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What's your IRL job?


cykarushb
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Japanese translator and interpreter, currently on the bilingual loop of account executives for a global payment technology brand. I was working at the Consulate-General of Japan in San Francisco when my husband’s company relocated us to the United States from 2010-2014, around the same time I got into SecondLife. I must admit that being on SL did “enrich” my vocabulary in English quite a lot, and it helped me so much at work.

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I work in park maintenance and my team covers a handful of council-owned town parks and sports fields. Mowing the grass, planting trees, clearing weeds, maintaining fences, signage and sports equipment etc. Its mostly outdoors or in greenhouses, and covid hasn't had much impact on the work as the parks I work on have remained open. And I get to drive a tractor. 😁

 

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my goal is to get a RL job where I get paid heaps to laze about work supersmart in cafes dreaming up good ideas for other people to do. Not just cafes either. I am multiskilled, mutltitasking even. I can work just as supersmart when I am getting my hair and nails done as well

i haven't found the ideal employer yet. Dunno why

😺

 

 

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Since open source doesn't count here... I'm a web developer in the paid RL, working in a small company - doing not very interesting stuff for a regular mortal, I'd guess. Server maintenance (yay for PuTTY), PostgreSQL/MySQL databases, PHP, XML, APIs; HTML/CSS/JS/AJAX etc. on frontend as well.

Sometimes things even don't blow up.

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Maybe I answered this years ago when this thread opened?

Anyhoo. I'm the Director of Finance and Operations for a well known small NYC architectural company which includes HR/billing/ and anything else related to $$$. Been working for architecture firms for more years then I care to remember. 

Ask me in a few more years what I do and hopefully will be able to say retired :D

 

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On 3/16/2021 at 6:45 PM, Prokofy Neva said:

I'm a Russian translator and news writer.

What I find fascinating about this thread is that many (most?) are in IT, programmers, computer specialists of some kind, scientists.

Then many other are in service roles, truckers, medical transcriptionists, secretaries, health care workers, etc.

Quite a few said they are now suffering chronic illnesses or retired.

So that's quite a gulf in classes and cultures, from computer programmer to note taker for some large corporation or public entity. Yet people more or less get along in SL.

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On 3/17/2021 at 9:01 AM, Orwar said:

   Previously worked as, and now studying to become a bookbinder. 

My dad worked his entire working life in the printing trade, for the same company, from 1952 to 2002; he was a typesetter (and later a litho-printer) rather than a bookbinder, but I used to spend many an afternoon there during the school holidays and one of the departments I hung around in from time to time was bookbinding.  They showed me how to do it and once I had a go myself (though rather shoddily). I think I still remember how to do the stitching though. 

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Just now, Lewis Luminos said:

I think I still remember how to do the stitching though. 

   There are a pretty mind-blowing amount of different types of stitching, part of our curriculum in school has been to do 27 different types (plus some extra variants) as a separate project, ranging from simple single-section pamphlet bindings to triple raised cords with double loops, and things like some variants of Japanese and helical sewing (though I've yet to figure out when exactly you would actually use a helical stitch - I guess an exposed spine construction of some sort so it'll actually be visible, or possibly as a limp binding sewn through the cover like a long-stitch). The general go-to method is the 'all out' sewing wherein you start at one end and go back and forth through each hole in each section, it's practically the same thing whether you're using cords with a single hole or tapes with two holes each.

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   These I made in my first year, from top to bottom there's:

  • All-out sewing on tapes.
  • French sewing without tapes.
  • French sewing on tapes.

   The vast majority of books I make today though is sewn all-out (or one-up, if there are a lot of sections), usually on frayed cords with two holes. And these days it does tend to look a bit more regular!

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Pipeline TD in a CG studio. Basically i write the procedures and standards to create, store, load, rig and distribute the content used in the production of CG based/augmented shows. Previously I worked in the game branch of the industry in small studios. Started as modeler, then surface artist, rigger and now scripting the pipeline.

I'd rather go back to a less paid position as rigger though.

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