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FPS (Frames Per Second)


MrNotepad
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When your game Runs smooth with little to no lag.. I get around 70-80 fps depending on whats going on an empty sim i get around 80 maybe push around 85 on High and than on a moderate filled Sim i get around 70 or when Im Rping i get around 70 fps.. so it depends on your system,Graphics card and whats going on around you

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for the old celluloid movies a frame reate of 27 was enough to let movements go smoothly, a fps in the viewer around that is already quite ok,, a bit less isn't too bad either, but under 15 is bad :) Most people won't even notice difference between 27 and 50 or more... our eyes/brains are to slow to notice it.

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Your experience is typical. In deserted and emplty regions FPS is high. The more avatars that are around the slower a viewer performs.

This degrading of performance because of avatars is a combination of causes. The more avatars the more updates that have to be sent to update your viewer on what they are doing. Those are subject to network and server-computer issues.

But, another factor is the high poly-count mesh clothes that are being sold and worn. A viewer setting will allow you to change what your viewer renders. See: http://blog.nalates.net/2014/11/17/second-life-performance-render-muting/

At <10 FPS things start to get bumpy.

A more important measure of performance is PING, the time it takes for a keystroke to make to the servers and for you to see a response. 

The viewer's PING is not the same as a network ping you can run from your computers command line. The viewer factors in viewer response time, network travel time, and server response time. An overloaded region server will drive ping up. If you simultaneoudly run a system/network ping you will get very different timings.

Ideal PING is <100ms. You probably won't notice lag until PING goes over 250ms. At times >500ms you'll notice the keyboard and mouse being sluggish. SL and your viewer will generally function (not well) up to 2,000 to 4,000ms. Consistant high times will cause the SL servers to drop your connection.

If PING is being driven up by server lag/overload you'll notice slow response and rubberbanding (when the avatar walks forward and snaps back to an earlier position) even if you have a good system/network ping.

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Alwin Alcott wrote:

for the old celluloid movies a frame reate of 27 was enough to let movements go smoothly, a fps in the viewer around that is already quite ok,, a bit less isn't too bad either, but under 15 is bad
:)
Most people won't even notice difference between 27 and 50 or more... our eyes/brains are to slow to notice it.

24fps actually. BUT that is film not a video game. You will notice a slow fps in a video game when you watch things move across the screen, or when you turn the camera.

Stand in a spot and turn 360 dregrees with 24fps and you notice far more jerking than if you spin at 60fps or 80fps.

Films rarly (if ever did that). Films though do show tearing when you see a car speed past.

Sort of like this:

image.png

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Anything over 20 is fairly decent and over 30 is full video quality. The absolute max framerate that the SL servers will send is 45. There is literally no difference in the view of somebody getting 45 FPS and somebody getting 95FPS in SL. If you are seeing anything above that it means your video card is just duplicating frames waiting for data for a new one and you can safely turn up some settings. 

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Crim Mip wrote:

Anything over 20 is fairly decent and over 30 is full video quality. The absolute max framerate that the SL servers will send is 45. There is literally no difference in the view of somebody getting 45 FPS and somebody getting 95FPS in SL.
If you are seeing anything above that it means your video card is just duplicating frames
waiting for data for a new one and you can safely turn up some settings. 

Or it means that the viewer interpolates between frames

This is very plausible since most rendering is made by the viewer

:smileysurprised::):smileyvery-happy:

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Crim Mip wrote:

The absolute max framerate that the SL servers will send is 45. There is literally no difference in the view of somebody getting 45 FPS and somebody getting 95FPS in SL. If you are seeing anything above that it means your video card is just duplicating frames waiting for data for a new one and you can safely turn up some settings. 

Please do not get server "frame rate" of 22.1ms and your video cards redraw rate mixed up. They are two completely seperate things.

As long as the object is not physically moving (in this case llObjectRot and other viewer side effects don't count)

As long as you are not talking about avatars walking/flying (in this case dancing and other animations don't count)

then the vast majority of SL content you recieve once when it rezzes and it stays there with updates happening only over a 2 to 3 second period. You can verify this in the advanced menu - turn on the update beacons and octrees to see.

That prim you just rezzed ain't goin' anywhere - so the server doesn't need to tell you it's (and all 15,000 other objects) position 45 times a second. Once every 2 to 3 seconds is fine, and saves a lot of internet quota too.

 

With the objects your video card knows of, it can draw it as fast as it likes, because at that point it's viewer side. As I mentioned before, when you spin/turn then a faster FPS is a huge benefit.

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I am on a Mac Pro

Firestorm 4.4 (2 years old viewer) & 4.6 (latest viewer):

When staring on a static scenery: 10 to 13 FPS

When meeting some other people about 2 FPS or below

With the latest viewers I just cant chat, as any key pressed freezes keys and mouse of the computer for 0.5 to 4 seconds.

(see also: http://community.secondlife.com/t5/Second-Life-Viewer/Does-LL-have-any-intention-of-fixing-the-COCOA-bug-that-affects/m-p/2896878#M25431 )

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  • 4 weeks later...

30 is about the lowest most people see as fluid motion. If you're just hanging out and conversing, as low as 10 or 15 is usable. Your framerates will naturally be lower in areas with more items and people in it (especially if said objects were designed by Hellen Keller, ignoring all best practices in regards to client side lag). I'd shoot for at least 20 in a busy area.

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  • 1 month later...

Microsoft link is pointless, it refers to motion video. SL is not that, the viewer draws on the fly from data sent, which is mostly from the physics engine from LLs servers which is therefore the defining speed limit. It's not a TV either that morphs between frames.

Hardly anything in SL moves that fast that the average human could detect, as very few can see any better than 30fps, although certain epileptics can have problems with 50-60fps.

Mostly the speed is determined by system capability, network connections to and from LL servers, graphics, and the amount of avs and how badly their mesh is made, and applying that to the physics positions, collisions and interactions, which can also be delayed or lagged by scripts which add another layer for the physics engine to calculate.

http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/Physics_engine

http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/Physics_Optimization

http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/Making_Mesh_Physics

Transparency, via alphas, also adds a heavy recalculation load, as it does with window drawing in operating systems.

The end point is the fps is essentially the refresh rate: if there's nothing to refresh ie no new data received, it matters not an iota what your fps is. A photo is still a photo at 1fps or 800fps. Thus the real speed is how much data you are receiving, which is mostly positioning and interaction data from the physics engine, once textures and data has downloaded from the asset servers.

This is a common thing people have with both computer monitors and TV. Your monitor only changes if there is something different to display. TV transmissions are limited to the transmission standards, because that is what is sent. All your 800Hz TV does is take your 50-60Hz broadcast images and morph between them with inbuilt graphics chips, giving the false impression when it comes to things like sports slow motion. The ball was never in that place from the original data, it's just the determination of the morphing graphics.

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You are so right, in movies and on TV there are nothing but stills
In the virtual world there is nothing but stills and on the SL servers we have 45 per second at the most

The virtual motion we see is generated by the viewer though and is not limited to the capacity of server and connection
It is client side, the number is not fixed and can go higher than 100 FPS

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