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JamesKisson

The Pathetic State of RP in SL

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4 hours ago, Skell Dagger said:

Bingo.

Everyone wants to be special and nobody wants to explore what they percieve as "common and boring". When my partner and I used to roleplay in SL, more often than not we would deliberately pick the "common and boring" options, because those were the ones we could have more fun with. And, more often than not, those roles were underdogs and thieves. But the trouble with playing those kinds of role - no matter how much fun we had between ourselves and the very, very few people who also played them - was that the vast majority of other players wouldn't deign to descend from their castles - both literal and figurative - to roleplay with us.

I think out of all the places I've roleplayed, only once did I play a so-called important role. Otherwise I've always been the assassin for hire skulking at the bar (while the ruler and her huge entourage stayed in the palace), the human freedom fighter in a world of vampires and werewolves who were only interested in how many humans they could capture and lock in dungeons (thereby preventing them from roleplaying; once in the dungeon nobody went near you), the thief prowling the streets at night (while everyone stayed locked up and OOC in their rental homes), etc.

It's really no wonder we stopped roleplaying.

I think the core problem is that many people play a role rather than a character. They don't bother with any personality, and just play a combination of stereotypical race/gender/title/class traits instead. That's not inherently a problem; until you combine it with a natural desire to be the centre of attention. Those people want to be unique and important through what they are, rather than becoming memorable through what they do. And when you have a whole group/party/sim/team of unique, special, destined-for-greatness snowflakes, no one has the time to care as they're focusing on their own magnificent destiny. This isn't just an SL problem, it affects almost every roleplaying group/system/game/whatever out there.

My favourite roleplaying experience was the time I played "Baby Stabbin' Steve" the human rogue, in a wine-fuelled DnD game I played with my housemates at uni. The character was essentially Bronn from Game of Thrones; no dark edginess, not a psychopath, just a nobody from some slum who prefers staying alive over any moral stance. The rest of the party was similarly grounded (as in, no special unique royalty/half demons/anime protagonists), and all of our memorable moments came from the shenanigans we got up to, rather than any pretentious backstories or racial features.

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   My favourite role playing character was a Kenku warlock in D&D. Not being able to speak freely wasn't as much an impairment as it was fun - our DM made sure that my character was the one to go out and find the other players around town, and convince them to come along to our first 'quest giver'. Well, when you're an anthropomorphic raven in tattered robes and a bunch of nasty-looking trinkets, you're forced to come up with creative solutions of getting people to follow - like snatching something out of their hands or tossing pebbles at them to make them run after you, or just grabbing someone by their tail and dragging them along. Also cawing 'fetch!', as the quest giver asked me to 'fetch the adventurers' helped a little. Except when I was throwing pebbles, that almost got me into a fight.

   In SL, the few times I've bothered to get into an RP sim, I've gotten bored quickly enough by the 'nobles' and 'jedis' trying to constantly come off as being better. It's especially annoying when the player behind them completely lack the eloquence expected of their character. "I have a +5 int applier, hurr durr, I'mma do smart stuffs".

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4 hours ago, Akane Nacht said:

I used to play at sim called Kingdom of Sand years ago. We'd run wild, picking fights or cooking up magical catastrophes or kidnappings of princes/princesses every day. It was completely random yet people just rolled with it and almost never broke character (at least the ones I roleplayed with). It was perfect for those of us who could only pop in for an hour or two to play, as we didn't miss any big plot twists. There wasn't really a plot.
Over the last few years, roleplay seems to have morphed from interactive improv to fan-fiction. Not sure why, but people just don't seem to want to incorporate randomness into their storylines anymore.

OMG I remember Kingdom of Sand (Still have my old system avatar and costume I used for it) :)

The only other place that works that way is where I've been roleplaying lately, but the genre isn't as exciting I suppose (historical wild west in the states, circa 1870s) because it's also a pretty dearth of roleplayers around. But it is historical pioneer days of the wild west, so a lot of solo horseriding is just fine and when you do run into others anything can happen (especially between Native Americans and Settlers) - I'm doing the Apache thing and gee-willickers, Batman it can be dangerous leaving the desert! LOL

But alas, the general sentiments expressed in the old OP and current replies are pretty much status quo. But a good excuse to ride me Animesh horses alot. :)

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In my eyes, a good roleplay sim/setting would be managed and restricted roles. Allow the special power roles only be filled in by the experienced "management team" and they have only little actual appearances and activity in the story. Or maybe open a certain amount of positions, and if that is filled, to bad, you can join, but not be High Lord Fancycastle McKnight the 3rd, since we only have room for the first two.

