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What is wrong with men from Thailand ?

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When I was dating a Filipino, one day he said that “we should go to the Thai store”. Without any context, I thought he said “tie store” and still didn’t get it, out of context, even after he pronounced it “Thhhai store”.

Who knew Thai (food) stores existed in Florida? I’ve only been to Vietnamese, Korean, Chinese, Filipino, and Japanese stores. We never did go to the Thai store.

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11 hours ago, iamyourneighbour said:

when-youre-losing-an-online-argument-but-the-other-person-29696709.png.cbcac5d0630d640c908dfa66b948a102.png

Seeing as that was my first post in this thread.... Not sure how i was "losing" anything.  But as they say.. When you have no intelligent reply, post a meme.. 

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53 minutes ago, Callum Meriman said:

Well, my opinion is there are two ways to spell it, and it doesn't matter a hoot. Which is not the opinion of the person I was talking to.

According to Wiki the word wimp was first used in the 1920s in the US. In 45 years i have never seen it spelled with an H. So from my point of view, yes, there is no H in it. Just as we are told by the Brits that we spell color, armor, and flavor wrong..

Goes to get coffee.

"Yer spellin wimp wrong. Thats  OUR word. Ours because the rest a the world is fulla wimps and needs the USA to bail them outta every issue they sink their wimpy asses inta. USA USA USA USA!!!"


Drake beats the hell out of the redneck who snuck in while he was getting coffee. 

What the heck did that nit wit write? Ah, whatever... slaps the post button. 

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I spell it wimp, but pronounce it whimp, with extra emphasis on the h, mostly because it annoys people :D

 

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8 minutes ago, Tari Landar said:

I spell it wimp, but pronounce it whimp, with extra emphasis on the h, mostly because it annoys people :D

 

You could go even further, and pronounce it 'hwimp'.. ;-)

hwimp.thumb.png.3105dd927c7bf329100f7e046e25453a.png

Edited by LexxiXhan
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That is precisely why I pronounce the h when one is silent, in a LOT of words :P

My kids do it too, mostly when they want to annoy someone, lol. 

We have watched way too much family guy. 

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7 minutes ago, Tari Landar said:

That is precisely why I pronounce the h when one is silent, in a LOT of words :P

Brits make a big deal of pronouncing the h in herb because the yanks don't; however, do they ever pronounce the h in words that should start with it?  Like help, hear, her, he or hour?  OK, hour is bad example. :)

 

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21 minutes ago, Rhonda Huntress said:

do they ever pronounce the h in words that should start with it?  Like help, hear, her, he or hour?

Yes to all (except the last), unless we're Cockney sparrers ;)

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9 hours ago, Skell Dagger said:

Yes to all (except the last), unless we're Cockney sparrers ;)

Gawd bless ya guvner...you're a toff.

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23 hours ago, Drake1 Nightfire said:

Just as we are told by the Brits that we spell color, armor, and flavor wrong..

Not to mention realise, optimise, and most of the ises :)

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12 hours ago, Rhonda Huntress said:

Brits make a big deal of pronouncing the h in herb because the yanks don't; however, do they ever pronounce the h in words that should start with it?  Like help, hear, her, he or hour?  OK, hour is bad example. :)

Ditto what Skell said, plus we Brits don't make a big deal out of pronouncing the 'h' in herb because the yanks don't. There's nothing to make a big deal about. Saying herb correctly includes sounding the 'h', as in help. I'd never heard that our offspring (the yanks) got lazy and pronounce it differently, as in 'elp.

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I have a theory about the differences in spellings. It's just a theory.

The people who first populated North America from over here weren't all that well educated, and spelt words the way they sounded. The 'ise' words, for instance have a 'z' sound, so they spelt them with a 'z'. Centre sounds like it should be 'center', so they spelt that that way. And so on.

That's my theory, but the bottom line is that the only correct spellings are those that are normal in the place where you live. So 'centre' is correct over here, and 'center' is correct over there. I prefer 'center', but that's just my oddity.

Had world-wide super-fast communications not come to our aid recently, before long we'd have things like New Zealanders going to bid, instead of going to bed, because they pronounce it, and many other similar sounding words, as an 'i' and not an 'e'.

I think my memory is right but the U.S. has a different word for the past tense of 'spell', don't they? I think it's 'spelled' over there and never 'spelt'. So maybe this post won't make any sense over there lol. Or I might be thinking of 'spill'.

Edited by Phil Deakins

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30 minutes ago, Phil Deakins said:

I have a theory about the differences in spellings. It's just a theory.

