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EmpereurNapoleonBonaparte

Let’s see who shares the same taste of music

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2 hours ago, EmpereurNapoleonBonaparte said:

I didn’t know that the forums have been acting up. Maybe it’s your internet connection—or has it been acting up on everyone like that recently? I haven’t encountered a problem like that, yet.

I think you wrote about Tallis forming the bases for your favorite song. Didn’t you include it when you posted all 3 of the videos?

It’s a hard choice. I think you should choose any song because they all sound splendid. I’m not sure if you have enough time to listen to the entire video below.

Here’s a video that shows one song.

 

Thank you for those.  I've bookmarked the longer video for tomorrow's listening.  Both pieces reminded me of Mozart at the beginning, though they are less intricate.  I hadn't known that Paisiello was such an influence on Mozart, so I have learned something today.  I'll step back now and make room for more people to respond :) 

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5 minutes ago, Garnet Psaltery said:

Thank you for those.  I've bookmarked the longer video for tomorrow's listening.  Both pieces reminded me of Mozart at the beginning, though they are less intricate.  I hadn't known that Paisiello was such an influence on Mozart, so I have learned something today.  I'll step back now and make room for more people to respond :) 

Mozart went to Italy when he was younger for a vacation. He met Italian composers and listened to their songs, I think. That’s why in the beginning, his songs sounded different. As he got older, his music style changed.

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5 hours ago, Garnet Psaltery said:

Ethan, thank you for the Jaroussky.  I prefer Andreas Scholl's version - cleaner and purer to my ear.  Just a matter of taste.  Bonaparte, I have no idea what you'll make of this but it's late and I feel like something soothing.

 

No worries, Madame! I’ll give you my opinion on your song. The 1920’s song sounds kind of soothing, kind of abstract, and mystical. It’s not something that I listen to, but it sounds a lot like a bedtime song for sleeping. It should be in a playlist about nighttime melodies.

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Music snobbery is a sad thing.

If I like a piece of music, a track, a beat, an anthem, then I like it because I like it and just because it may fall into a category or genre that is mainstream or popular, or not, does not make me like it any more or less. Having said that, country music and heavy rock likes are far and few between compared to everything else, but that doesn't mean I automatically dislike them due to their musical genre. I think it is because I am not American.

My musical likes tend to fall mostly between happy and upbeat soul/funk, mellow relaxing jazz/electronic/smooth jazz, to sad melancholic. In general, my music collection is not very mainstream and I have no idea at all what music resides in the current charts as I never listen to commercial radio or watch live television.

If I had to choose only one instrument to listen to, it would be the piano.

mesmerising ..

 

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Candice LittleBoots said:

Music snobbery is a sad thing.

If I like a piece of music, a track, a beat, an anthem, then I like it because I like it and just because it may fall into a category or genre that is mainstream or popular, or not, does not make me like it any more or less. Having said that, country music and heavy rock likes are far and few between compared to everything else, but that doesn't mean I automatically dislike them due to their musical genre. I think it is because I am not American.

My musical likes tend to fall mostly between happy and upbeat soul/funk, mellow relaxing jazz/electronic/smooth jazz, to sad melancholic. In general, my music collection is not very mainstream and I have no idea at all what music resides in the current charts as I never listen to commercial radio or watch live television.

If I had to choose only one instrument to listen to, it would be the piano.

mesmerising ..

 

 

 

I agree that music snobbery is sad. My parents have been telling me since I was a little kid to adjust and be more open and selfless to other’s tastes. My friends and family had tried to help me open up, but it didn’t work very well. I don’t know why I’ve been picky with my music when I was very little. There has to be a reason behind my disliking of other types of songs, but I can’t seem to figure out the answer.

I’m pretty sure that it doesn’t depend on being American or another citizen from a different country. It all depends on your taste and style.

My classmates know about mainstream music and listen to them. That’s how I, at least for the most part, know some of the common ones. I don’t listen to commercial radio nor live television either.