18 hours ago, AyelaNewLife said:

My favourite roleplaying experience was the time I played "Baby Stabbin' Steve" the human rogue, in a wine-fuelled DnD game I played with my housemates at uni. The character was essentially Bronn from Game of Thrones; no dark edginess, not a psychopath, just a nobody from some slum who prefers staying alive over any moral stance. The rest of the party was similarly grounded (as in, no special unique royalty/half demons/anime protagonists), and all of our memorable moments came from the shenanigans we got up to, rather than any pretentious backstories or racial features.

So much this. These roles are worth playing and fun. They allow much more interesting and varying play styles and interactions. They are also the ones that are fun and interesting in TV series, like Bronn.

My only RP experiences comes form Ultima Online, about 20 years ago. The game itself had a nice story and background, and the roleplaying communities where much more centered around "realism". Of course there where some power characters, but they were in check by the guild leaders, most members where just ordinary people growing in a role. Could be they joined up a militia as foot soldier, and during their play advanced and end up being a high ranking officer, or maybe get knighted, or get recruited by an evil or opposing faction and go on a different direction. But no one joining started out instantly as super bad ass. They all start somewhere common and can grow in a role they desire (or just stay commoner), fitting to the roleplay setting and their play style and skills.

A setting like that in SL, I would sign up right away.

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10 minutes ago, Zeta Vandyke said:

In my eyes, a good roleplay sim/setting would be managed and restricted roles.

It pains me to say it, but in my experience, this really is the best way to avoid drama and other nonsense that ruins a sim, much as I love the idea and theory of totally freestyle RP.  (Waves to the other Kingdom of Sand old-timers. Wasn't it great? Until it drowned in prim/script overload, a tidal wave of drama, metagaming and stupidity and, of course, Goreans who couldn't understand that a sim could be capture/combat/belly dance costume enabled and still not actually be the sodding farking beggaring b*starding bell ended accursed Counter Earth. Don't suppose Kora is still active somehow, is she? I couldn't find her profile.)

The sims where I found the most sustained, drama-free and coherent, satisfying stories were indeed those ones with set, restricted roles, and auditions to play. It meant that people had a common goal in RPing (plots with defined characters, not personal wish fulfilment), nobody took anything personally since we were quite explicitly playing characters other than ourselves and everyone got their turn at being the pivotal figure. Comic book sims were especially good for this, I found, probably since they had such well-known, distinctive characters. Everyone had proven that they could RP to a reasonable standard and understood the principles (no god modding or metagaming and so on). We'd also get together frequently for OOC chat, so we were all friends, and that really helped things too. There were mods, but they very rarely needed to call upon their powers. 

I've always thought that having experience of round-the-table, old school RP games is a great advantage, and the posts here seem to support that. One thing that got me into RPing in SL was that I had moved and could not find anywhere for tabletop gaming in my new city.

I really do love the idea of freestyle, totally inclusive RP but time and time again I saw it fail, even in the most exquisite and sophisticated sims, for the same few reasons. 

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49 minutes ago, Zeta Vandyke said:

In my eyes, a good roleplay sim/setting would be managed and restricted roles. Allow the special power roles only be filled in by the experienced "management team" and they have only little actual appearances and activity in the story. Or maybe open a certain amount of positions, and if that is filled, to bad, you can join, but not be High Lord Fancycastle McKnight the 3rd, since we only have room for the first two.

This entire sentence is key. 

How many times have we seen sadposting about RP sims that are nothing more than an excuse for the moderation team to live out their fantasies? Where the owners and a select group of their friends hold all the power and influence and storyline-critical roles, expecting The Great Unwashed to just fill in the gaps around them? 

