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St George's Day


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Seraphiel Galaxy wrote:

I'm just wondering if there are any events planned for the celebration of St George's Day in SL?  I can't see any listed so far.

St George and the Dragon.png


Isn't that on April 1? ;)

(Although, coming to think of it, what's more ridiculous about this fairy tale than all the other ones? Dragons are just as unbelievable as talking snakes and people who walk on water).

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Ishtara Rothschild wrote:


Seraphiel Galaxy wrote:

I'm just wondering if there are any events planned for the celebration of St George's Day in SL?  I can't see any listed so far.

St George and the Dragon.png


Isn't that on April 1?
;)

(Although, coming to think of it, what's more ridiculous about this fairy tale than all the other ones? Dragons are just as unbelievable as talking snakes and people who walk on water).

 

do you mind?

thats england's patron saint!

it was said that the dragon was actually a crocodile and that george killed the crocodile by a river in a valiant fight thus saving the villagers when they came to get water.

 

 

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Dogboat Taurog wrote:

 

do you mind?

thats england's patron saint!

it was said that the dragon was actually a crocodile and that george killed the crocodile by a river in a valiant fight thus saving the villagers when they came to get water. 

 

All legends are greatly exaggerated, if not completely made up. That's why it makes so little sense to revere them. It might as well be that ol'George became a local legend for standing up to his tyrannic wife back in the day :smileyvery-happy:

But lets say it was just a boring old crocodile. Don't you think they should change the legend, the paintings, and all the stained glass windows to show a crododile instead of a winged fantasy creature? I mean, we wouldn't want anyone to lie about the real life identity of the crocodile, or deceive people about the extent of Mr. George's heroic endeavours :P

PS: If I visit the local zoo and skewer a crocodile, can I be sainted too?

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Ishtara Rothschild wrote:


Dogboat Taurog wrote:

 

do you mind?

thats england's patron saint!

it was said that the dragon was actually a crocodile and that george killed the crocodile by a river in a valiant fight thus saving the villagers when they came to get water. 

 

All legends are greatly exaggerated, if not completely made up. That's why it makes so little sense to revere them. It might as well be that ol'George became a local legend for standing up to his tyrannic wife back in the day :smileyvery-happy:

But lets say it was just a boring old crocodile. Don't you think they should change the legend, the paintings, and all the stained glass windows to show a crododile instead of a winged fantasy creature? I mean, we wouldn't want anyone to lie about the real life identity of the crocodile, or deceive people about the extent of Mr. George's heroic endeavours
:P

PS: If I visit the local zoo and skewer a crocodile, can I be sainted too?

 

i have a dragon myself.

a bearded dragon, its a lizard from australia.

of course its not a real dragon but he looks a little like one without the wings...

Bearded Dragon1.jpg

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valerie Inshan wrote:

Jurassic Park? Nah... Australian common pet. :smileyvery-happy:

dragon-komodo.jpg


Now that is more like a dragon :) Interestingly, there was a giant komodo dragon species that lived on the Australian continent until ca. 40,000 years ago.

Megalania.jpg

Megalania prisca reached a length of 4.5 m (15 ft.) and was otherwise very similar to extant komodo dragons. Like its extant relatives, it will likely have killed prey as large as itself in order to satisfy its ravenous appetite. It probably also had venom glands like modern komodo dragons, which made it even deadlier.

When the first humans made it to Australia from Southeast Asia, these giant and deadly lizards were still around. This was probably as close as mankind ever got to living alongside dinosaurs :) Or alongside dragons, for that matter. And there is little doubt that Megalania hunted and killed the ancestors of the Indigenous Australians.

megalania1mm1.jpg

nom.jpg

Imagine a beast of that size, as fast as a big cat and as venomous as a snake. A single bite was already a death sentence, even if the prey managed to get away. But these people were as resourceful as any Homo sapiens population. There was only one weapon that could kill such a beast, and those early modern humans had long discovered it.

Their weapon was actually quite simple. There is strong evidence for an unnatural amount of forest and prairie fires that coincides with the earliest human remains that were found on the Australian continent. These humans stayed close to the coast, since the sea provided them with food, and simply burned down the bushland and forests where Megalania used to hide and prey on its victims.

Another reason for them to burn down all vegetation was probably that it provided them with an easy and crispy food source :) They could have waited for the fires to die out and picked up all the unfortunate animals that didn't run fast enough. This extensive use of fire as a weapon and a tool forever changed the Australian landscape.

Needless to say that this also caused a major Australian extinction event. Countless marsupial and bird species died out back then. But humans came out on top of things. Literally :) They advanced to the top of the food chain, just as they did in Eurasia and the Americas, and became the most successful predator on Earth.

In other words, these prehistoric humans were the real St. Georges :) Despite my mockery in an earlier post, humans really did slay dragons back in the day. But the legends have it the wrong way around. It wasn't the dragons who breathed fire, it was us.

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