The people who first populated North America from over here weren't all that well educated, and spelt words the way they sounded. The 'ise' words, for instance have a 'z' sound, so they spelt them with a 'z'. Centre sounds like it should be 'center', so they spelt that that way. And so on.

That's my theory, but the bottom line is that the only correct spellings are those that are normal in the place where you live. So 'centre' is correct over here, and 'center' is correct over there. I prefer 'center', but that's just my oddity.

Had world-wide super-fast communications not come to our aid recently, before long we'd have things like New Zealanders going to bid, instead of going to bed, because they pronounce it, and many other similar sounding words, as an 'i' and not an 'e'.

I think my memory is right but the U.S. has a different word for the past tense of 'spell', don't they? I think it's 'spelled' over there and never 'spelt'. So maybe this post won't make any sense over there lol. Or I might be thinking of 'spill'.

As of 1604, this was how an Englishman (Robert Cawdrey) described the book he had written to guide people in spelling, which was the first proto-dictionary of English:

"A table alphabeticall conteyning and teaching the true writing, and vnderstanding of hard usuall English words, borrowed from the Hebrew, Greeke, Latine, or French, &c. With the interpretation thereof by plaine English words, gathered for the benefit & helpe of ladies, gentlewomen, or any other vnskilfull persons. Whereby they may the more easilie and better vnderstand many hard English wordes, vvhich they shall heare or read in scriptures, sermons, or elswhere, and also be made able to vse the same aptly themselues."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_Alphabeticall

The first modern English dictionary (i.e. meant to be comprehensive, including definitions) was written by Samuel Johnson in 1755, long after the Colonies had been settled. He still used some archaic spellings like "publick", but obviously was more modern than Cawdrey.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Dictionary_of_the_English_Language

In the early 19th century Noah Webster, working in the United States, deliberately standardized the spellings of some English words and generally chose the spelling that was either closest to the common pronunciation of the time or was most efficient.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noah_Webster

 

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Since I wrote my previous post, I'd thought about how hard it is for us today to read the writings of yesteryear. That quotation from 1604 shows it perfectly :)

There's another 'olde worlde' word that I recently learned we all pronouce very wrongly - Ye - as in Ye Olde Worlde. Apparently they had no way of writing the 'th' sound when they used to write like that, so they used 'y' for it. To be correct, we should pronounce it as 'The Olde Worlde', and not 'Ye Olde Worlde' - but that would take a lot away from it for us.

Many languages don't have a 'th' sound in them, and tend to say 'd' in place of it.

Edited by Phil Deakins

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A little anecdote concerning spellings and SL...

When I started my low prim furniture store in 2007, I wanted to call it Prim Misers, but I wrongly assumed that the U.S. folks would spell 'misers' with a 'z', so I called it Prim Savers instead. It wasn't the best name due to temp-rezzers selling at that time. Two years later, a guy openned an inworld store selling low prim furniture under my SL business name - Prim Savers - presumably hoping to cash in on my store's success.

Then he applied for the trademark, and asked LL to stop me using my business name. He'd only applied for the mark, he didn't own it, so LL did nothing except inform me what he was up to. I could have prevented it by proving prior use but, for 2 reasons, I didn't. One was that it would cost me US$300, and the other was that, before he started up, I'd already decided to let the store fade away, and it had been in the process of winding down for a while. So I wasn't going to spend the US$300.

When he eventually got the trademark, I had to stop using the name, but I'd found that the U.S. doesn't use a 'z' in Misers, so I changed to what I wanted in the first place - Prim Misers :)

The story has an even nicer ending. The guy's inworld store didn't survive long - maybe not even a year. He had to go over to selling only on the marketplace. My inworld store continued for many years after that, all the time nicely profitable, but fading away, until eventually, last year, it finally stopped being profitable, and I closed it. It had lasted 10 years, most of them in the process of fading away.

ETA: Just out of interest, I thought I'd check to see if he still has the trademark, and Prim Savers isn't trademarked. I think it goes in 3 year periods, so he must have paid once and then let it lapse when his business failed.