To make this work, you'd need an owner/moderator who is prepared to either roleplay very hands-off, mostly just there to make appearances at events and to resolve disputes in-character; potentially roleplaying a "normal character" on an alt and maintaining sufficient separation between the two. But if you can find someone/a team of people willing to do just that without letting things spiral out of control, it could work amazingly.

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2 hours ago, Zeta Vandyke said:

In my eyes, a good roleplay sim/setting would be managed and restricted roles. Allow the special power roles only be filled in by the experienced "management team" and they have only little actual appearances and activity in the story.

   I've seen this go so wrong, though. The sim owner without discretion being a key figure gone power mad isn't a pretty sight.

   To be perfectly blunt, any case where any individual holds some OOC leverage and there's an IC conflict can go terribly wrong. Roleplay should either be entirely free-for-all, or it should have dedicated storytellers and game masters to ensure that participants are treated justly. I'd love to do that, being a DM can be really fun when you've got immersed players; but it also means it won't be available 24/7, and having a sim stand empty most of the day is prohibitively expensive.

   Second Life has a lot of potential for creating good RP settings, but it isn't optimized for it, especially not if people expect everything to actually be rendered and cinematized in real-time. At least that's what it seems that most sims aim for, and I don't think that's a rational approach to it. It's better to just have a setting, and let people interact with it and each other freely, or that a group of people decide on a time and a place for an RP session led by a DM. Heck, just using SL as a platform to play actual D&D would work fine - just cosplay your character through your avatar, sit around a table with a set of dice, use the in-world chat for voice or text communication and have your character sheets shared either through a third party communication platform like Skype or Discord, or even just upload the sheet as a texture and put it on a prim.

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11 minutes ago, Orwar said:

I've seen this go so wrong, though. The sim owner without discretion being a key figure gone power mad isn't a pretty sight.

I don't think there's any setting in SL (or any game with leaders involved) that would prevent this. There will always be a key user that is in lead. Be it a sim owner, group admin, DM. Someone will technically hold more power than others. That's a risk you will have to take.

To minimize the impact and chance of that person going power mad, is by not having that same person actively play their ruler/powerful character. This character should be for certain occasions, and background story, preferable an alt. Their main playing avie should be just as common as all the other players. No special role. Still, they can abuse their power of controlling the top dog character, but again, that's a risk you have to take in any setting.

Even a tabletop dungeon master can have the pick on someone participating, or maybe have a favorite, influencing their decisions on the games progress.

17 minutes ago, Orwar said:

but it also means it won't be available 24/7, and having a sim stand empty most of the day is prohibitively expensive.

Progressing trough story lines require the active players/organizers to be present. But in a sim I would expect I can go anytime, and when there's no story active, just walk in a bar and have a chat, meet people, do my job, or anything else. Some of the most fun RP moments I had were during those silly banter moments, outside of events and story arcs.

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3 minutes ago, Zeta Vandyke said:

Progressing trough story lines require the active players/organizers to be present. But in a sim I would expect I can go anytime, and when there's no story active, just walk in a bar and have a chat, meet people, do my job, or anything else. Some of the most fun RP moments I had were during those silly banter moments, outside of events and story arcs.

   That reminds me of another downside of RP sims in SL. Suddenly there's a dozen people in a scene, and a lap around the PO can take 90 minutes as everyone goes semi-AFK and no one has the decency to compose their post whilst waiting their turn, at which point everyone lose their attention and the next lap around the PO takes 150 minutes. More reasons to just compose a dedicated RP group and have at it.

   Sure, the casual bar chatter can be amusing if people put good characters into it - but it can also just be a dreary session of someone obsessing over their 250-page backstory that basically is a bastardized amalgamation of Bilbo, Jack Sparrow and the Beast (from Beauty and the Beast) with a few dashes of the Mad Hatter and Thrall.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Orwar said:

but it can also just be a dreary session of someone obsessing over their 250-page backstory

Yeah but like in real life you can escape non interesting people in the bar with made up excuses: Oh, is it that time already, I have to go! I left my three baby dragons, Harry, Dumbledore and Voldemort, who I hatched in the fires of mount doom, and they need to be fed or they will break down my ship, the Black Pearl! Was so nice meeting you, got to go now, bye bye!

