Jump to content
15peter20

Can I really be reported for this?

Recommended Posts


Madelaine McMasters wrote:


Kelli May wrote:

*Sophie also did a lot of the early design of a little thing called the ARM processor. There's probably one lurking close to you right now.

I know the ARM well. I've been designing it into things since college, when it was callled the Acorn RISC Machine. It's got a lovely instruction set, almost as pretty as the PDP-11.

Another woman who had a profound effect on my approach to design is 
. She edited "The Art of Human Interface Design" and "Computers as Theatre", which reinforced and refined my feelings about what makes computers helpful and a pleasure to use.

My tease about COBOL was just that. Mom learned it while Dad was learning FORTRAN, just to be different. And different they were, Mom and Dad, COBOL and FORTRAN. Because I love poking bits and toggling pins, C is my go-to language, in which I've never even once used... goto.

I would bet a nickel that you (probably one of two on this forum) know how to 'work' a slipstick aka slide rule?  Once again, go figure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Madelaine McMasters wrote:

I got a bad grade in "Compiler Design" in grad school because I cheated.

...<snip>...

I'm willing to break the rules to get where I want to go. My success might come (as might yours) from wanting to go to the right places.

That's cheating in the very best "Kirk Tradition" .. at least in my book. Tests aren't just to prove you can write down the right answer, they are supposed to prove you understood the material and can manipulate it into more than the ink or pixels devoted to the facts.

In fact that's one of my tests for Intelligence. When I see someone stepping beyond the a,b,c..x,y,z and creating zebra,rainbow and cantankerous, that's when I know they've made the leap from rote fact into understanding.

IMO far too many students are taught that they only need to memorize facts and sequences and never told that their real goal is to go beyond that point.

Leaps of genius occur when someone takes two or more unrelated concepts then slams them together to create something never before conceived. And they sure didn't get there by coloring within the lines of "book learning".

The chef that throws ingredients in a bowl that no one had ever thought to mix before .. and creates a delicacy. The artist that glues three buttons and a hunk of yarn to a piece of wood and creates a beautiful nymph. The accountant that sees how numbers coming from three reports can be recombined to yield new insight. The writer that puts words and their meaning into new light and turns ink into tears. The mechanic that welds two pipes and some blades onto a cylinder and creates a new form of engine. Those are the geniuses that get it.

FWIW: I see genius in lots of people .. LOTS of people. But I also see a concrete shell poured all over them that makes them believe they are stupid because they can't add fractions or remember which elements make water. That's one of the reasons I find STEM programs so .. stilting. They try only to measure people against their ability to do rote calculations or remember banal facts. None of the STEM programs I've encountered (so far) try to teach students the essence of the Science or the Math or the Engineering (and especially not the Art or Music) that are so important to making something better.

STEM is a good start IMO. But it's like giving everyone a pair of Loafers .. but never explaining why Penny Loafers are so much better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Darrius Gothly wrote:

You've never come across as an ESL'er though. Rather I see your mistakes
a
s those of someone rushing to post,
emotionally
over-charged .. and so
defensive
offensive....
 

 

FIFY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 


DejaHo wrote:


Madelaine McMasters wrote:


Kelli May wrote:

*Sophie also did a lot of the early design of a little thing called the ARM processor. There's probably one lurking close to you right now.

I know the ARM well. I've been designing it into things since college, when it was callled the Acorn RISC Machine. It's got a lovely instruction set, almost as pretty as the PDP-11.

Another woman who had a profound effect on my approach to design is 
. She edited "The Art of Human Interface Design" and "Computers as Theatre", which reinforced and refined my feelings about what makes computers helpful and a pleasure to use.

My tease about COBOL was just that. Mom learned it while Dad was learning FORTRAN, just to be different. And different they were, Mom and Dad, COBOL and FORTRAN. Because I love poking bits and toggling pins, C is my go-to language, in which I've never even once used... goto.

I would bet a nickel that you (probably one of two on this forum) know how to 'work' a slipstick aka slide rule?  Once again, go figure.

Well, I never used one for simple addition.  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


DejaHo wrote:

I would bet a nickel that you (probably one of two on this forum) know how to 'work' a slipstick aka slide rule?  Once again, go figure.


Yep, I still have Dad's Post slide rule around here somewhere. I also had to learn the "whiz wheel" to get my pilot's license.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Madelaine McMasters wrote:


DejaHo wrote:

I would bet a nickel that you (probably one of two on this forum) know how to 'work' a slipstick aka slide rule?  Once again, go figure.


Yep, I still have Dad's Post slide rule around here somewhere. I also had to learn the "
" to get my pilot's license.

And yet the majority of modern science can't seem to believe the Antikythera Mechanism is an early ancestor? Go figure that one too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Perrie Juran wrote:

 

DejaHo wrote:


Madelaine McMasters wrote:


Kelli May wrote:

*Sophie also did a lot of the early design of a little thing called the ARM processor. There's probably one lurking close to you right now.

I know the ARM well. I've been designing it into things since college, when it was callled the Acorn RISC Machine. It's got a lovely instruction set, almost as pretty as the PDP-11.