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On 10/1/2018 at 2:31 PM, EmpereurNapoleonBonaparte said:

Have you heard of any shows or movies about the Tudors?

Did you see "The Tudors"?  It aired on the premium cable channel Showtime, but now it's on Netflix.  It's ridiculously historically inaccurate, but lovely to watch! :D

 

Edited by Maureen Boccaccio

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   I've said it before and I'll say it again; there are many interesting genres of music - but it ain't music if it ain't punk!

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On 10/1/2018 at 8:43 PM, Candice LittleBoots said:

Music snobbery is a sad thing.

If I like a piece of music, a track, a beat, an anthem, then I like it because I like it and just because it may fall into a category or genre that is mainstream or popular, or not, does not make me like it any more or less. Having said that, country music and heavy rock likes are far and few between compared to everything else, but that doesn't mean I automatically dislike them due to their musical genre. I think it is because I am not American.

My musical likes tend to fall mostly between happy and upbeat soul/funk, mellow relaxing jazz/electronic/smooth jazz, to sad melancholic. In general, my music collection is not very mainstream and I have no idea at all what music resides in the current charts as I never listen to commercial radio or watch live television.

If I had to choose only one instrument to listen to, it would be the piano.

mesmerising ..

 

 

 

   I'm like you. I like a lot of different things. I Like what I like and ignore popular culture if it doesn't please me. I like Satie. He was sad and he told the world about it. I said like a lot.

   Like.

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13 hours ago, Maureen Boccaccio said:

Did you see "The Tudors"?  It aired on the premium cable channel Showtime, but now it's on Netflix.  It's ridiculously historically inaccurate, but lovely to watch! :D

 

I agree that it's historically inaccurate. King Henry VIII wasn't that handsome.

Sadly, I haven't seen that show, yet. I don't watch TV channels anymore (the last time I watched them was when I was a kid 10 years ago until I moved to Youtube), and I don't have Netflix. My parents claim that it's too expensive. Only one of my aunts have Netflix, and I did borrow her Netflix account once. On Netflix, I only watched all the Hitler movies and documentaries because I didn't know what to watch. I know I don't like episodes and shows about gossips. Plus, Netflix barely has anything that I know of that I like, so I went with Hitler movies.

There is a movie about Hitler waking up in present day Germany, and he had to learn how to adapt to the evolving culture. He was surprised by the change of Germany and the environment around him. One day, he encountered a man and the man became Hitler's friend.

The man turned out that he works for a movie company that is falling in debt. The female boss warned her workers that if they didn't earn enough money, her company would have to close down. Soon, the man whom Hitler met introduced Hitler to some of the man's coworkers. They had varied reactions. When Hitler started working for the movie company and made videos with the workers, people started visiting Hitler. Sometimes Hitler made visits to random people. Scientists wanted to know how Hitler came to the present day. They found out that a portal magically appeared where Hitler was sleeping.

Hitler claimed that he was asleep in his bunker, but woke up in a completely different environment. Hitler gained more interviews and became very popular. In the movie, he became a sensational, and many people wanted to meet him and ask him questions. At the end of the movie, Hitler helped the failing movie company become very popular due to Hitler's iconic appearances in that company's newer movies.

The movie is called "Look Who's Back." I liked it, and it was interesting. Here's the link to the movie if you're interested in watching it: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4176826/

There are 2 more Hitler things I watched on Netflix. One was the historical "Der Untergang" while the other was a documentary about Hitler's life or lost arts.

"Der Untergang" is about Hitler's last days in the bunker, but it focused more on a female main character named Traudl Junge and what she did before Hitler's suicide. At the end, she escaped and quit working for Nazi Germany. Here's the link to the movie: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0363163/

The one Hitler documentary is about Hitler's life, career, arts, political ambitions, and many things about him as a person. I don't remember the title, but I believe it was this movie: https://www.netflix.com/title/80106791

It was about 1 - 3 years ago when I've watched all 3 of the Hitler movies in Netflix.