Edited by Phil Deakins

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4 hours ago, Theresa Tennyson said:

As of 1604, this was how an Englishman (Robert Cawdrey) described the book he had written to guide people in spelling, which was the first proto-dictionary of English:

"A table alphabeticall conteyning and teaching the true writing, and vnderstanding of hard usuall English words, borrowed from the Hebrew, Greeke, Latine, or French, &c. With the interpretation thereof by plaine English words, gathered for the benefit & helpe of ladies, gentlewomen, or any other vnskilfull persons. Whereby they may the more easilie and better vnderstand many hard English wordes, vvhich they shall heare or read in scriptures, sermons, or elswhere, and also be made able to vse the same aptly themselues."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_Alphabeticall

The first modern English dictionary (i.e. meant to be comprehensive, including definitions) was written by Samuel Johnson in 1755, long after the Colonies had been settled. He still used some archaic spellings like "publick", but obviously was more modern than Cawdrey.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Dictionary_of_the_English_Language

In the early 19th century Noah Webster, working in the United States, deliberately standardized the spellings of some English words and generally chose the spelling that was either closest to the common pronunciation of the time or was most efficient.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noah_Webster

 

Theresa (and anyone else citing Wikipedia), I like you, I reeeally do, so please don't take this the wrong way. In all of my college classes, the one absolute common  thing we were told is that using Wikipedia as a fact source is never allowed, lol! On that note, I also don't doubt what you stated, no idea really, lol! :P

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14 minutes ago, Aislin Ceawlin said:

Theresa (and anyone else citing Wikipedia), I like you, I reeeally do, so please don't take this the wrong way. In all of my college classes, the one absolute common  thing we were told is that using Wikipedia as a fact source is never allowed, lol! On that note, I also don't doubt what you stated, no idea really, lol! :P

The things that we are allowed or not allowed to do in college do not "always" apply out in the real world.  Using the Wiki as a named source for a college or published paper is definitely something that shouldnt' be done, primarily because it is not a controlled source. While the Wiki cannot be considered 100% factual, it is also not completely wrong either.  It is often a good source to start with - and for some rather simple things, you don't really need to go further.  It totally depends on what you are looking up and why.

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Does Frank's have some sort of reputation that I don't know about? I've gone there a few times to stare at dresses and feel fancy, but if there's something funky going on then maybe I should stay away.

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2 hours ago, LittleMe Jewell said:

The things that we are allowed or not allowed to do in college do not "always" apply out in the real world.  Using the Wiki as a named source for a college or published paper is definitely something that shouldnt' be done, primarily because it is not a controlled source. While the Wiki cannot be considered 100% factual, it is also not completely wrong either.  It is often a good source to start with - and for some rather simple things, you don't really need to go further.  It totally depends on what you are looking up and why.

I know, I was just goofing. :$

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40 minutes ago, Kymrie said:

Does Frank's have some sort of reputation that I don't know about? I've gone there a few times to stare at dresses and feel fancy, but if there's something funky going on then maybe I should stay away.

It's a music style that caters to an older less diverse population than even the norm of SL. That tends to be the age and diversity demographic that also keeps Fox News in business. Frank's itself has no reputation that I know of... but that music style basically dates to when my grandparent's were over there fighting in WWII up until Castro kicked the CIA and Mafia out of Cuba.

 

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1 hour ago, Kymrie said:

Does Frank's have some sort of reputation that I don't know about? I've gone there a few times to stare at dresses and feel fancy, but if there's something funky going on then maybe I should stay away.

 

1 hour ago, Pussycat Catnap said:

It's a music style that caters to an older less diverse population than even the norm of SL.


Interesting - I've been there sometimes to dance, but always went with a partner.  However, as with much of my dancing in SL, I don't even actually listen to the music -- speakers turned off.  I'm there for the dancing animation while talking with my dance partner.  I'm actually not even sure I've ever heard the music there - unlike a few other places that I've danced at.

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Well, the group join fee for the 'Elite' venue is L$1000, plus the fact that the venue and possibly some of the clientele self-describe as 'elite'. Then there's the 'jazz', which is more the mainstream, 'acceptable' type (at least on the occasion I visited the non-elite club) sung by white men in Italian suits (yes, I'm generalising) - so a narrow range of music and atmosphere for a narrow range of demographic that may or may not be welcoming of folk who don't 'fit'.

Edited by LexxiXhan

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Oh, and it's laggy as hell (I had to crawl my way out of there), and therefore strictly reserved for those who can max out a gtx 1080 at 4k* :P

 

 

 

 

*whatever the hell that means...

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25 minutes ago, LexxiXhan said:

Then there's the 'jazz', which is more the mainstream, acceptable type (at least on the occasion I visited the non-elite club) sung by white men in Italian suits (yes, I'm generalising)

The 'variant jazz' instead of real original jazz. :ph34r:

People are always recommending jazz venues to me in SL when I tell them I'm having trouble finding places that aren't variations of rock, country, or metal. Frank's is why I don't bother. I've just assumed the other jazz is for that same demographic. That said... I'm not even a fan of any style of jazz... not my scene either way.

Jazz and Blues feel like what my mother and grandmother should be listening to... not me... :P

Edited by Pussycat Catnap
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