 

Edited by Zeta Vandyke
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3 minutes ago, Zeta Vandyke said:

Yeah but like in real life you can escape non interesting people in the bar with made up excuses: Oh, is it that time already, I have to go! I left my three baby dragons, Harry, Dumbledore and Voldemort, who I hatched in the fires of mount doom, and they need to be fed or they will break down my ship, the Black Pearl! Was so nice meeting you, got to go now, bye bye!

   In real life, if a conversation bores me, I just phase out. The other day, I was sitting on a bench with some class mates who were talking girly stuff, so I looked to the lake and went off to lala-land - when I came to, one of them was waving a knife in my face. Apparently she'd found a box cutter in her pocket that she'd forgot to put back in the workshop, and started playing with it, and thought it hilarious that I didn't bat an eye when she extended the knife fully and pointed it towards me.

   In Second Life, I do much the same, except I just go to YouTube.

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8 hours ago, Orwar said:

   That reminds me of another downside of RP sims in SL. Suddenly there's a dozen people in a scene, and a lap around the PO can take 90 minutes as everyone goes semi-AFK and no one has the decency to compose their post whilst waiting their turn, at which point everyone lose their attention and the next lap around the PO takes 150 minutes. More reasons to just compose a dedicated RP group and have at it.

I'm clearly out of touch, what does PO stand for in this context? I can't find an answer online.

If we were taking it in turns around the circle, I wouldn't compose my post too far ahead, as I'd want to be responsive to what others do. Actually in the SL RP I've done, we wouldn't tend to take turns as such...we'd just interact as and when it seemed natural and organic. Obviously one has to be careful not to hog the floor but if you're an experienced RPer, or at least a considerate one, that isn't hard.

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18 minutes ago, Amina Sopwith said:

I'm clearly out of touch, what does PO stand for in this context? I can't find an answer online.

   Post Order, i.e. pretty much what you described.

   Not having a post order in SL RP, or any online RP with a lot of people involved, quickly gets chaotic as people type over each other, which frequently leads to OOC retconning premature responses. It also can lead to people feeling as if they have no impact or attention in a scene. Roleplay is a social activity, having people feeling left out or ignored doesn't make for a very nice atmosphere. Even as a third party, seeing someone trying to interact with one person, who blatantly ignores them because they're too focused on what they're doing to someone else, it makes the whole thing feel just 'meh'. New people arriving to a sim with an established community (and hierarchy) especially can have a very hard time with it.

   And sure, you can start typing your post half-way through the PO, then at least you have something, which you can then edit as needed, until it's your turn to post. If everyone is to go from 0-100 when the turn reaches them, and especially with people who think that quantity of text is of importance (which in my opinion is just absurd - self-proclaimed 'para-RPers' are the worst) can grind a scene to an absolute halt. I've been in scenes where the PO was unlimited, and we ended up with someone typing for 35 minutes, taking even longer to copy-paste to squeeze in some bracketed 'still here!' and 'typing, soon done!'. Having a PO with a timer (depending on the amount of participants) and someone taking responsibility to keep things going is just a good tool - I've both participated and hosted in online RP events with 40+ people (117 for a tournament, which I luckily didn't have to host), all emoting and rolling dice, where it was absolutely invaluable to keep things structured.

   But it's up to the participants; if you've got a half dozen people sitting around a bar just socializing and story building, it's usually not a necessity. I've seen people 'hog the floor' in one on one RP, too - there's all sorts. Whenever there's a Mary Sue in the group and I DM, I tend to get them into trouble just to make sure that the other participants get some breathing room. I've had hilarious backlashes where they'd up and leave because things weren't going their way, which can either leave the room dead silent or you can get a collective sigh of relief. Usually the latter. Either tends to beat having someone drone on about how they've min-maxed their stats so that failure 'should be impossible' (especially if it's charisma, and they're absolute buffoons who couldn't act charming to save their children - had a guy straight up tell a NPC nobleman that he was an inhospitable *****, and then get surprised when the nobleman ordered his retainers to throw the group out on their rears in spite of his 18 charisma; no, you don't get a dice roll from me at that point).

