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A list of last names and their IDs? (A quest for data hoarding, and database optimization)


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Eyy, anyone know where I can complete my list of last names and their IDs? The IDs used to be obtainable via RegAPI and the old login service, but ever since the deprecation of last names, it's no longer possible to get a list of them. LL also deleted the PHP scripts used to populate a list on registration so I can't access those either.

Old cached last name ID databases would be great if anyone has them from their old regapi applications. Also if anyone has the ID for the last name of "Resident", that'd be great addition as well as it'd tell me the total of last names that exist. I assume Linden is ID #1, but not entirely sure so I'm not adding that in, I want it to be 100% accurate.

Why I need/want these:
I hoard data, simple as that. I like to collect as much data as possible and store it because why not.
Also I want to optimize my database, in a similar way that LL stores their database values.

What I mean with how LL stores their database:
Instead of:

(varchar(255) firstname, varchar(255) lastname)

Names are stored as:

(varchar(255) firstname, unsigned smallint lastname)

So for example, the database would store me as ("Chaser", 8195), not ("Chaser", "Zaks"). This is a way more rational way of storing stuff as it doesn't use nearly as much bytes(2 bytes compared to 1 + 4 bytes, not to mention last names contain more than 4 characters).

 

List of the ones I managed to index so far(by scraping old login pages on web.archive.org): http://felix.softhyena.com/list.py

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Here are the minutes of a Beta Server meeting where we started playing with the database. "Resident" isn't actually the highest-numbered name; there was at least one batch later. I joined SL literally days before the end of last names; "Tennyson" is 10910.

http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/Beta_Server_Office_Hours/Minutes/2012-03-08

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My assumptions about name storage was correct! This office hour segment actually contains quite a bit of interesting information too, so thank you so much for it!

Maybe I can get one of the Lindens to dump the last name database for me? Of course I'd have to let them know the information would be public in the end. But reading the logs, I am not quite sure if Oscar means 2 is a secret or is "Secret".

Otherwise, I was able to add 6 new names to the list, so again, thanks! :D

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Chaser Zaks wrote:

Maybe I can get one of the Lindens to dump the name database for me? Of course I'd have to let them know the information would be public in the end.

You probably mean a dump of the lastnames database?

A dump of the names database would make it trivial to see who had been banned. That would be an invasion of privacy.

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I doubt that LL will cooperate with you.  Just wanting to hoard data is not a good enough reason you need this and for LL to take the time to do this. 

Griff gave you a link to a website that has the information if you ever want to look something up.  That should be good enough IMO unless you are up to something you don't want to admit.

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Why is it that everyone thinks last names and their IDs are some sort of highly vulnerable exploitable thing? All it is is a numeric identification for the lastnames, it's no different than bedd047e-a3d7-23e6-57bc-1ef367d848e7 pointing to the default bunny avatar or a UUID for a name.

As stated before, it was publically viewable to anyone who had regapi access, or during the signup process when lastnames were a thing.

And I do want it for other purposes than data hoarding, which is database optimization. I'd rather refer to linked accounts in my database as varchar and unsigned small int, rather than two varchars.

With random integers as a example(1+random(2,31)+1+random(2,31)), with storing each entry with firstname and lastname as varchar, about 35,094 bytes get used for 1,000 rows. With (1+random(2,31)+2), a total of 19,747 bytes are used. Not to mention the micro speed increase.

Also, as seen in the link Theresa linked(The office hour), one of the Lindens was actually listing some of the lastnames and their IDs. If it was such a security risk, he wouldn't have done that.

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