Cross.

Here' s a link I'm sure all you lefties will hate.

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2001/04/david-dieteman/that-dangerous-st-andrews-cross/

 

Please direct me to a contemporary source that calls it the "Southern Cross."     

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35 minutes ago, Luna Bliss said:

So why do you insist on doing something that bothers others so greatly?

I'm really not responsible for how anyone elses chooses to interpret anything I do.

In other words, It's not my problem, its yours.

 

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