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Orwar said:

     Not having a post order in SL RP, or any online RP with a lot of people involved, quickly gets chaotic as people type over each other, which frequently leads to OOC retconning premature responses. It also can lead to people feeling as if they have no impact or attention in a scene. Roleplay is a social activity, having people feeling left out or ignored doesn't make for a very nice atmosphere. Even as a third party, seeing someone trying to interact with one person, who blatantly ignores them because they're too focused on what they're doing to someone else, it makes the whole thing feel just 'meh'. 

That's definitely annoying, but the PO alternative also carries the risk that you outlined in your post: everything going into unbearable slow motion. (Seriously, 35 minutes to compose one post? I'd have assumed that the entire sim had evolved into a new species by then, thus rendering everything irrelevant.) Having a limit on typing time is one solution but if you've got that many people in one scene, it's still going to be slow. The only massive group RPs I've been in where everyone was acting along the same common narrative were raids and huge fight scenes. Otherwise, it was mostly several individual exchanges going on at once which sometimes bounced off each other. It could get a bit complex trying to look out for the post from the people in your particular conversation, but I actually quite liked that...felt a bit more true to the experience of being a small group in a massive hubbub. If it became really unbearable, we could always cluster together and start an IC private chat. I guess a DM-style like the one you mentioned for huge groups that all want to be playing the same story would be beneficial, but it still sounds very slow. 

Para RP is a divisive topic, I know. Personally I don't mind it if it's done well but it definitely works best in smaller groups, or preferably one on one. It does have a tendency to be abused by people trying to shoehorn in an irrelevant backstory or inner monologue.

Ultimately, there's just no substitute for having a common RP goal (i.e., interactive storytelling involving everyone) and some consideration. I'm a fast reader and typist and there were lots of occasions where it would have been very easy for me to dominate a scene unfairly, so I deliberately wound it back. I'd be sure to respond to and interact with people who might otherwise be bypassed in a scene, though. 

Poor RP is usually inconsiderate RP, and inconsiderate RPers usually find a way to push their agenda whatever form you use. Having restricted roles available on audition was good at weeding out inconsiderate RPers and also meant we never had a group scene that was so large we couldn't handle it ourselves. Also meant that we understood we were playing characters, not ourselves, so we didn't have the 18 charisma Basil Fawlty either...


 

Edited by Amina Sopwith
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9 hours ago, Amina Sopwith said:

Para RP is a divisive topic, I know. Personally I don't mind it if it's done well but it definitely works best in smaller groups, or preferably one on one. It does have a tendency to be abused by people trying to shoehorn in an irrelevant backstory or inner monologue.

^ THIS.

Role Play, especially Para RP, seems to be littered with people who take upwards of 10+ minutes to post and add nothing to the story or drive the plot forward; they'd rather explain or justify motivations or childhood traumas that characters cannot directly respond or react to since it's all thought-posts and not verbalized.

This is not the same as; show, don't tell. Few writers seem to make use of subtle queues; a raised brow, restless movements; all of which can suggest motives that don't actually need to be said. That kind of writing can in itself provoke RP as characters work to discover why, but all too often is overlooked by lazy writers who don't want to give others a chance to decipher for themselves (and perhaps guess wrongly - that is, they have an agenda or idea on how they see the story progressing and so push in that direction). There is the risk of course that too much "vagueness" in itself is just as bad as too much detail and will, if misused, derail a thread and slow the plot if not hijack it altogether. When you couple that with the overwhelming need the majority seem to have to be center stage its a wonder RP moves at all.

I want to add as well that despite the fact there are, generally speaking, three main rules to role play regardless the format (No Metagame, No Power Play, No God Mod), there seems to be as many interpretations to them as there are people role playing, so you don't ever get any real consistency unless perhaps the RP is one on one. This can also murky the waters and make for bad role play. 

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1 hour ago, RaeLeeH said:

I want to add as well that despite the fact there are, generally speaking, three main rules to role play regardless the format (No Metagame, No Power Play, No God Mod), there seems to be as many interpretations to them as there are people role playing, so you don't ever get any real consistency unless perhaps the RP is one on one. This can also murky the waters and make for bad role play. 

