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Ah the metro uk (owned by the same 'people' who erm publish the daily mail) instant hairball response right there so pretty much self identify as a cat person. (Not to be confused with the other Metro free rag).

Lord Rothermere would approve no doubt.

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Abstract
Behavioral patterns, including sexual behavioral patterns, are usually understood as biological adaptations increasing the fitness of their carriers. Many parasites, so-called manipulators, are known to induce changes in the behavior of their hosts to increase their own fitness. Such changes are also induced by a parasite of cats, Toxoplasma  gondii. The most remarkable change is the fatal attraction phenomenon, the switch of infected mice’s and rat’s native fear of the smell of cats toward an attraction to this smell. The stimuli that activate fear-related circuits in healthy rodents start to also activate sex-related circuits in the infected animals. An  analogy  of  the  fatal  attraction  phenomenon  has  also  been  observed  in  infected  humans.  Therefore,  we  tried  to  test  a hypothesis that sexual arousal by fear-, violence-, and danger-related stimuli occurs more frequently in Toxoplasma infected subjects. A cross-sectional cohort study performed on 36,564 subjects (5,087 Toxoplasma free and 741 Toxoplasma infected) showed that infected and noninfected subjects differ in their sexual behavior, fantasies, and preferences when age, health, and the size of the place where they spent childhood were controlled (F (24, 3719) ¼ 2.800, p < .0001). In agreement with our a priori hypothesis, infected subjects are more often aroused by their own fear, danger, and sexual submission although they practice more conventional sexual activities than Toxoplasma -free subjects. We suggest that the later changes can be related to a decrease in the personality trait of novelty seeking in infected subjects, which is potentially a side effect of increased concentration of dopamine in their brain.

So if you have cats you are likely to have a parasite that causes deviant fantasies but you are more likely to engage in deviant sexual activities if you don't have the parasite.  Is that what they seem to be saying to anyone else? 

It makes you sexually attracted to danger but decreases the desire to be sexually attracted to danger.  Yeah.  OK. 

Edited by Rhonda Huntress
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24 minutes ago, Rhonda Huntress said:

a decrease in the personality trait of novelty seeking in infected subjects 

So like when he says "Honey I heard of this great new restaurant", and I want to say no before he even explains it to me, that is my kitties fault?

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4 hours ago, Ivanova Shostakovich said:

Can anyone here who owns at least one cat honestly say that it isn't all about submission?

I have friends who would insist that all human interaction is about the Power Exchange and Dominance or Submission.

They worry too much :-)

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5 hours ago, Ivanova Shostakovich said:

Can anyone here who owns at least one cat honestly say that it isn't all about submission?

I had a cat. It was more about capitulation until I learned to fight indifference with simulated prey movements. Then it was more about inciting violence.

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27 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

I had a cat. It was more about capitulation until I learned to fight indifference with simulated prey movements. Then it was more about inciting violence.

   I have a cat now who's still very young. The capitulation, or submission, right now is playing with her frequently, simulating prey movements flicking balls of paper across the room, so as to avoid having my legs sneak attacked in the dark. The cat I had before her lived to be 21 years old. At her end, the surrender was an emotional one.

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57 minutes ago, Ivanova Shostakovich said:

   I have a cat now who's still very young. The capitulation, or submission, right now is playing with her frequently, simulating prey movements flicking balls of paper across the room, so as to avoid having my legs sneak attacked in the dark. The cat I had before her lived to be 21 years old. At her end, the surrender was an emotional one.

When my longtime black-cat housemate finally passed, it took me a long time to even think about another. Reguardless of whether I was infected with some obscure cat-illness or just had a little fuzzy soulmate, I was very happy with Snowball. (My daughter named her).

I grieved less over my divorce than over her finally heading to the Afterfields.

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11 hours ago, Ivanova Shostakovich said:

Can anyone here who owns at least one cat honestly say that it isn't all about submission?

Owns a cat? Giggle. No, no, no. The cat has decided to allow you to look after it's needs. Like any good subby should.

One is always blessed to allow them into our lives, and hearts.

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