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On 10/5/2018 at 8:30 PM, Morgana Hilra said:

Being a violin player, I love Lindsey Stirling.

I tend to search out music that she is in compilations with.

 

Ah, interesting. Do you still play the violin? If so, what kind of songs do you like to play on the violin? What do you think of violin music from different centuries, such as the 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st centuries, Renaissance period, etc?

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On 10/8/2018 at 4:47 AM, EmpereurNapoleonBonaparte said:

? What do you think of violin music from different centuries, such as the 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st centuries, Renaissance period

Actually, my inspiration as a child was Beethoven. I would attempt to play along, teaching myself for the most part.
I still play, from time to time. Especially when I am upset, or if I miss my brother (my oldest, who passed away).
I need to replace my bows. I have 4. All of which "wear and tear" would be a harsh understatement. 

This is the best I could find online of one of my favorites, (for my mp3 player.) My personal version is rawer.

My favorite period of music would be the 1800s. 

Raw emotion. 

Idk how to explain it. Most don't understand my obsession. lol.


 

 

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Louis Armstrong once said there are only two kinds of music, good music and bad music.

But in my experience, bad music is often just good music at the wrong time and place.

I have a feeling this would be a good time and place for this:

 

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PHEW!!! My Music taste... hm ... let´s see^^

I exclude: german folk music ("Schlager"), medival folk music (popular with roleplayers and fantasynerds - as in Subway to Sally *yierhs*, Schandmaul, Tanzwut...), I´m really no big fan of Techno, trance, what have you... , the VAST majority of Hiphop and RnB, Soul, World Music, Rap, "Black Music" and Blues

let´s get to my likes XD

Classic: Mozart mostly, the popular classic stuff

modern classics: Elijah Bossenbroek, Lindsey Stirling, Taylor Davis, David Guetta, Salome Scheidegger, Andrea Bocelli, Sarah Brightman, Katherine Jenkins, Tarja Turunen, Emily Autumn

Rock: the 70s/80s classic rock bands (Kiss, Thin Lizzy, Alice Cooper you name them), GlamRock (TRex, Twisted Sister...), Placebo, Muse, Blur,...

Metal: from almost Rock, crossover over emo, alternative, melodic, orchestral down to black and death metal deep into the core section of grindcore (but I listen to tamer stuff usually)

Punk: oldschool stuff but mostly my beloved Horrorpunk (Blitzkid, Misfits, The Other, Kitty in a Casket, .....), Horrorbilly, Psychobilly, Deathrock, Postpunk

Pop: Take That (my way to learn English back in the days), Madonna, bits and pieces of this and that, Bara Heida (Check her song Stormtrooper), Britpop

other weird stuff: Blood on the Dance Floor, Porcellain and the Tramp, CMX, Waltari

Soundtracks: Velvet Goldmine (my favourite film), Star Wars (go figure xD)

Industrial/Cyberpunk/EBM, Darkwave (the darker part before it slides into techno but I gotta be in the mood for that

Electroswing: Diablo Swing Orchestra

most of my music is in English, Finnish, norwegian, some german stuff

example playlists:

and well ... along those lines more or less XD

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On 10/1/2018 at 7:34 PM, Garnet Psaltery said:

Thank you for the composer suggestion.  I can't recall hearing his work but it's likely I have done so in my time. How do you regard the work of Monteverdi, or to step outside of Italy, have you heard any Thomas Tallis?

That Tallis piece formed the basis for what is a favourite of mine, Ralph Vaughan Williams' 'Fantasia on a theme of Thomas Tallis'. 

Garnet that is no Classic (as defined as "Music from the Classical period" - well Williams is) That is a genre they now call "Old Music" (usually defined as "anything before the Classic period") - here late Renaissance (Tallis) and Early Baroque (Monteverdi)...