   The 'pillars' of RP, as some call those rules, can vary a lot in number and interpretation. A fourth that's been quite common in settings I've played in, has been 'No lore-break/rape'; usually in established universes such as Star Wars, Star Trek, Stargate, Warcraft, Middle Earth, where the setting is very clearly one thing, there still are people who say 'But I want to be a mermaid', or 'I can be a vampire in Middle Earth, because vampires aren't a race, it's a curse, so Tolkien not mentioning it doesn't mean it can't exist'.

   There's also the para-meta rule, which I personally like. Whereas meta-gaming = your character using information or knowledge acquired by its player out of character, para-meta = the player trying to rely on their character knowing what to do in a certain situation. Example:

  • DM: As you enter the crypt, you see a creature within; it's humanoid, but with a tall and slender frame, wrapped in tattered robes and floating at the center of the structure, its facial features concealed by a draping hood. It doesn't appear alarmed by your entry, it might not have even noticed you.
  • Mage: Is it immune to fire damage?
  • DM: Huh? Uh, maybe? I can't tell you that.
  • Mage: Yeah but I'm like, a wizard, so I should know, right?
  • DM: Err.. How?
  • Mage: My character is a 60-something year old mage, I'm sure he's dealt with this stuff in the past, or at least read about it in a book.
  • DM: You're level two...
  • Warrior: Guys, we haven't even established whether it's an enemy yet. Maybe we should talk to it?
  • Rogue: Okay, but first I want to have a roll at picking its pockets.
  • Cleric: Yeah, I don't think a failed pickpocket attempt would make for a particularly good introduction with something that's high enough level to levitate whilst basically AFK, can we please move things along - my mom's picking me up in 30 minutes.
  • Mage: Okay. Cast Fireball.
  • DM: .. Fireball? You're inside of a small--
  • Mage: I didn't ask how big the room was, I said cast fireball.

   Well. The first line. I may have gotten a little carried away.

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had to put my two cents into this thread

I have the fortune(misfortune) of being a realplayer rather than a roleplayer. I've often been referred to as a soulplayer - which I found to be super nice.

Whenever I roleplay, I roleplay as myself. I transcend myself as I am into that specific universe I find myself in and I adjust certain aspects according to the rules of the sim, however I never change my "core". This, I found to be very difficult and is rarely long lasting. A vast majority of users (that I have come across) almost instantly chicken out on me or provide the cold shoulder as soon as they learn that they roleplay with me, as I am in any worlds. 

This struggle can certainly be avoided - yes, it is a choice not to create a character but rather to reinvent myself over and over. I'd choose it a thousand times over because it is what clicks for me, what drives me further.  

I did try at times to create fictional characters whose IC actions had nothing to do with my own personality, but it always turned out awry and cringy to say the least.

These days I mingle, I sit in an obvious corner and wait. I respond to any IMs because you can never know what could come out of it. ^^

But yea, RP does miss "soul" a lot, at least in my experiences.

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57 minutes ago, Orwar said:

   The 'pillars' of RP, as some call those rules, can vary a lot in number and interpretation. A fourth that's been quite common in settings I've played in, has been 'No lore-break/rape'; usually in established universes such as Star Wars, Star Trek, Stargate, Warcraft, Middle Earth, where the setting is very clearly one thing, there still are people who say 'But I want to be a mermaid', or 'I can be a vampire in Middle Earth, because vampires aren't a race, it's a curse, so Tolkien not mentioning it doesn't mean it can't exist'.

Not to nitpick but Tolkien actually did mention a vampire and a werewolf in the tale of Beren and Lúthien. :)

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43 minutes ago, ErukaVonD said:

Whenever I roleplay, I roleplay as myself. I transcend myself as I am into that specific universe I find myself in and I adjust certain aspects according to the rules of the sim, however I never change my "core". This, I found to be very difficult and is rarely long lasting. A vast majority of users (that I have come across) almost instantly chicken out on me or provide the cold shoulder as soon as they learn that they roleplay with me, as I am in any worlds. 