Another woman who had a profound effect on my approach to design is 
. She edited "The Art of Human Interface Design" and "Computers as Theatre", which reinforced and refined my feelings about what makes computers helpful and a pleasure to use.

My tease about COBOL was just that. Mom learned it while Dad was learning FORTRAN, just to be different. And different they were, Mom and Dad, COBOL and FORTRAN. Because I love poking bits and toggling pins, C is my go-to language, in which I've never even once used... goto.

I would bet a nickel that you (probably one of two on this forum) know how to 'work' a slipstick aka slide rule?  Once again, go figure.

Well, I never used one for simple addition. 
;)

Several engineering students are taking a final. One of them is cheating and brought a slide rule to the exam.

“Hey,” the student next to him whispers. “Can you help me? What’s 3 × 6?”

The cheater reaches for his slide rule, and after a few seconds he replies, “19.”

“Are you sure?” asks the other.

The cheater again reaches for his slide rule, and after another few seconds he replies, “You’re right. It’s closer to 18… 18.3, to be precise.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


DejaHo wrote:

Several engineering students are taking a final. One of them is cheating and brought a slide rule to the exam.

“Hey,” the student next to him whispers. “Can you help me? What’s 3 × 6?”

The cheater reaches for his slide rule, and after a few seconds he replies, “19.”

“Are you sure?” asks the other.

The cheater again reaches for his slide rule, and after another few seconds he replies, “You’re right. It’s closer to 18… 18.3, to be precise.”

And thus was born Apollo XIII ...

.. or was it Hubble?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Darrius Gothly wrote:


Madelaine McMasters wrote:


DejaHo wrote:

I would bet a nickel that you (probably one of two on this forum) know how to 'work' a slipstick aka slide rule?  Once again, go figure.


Yep, I still have Dad's Post slide rule around here somewhere. I also had to learn the "
" to get my pilot's license.

And yet the majority of modern science can't seem to believe the
is an early ancestor? Go figure that one too!

I was just looking at that mechanism an hour or so ago, after reading a comment to a news story somewhere, penned by someone named... antikythera. I love the spooky feeling I get from pure coincidence.

The question things like this raise for me is... How many breakthroughs end up forgotten? How many geniuses go unrecognized? And all of this because the person or the idea wasn't in the right place as the right time. I believe humans are far more capable than most believe, and that we don't see it because of lack of opportunity. I doubt Einstein was the smartest man alive during even one second of his life. He was the product of his intelligence, his opportunities and random chance.

We forget that the brilliant are always among us, lacking the opportunity to shine. And so some come think the Antikythera must have been left by aliens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


steph Arnott wrote:

No one under thirty uses this "FIFY
" it like putting a sign up that says "i am 50 plus years old"

And?  Thanks for the information but so what?  

You seem to think 30 is the epitome of intellectual development and fashion sense. 

 

PS Ask anyone over thirty if they would like to be thirty again. They won't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you like to be 14 again?

Back when you thought being 30 would be the ultimate in boring and stodgy?

Didnt think so.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Back when you thought being 30 would be the ultimate in boring and stodgy?" no, am 30 and when i was 10 never thought that, must be just you that thought that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


steph Arnott wrote:

"Back when you thought being 30 would be the ultimate in boring and stodgy?" no, am 30 and when i was 10 never thought that, must be just you that thought that way.

 

Whether you never thought at 10 that 30 would be boring and stodgy, you clearly think at 30 that 50 will be boring and stodgy. 

 

But the question is, would you want to be 14 again?  Or do you prefer being the age you are? And if so, do you imagine only 30 year olds prefer being the age they are?

My point is you keep making comments that make it clear that being older than you now are is a bad thing, something those who are should be ashamed of. After all, they DO write "FIFY" (and btw, only ppl your age still write "LOL" -- young people don't).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"would you want to be 14 again?" no, why would i want to go thru pubity again? Maybe OK for you boys, is a nightmare for us girls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


steph Arnott wrote:

"would you want to be 14 again?" no, why would i want to go thru pubity again? Maybe OK for you boys, is a nightmare for us girls.

Exactly. And in the same way most people who have been 30, dont want to be 30 again, and do not consider you morally, intellectually or in any other way superior because you are. 

So what is your point in telling people that writing FIFY means they are OLD -- like that is a bad, shameful thing they need to keep secret (and not something you would ever stoop to being).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Then stop acting superior when some of you clearlty are not. In my culture, those older behave like adults with wisdom to offer and not like adolecent children going on about. "oh , you need spell checker, gigggle, hehe"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


steph Arnott wrote:

In my culture, those older behave like adults with wisdom to offer and not like adolecent children going on about. "oh , you need spell checker, gigggle, hehe"



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


steph Arnott wrote:

No one
under
over thirty uses this "FIFY
" it like putting a sign up that says "i am 50 plus years old"

My tailor told me I was a 48R.  

I pay him more than I pay my therapist.

And I still don't know his name.

So I call him Mr. Sew and Sew.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...