The Renaissance nad Early Baroque were great times for music - ... well until that Classic stuff happened ;)

Edited by Fionalein

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54 minutes ago, Fionalein said:

Garnet that is no Classic (as defined as "Music from the Classical period" - well Williams is) That is a genre they now call "Old Music" (usually defined as "anything before the Classic period") - here late Renaissance (Tallis) and Early Baroque (Monteverdi)...

The Renaissance nad Early Baroque were great times for music - ... well until that Classic stuff happened ;)

Thanks, but I am well aware of the genres to which you refer and have loved many pieces from all of them for nearly 6 decades. :)  I was using 'Classical' to mean not pop or folk or other broad genre.  I might have been mistaken in what the OP meant, of course, so I'll re-read what he said.

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1 minute ago, Garnet Psaltery said:

 Thanks, but I am well aware of the genres to which you refer and have loved many pieces from all of them for nearly 6 decades. :)  I was using 'Classical' to mean not pop or folk or other broad genre.  I might have been mistaken in what the OP meant, of course, so I'll re-read what he said.

I was just trying to be a smartass (But I really don't like the real Classic much)

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18 hours ago, Morgana Hilra said:

Actually, my inspiration as a child was Beethoven. I would attempt to play along, teaching myself for the most part.
I still play, from time to time. Especially when I am upset, or if I miss my brother (my oldest, who passed away).
I need to replace my bows. I have 4. All of which "wear and tear" would be a harsh understatement. 

This is the best I could find online of one of my favorites, (for my mp3 player.) My personal version is rawer.

My favorite period of music would be the 1800s. 

Raw emotion. 

Idk how to explain it. Most don't understand my obsession. lol.


 

 

Sorry for the loss of your brother. I hope you feel better now.

I'm thinking you like 1800's music because of the way the melodies and instruments sound. You love that they're often used for romantic music. Rawer? I think it means you enjoy live concerts more than music from radios.

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25 minutes ago, EmpereurNapoleonBonaparte said:

live concerts more than music from radio

Very much! When I lived in Toronto, I use to sit outside of Ontario Place when they had live concerts and such when I was a kid, and just read, and listen to the music.

That's the other thing I love. Reading. Everything. lol.

I was bored, so I read the FULL (up til all of the 2018 releases) series "for dummies" list. lol.

I didn't pay much attention to side notes but, hey... When the feeling moves ya, you know to grab what you can lol.

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5 hours ago, Fionalein said:

Garnet that is no Classic (as defined as "Music from the Classical period" - well Williams is)

If you really want to split hairs, Williams is romantic music, not classic. :P

Or maybe not. The term classical or "classic" music changes all the time. A century ago nobody would call an opera "classic" - that was pop music. In the two strictest definitions classical music is either European church music or music written in an elegant "galant" style during the 18th century or so (give or take a decade or five). In it's widest definition, well...

This reminds me of when ICTM (International Council for Traditional Music) tried to clarify exactly what traditional music is. The definition they ended up publishing was brillianty clear and concise and left no doubt whatsoever what was traditonal music and what wasn't. Unfortunately they had to change it because they couldn't find any music that fit.

(I don't really want to tell too much about my Real Life here but I've mentioned most of it before and since this is a thread about music, I probably should say a bit about my background:

I grew up with gammeldans music. (for the Irish: gammeldans is the Scandinavian equivalent to ceilidh. For everybody else: it's a mixture of 19th C. continental salon music and traditional Scandinavian music, in many ares - including where I come from - with a healthy doze of swing rhythm and phrasing (and no, swing is not jazz).) I'm classically trained, starting with piano lessons at the age of five, going on to a conservatory degree specializing in 16th century music. In a rare moment of intelligence I decided to get formal teaching credentials too so most of my adult life I've been able to make a decent living as a musician/music teacher without having to handle all the stress of touring and such. These days I mostly do folk music and blues and my experience with Tudor music has helped me a lot there since those styles are closely related.)

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