I admire your self awareness...many people RP this way but deny it. It is of course your choice to play this way but for the sake of avoiding drama and other problems, it's important to make enough of a distinction between the "you" in the RP setting and the "you" outside of it. RPers are likely to treat or respond to you in a way that isn't best pleasing or complimentary (they are usually playing characters) and you mustn't take this personally. Most people find this hard if they are indeed being themselves in the setting but if you can do it, great.

I don't find it too hard to take on a different persona. It just feels like I'm writing a character in a story.

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1 hour ago, ErukaVonD said:

IWhenever I roleplay, I roleplay as myself. I transcend myself as I am into that specific universe I find myself in and I adjust certain aspects according to the rules of the sim, however I never change my "core"

this is how I do it as well.  In this story, then how would I relate to it were I of that context/time/period/world/line/scene

i don't do much RP anymore but when I do is usually after having a bit of a chat with a person and we get on to the subject. When so then I say that I do improv

which typically means me telling them to start their story line, and I will join in, and we see where it goes.  My only guide rule with doing mprov is that the other person cannot emote/tell me what I am thinking, .what I am feeling, or how I am responding. Nor me, them.  

improv can get pretty deep and interesting when with a person who is also a storyteller

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On 11/15/2016 at 1:41 PM, JamesKisson said:

I have to vent, I NEED to vent.  I should have run from SL years ago, having been here for over 6 years.  And I can count on one hand friends made, friends who know how to RP as well, intelligent, dedicated, funny friends who I would have over for dinner in a heartbeat if they lived in my part of the world.  And....I can count on all my fingers and toes and times that by 100 of the people I have met who;

A.) Think SL is some sort of RL dating service, and how many people lead other people on via lies and promises that never could become reality.

B.) Think SL is a place to offer their -all look the same- barbie doll/jiggly boob n butt bodies for lindens in exchange for the most oooh ahh moan moan boring sex in the world.  Trust me, internet porn is much better, and FREE and..well, faster.

C.) Suffer a major psychological disorder and or physical one and have come into SL to poor poor me cry and moan to people who uh huh them and do not give 2 sh*ts...just get on that poseball honey so I can come and go.

D.) Are obviously underage-points EVERYWHERE.  Or think that babies should have sex. *Points at a few of the nude family beaches*  Spend a day at one of those sims and I will guaaareeenteeee you will have no less that 5 *littles* hit on you in a very adult fashion.  Same thing for the adoption agencies and see how many pervs you get who wish to rape your childlike pixels, or how many want to predend they are daddies or mommies to a  little girl or boy, or..dog. To hell with it being a violation of TOS, its DONE EVERYWHERE. And if the littles are not looking for sex, they are looking for lindens.

E.) Gor/BDSM-The BDSM sims hate RPers and the Goreans are Living BDSM.  Most Gor sims are empty, and if you do find one that contains people, you will find that they are clicks of friends, or just really bad or fanatical with 0 character developement.  Norman laughs out there somewhere at everyone who took his books THAT seriously, and when you really look how and what the Gorean books reflected in their writing, well, it is just kool aid for fanatics...can't say its not fun but how many slave serves can one person tolerate without a conversation that goes beyond if I wish my paga warm or my ka-la-na chilled.  And ad to that..in all of SL you will find this....

F.) People who have NO CLUE what a capitol letter is, proper 3rd  person emoting is, nor how to use punctuation and painfully slow typers. Again they are dependant on their mesh bodies, male or female and yes I sport a mesh body as well.  *I touch you hey sup u look hot wanna fck ^^* is NOT RP. Its BS by deperate poseballers  Many need to get OFF SL and try a few high school lvl English courses and stay awake though them. Then try some college lvl creative writing courses. WORSE than that..TEXT SPEAK in RP. Its EVERYWHERE.

G.) I have nothing against furries, except to say they are all in the 14-21 age group and tail wagging or being in heat, having 6 mipples or a barbed peen does not exactly make for intriguing RP.  Most fur sims are dedicated to sitting around chatting it up and panting. Ugh.

H.) Greedy? Skipo?  On every sim, even the RP ones. WHY?  I can think of much better games to play that only require one to click OFF SL. And those games, have nothing to do with RP. Or communication.

That out of the way, having done both Urban and Gor I can say I have found legit and well versed RPers on some of the larger Urban sims. But again, rarely is it an exchange that goes beyond a day, with no continued story. And the price paid for that, in those multi sim places is extreme lag.  Gor is pretty much a joke, with some serious RPers and many pseudo slaves just looking for poseballing. I have heard some of the western themed sims are fun, but I, personally only can go on the word of friends. And Sci Fi I'm sure is in the same state of low quality role play, just add in a few tentacals and space suits. As someone who has RPed in MMORPGs as well as just text based RP, I have to say, second life is the sewer of RP.

I do believe the defintion of crazy, is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting differnt results but not getting them.  Now I'm sure a few will follow this post with, -well damn you have just been in the wrong places-, or, -who peed in your pie-. If so, do enlighten me to where the real, creative, active RP sims are. I have spent nights visiting as many as 30-40 sims and finding all of 6 people, and if I am REALLY lucky, 1 can RP.  I'd have better odds winning the lotto.

 

Have I given up on finding mature RP with other like minded adults who understand the english language, even if using a translator, who are over the age of 30, or 40?  Probably not.  Though I'm finding that perhaps my time is better served in other venues. SL could be a GREAT world for RP of many genres.  But, its not.  Its Sex life, its BDSM life (most who have not a clue what the RL version of that is) and it is Pose Ball life with people/avis you will never see again, or only see again when they need to take care of their sexual needs again.  And that, makes me sad, and regret all the money I have spent there.  I would love to hear other people's takes on their RP experience...ONLY if you can type in complete sentences with capitol letters and periods!

You need a little less sodium in your diet.

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10 hours ago, RaeLeeH said:

I want to add as well that despite the fact there are, generally speaking, three main rules to role play regardless the format (No Metagame, No Power Play, No God Mod), there seems to be as many interpretations to them as there are people role playing, so you don't ever get any real consistency unless perhaps the RP is one on one. This can also murky the waters and make for bad role play. 

Which is another case for restricted roles, gained by audition. It just helps to make it a bit more likely that you'll all be on the same page with regards to these three main tenets. 
 

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6 hours ago, Amina Sopwith said:

Which is another case for restricted roles, gained by audition. It just helps to make it a bit more likely that you'll all be on the same page with regards to these three main tenets. 

Agreed. Then there are those who really don't want to be auditioned because they feel entitled to the role. They've done it, or there's no one else to do it, and then there's the OOC politics of nepotism. While one could argue the case for 'then they don't get the role/wait until someone more suitable comes along', meanwhile the story meanders, suffers, and on drastic occasions completely dies while the rest are left waiting. It would be ideal to have all the canon characters set in place before the story rolls, and have understudies/a back-up for those roles for when RL pops up and certain people just can't be there as needed. But this isn't drama school. Most people don't want to be second choice. And RL has this nasty habit of intervening, calling people away, crashing internet connections, and anything else that can possibly stop the flow, not to mention the disruption of time zone clashes.

In my experience audition is good in other platforms, tabletop RP being the primary one, text-based writing forums another. But here in SL things haven't gone anywhere near as smoothly, at least those times I've attempted it. Add to that the transient nature of the general role player who wants their few moments in the sun before they walk away to the next big thing and you're left with a lot of great plans or half-started stories that either slam to a premature stop or there's no one left to put them back in motion. Starting a story with friends who have a common goal is great if your circle of friends can accommodate it. But even if they do expect cries of "cliques" and such from the disenchanted who feel shut out regardless whether they are or not.

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I used to be all strict with the roleplay etiquette and making sure players (me included) could write well, never jumped post order and never violated the metagame, powergame and godmode rules (which can get a little murky at times and unintentional slips happen)... but then I discovered I was killing my own fun by scrutinising every interaction. As long as someone is not being an absolute jerk, it's way less stressful to just roll with it and see where the story takes you. Mutual consideration and sense of fun are more important than rules after all. I've met a few people over the years who are easygoing as well, and are a delight to play with. Oh well, different strokes for different folks!

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14 hours ago, Akane Nacht said:

As long as someone is not being an absolute jerk, it's way less stressful to just roll with it and see where the story takes you.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

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