Jump to content

Where are all my friends? Come on in and lets get comfy by the fire!


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 15.1k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Hippie Bowman

    5413

  • valerie Inshan

    1822

  • Madelaine McMasters

    1755

  • DQ Darwin

    738

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Rhonda's thoughtful thought of the day: If you love someone, set them free.  You will know your love is true if they don't press charges.

Happy Wednesday folks! Four years ago today I brought this little guy home and snapped this pic. More current ones with his brother.

It’s final, they are mine! 

Posted Images

24 minutes ago, Jameson2001 said:

image.png.e67da62b524b29c93bc20c8044a16834.png  Happy Monday!  Thank goodness there is only 86,400 seconds in a Monday:D

To help wake up your brain a little brain teaser with the answer tomorrow:

What kind of room has no windows or doors? 

Oh that easy! A mushroom!

 

Peace!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Jameson2001 said:

Next time I am bringing in Calculus to the brain teaser

One upon a time, many years ago ... I made an A in all 3 semesters of Calculus (plus another semester of Dif-E)
All I remember are very few high level concepts that were supposed to mean something but there is no way in hello-kitty I can different an equation any more.

 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Rhonda Huntress said:

Good morning (it's after noon but I have not been up long).

It is another fine Caturday for the unemployed.  ;)

 

it´s hug your cat day, too...^^

I FINALLY managed to empty my shopping folders - everything´s unpacked, catalogized and put away nicely... now to get dressed and maybe continue with the new house...or just ... idk hang out xD  it´s been a weird day

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

integral x/(x^2 + 4 x + 6) dx = 1/2 (log(x^2 + 4 x + 6) - 2 sqrt(2) tan^(-1)((x + 2)/sqrt(2))) + constant

Please don't do that! Same to you, Jameson. Gotta draw the line somewhere and I say calculus is across the line.

Line. Lines. I can work with those. Geometry Yes, Calculus No!

ps: My father once got a passing grade in one of his calculus classes by accident. He copied one of the problems for the final wrong, and wound up getting trapped trying to fight his way through it (while filling a couple sheets of paper). When time was called he'd taken so much time on that one problem that he hadn't finished the final, but he turned in what he had. The instructor noticed the incorrect copy, but read through my dad's 'solution' anyway. He said, "It's the wrong problem, but you did prove that the distance between a line and a point on that line is zero. If you know enough calculus to do this you pass the test."

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dillon Levenque said:

ps: My father once got a passing grade in one of his calculus classes by accident.

Your Dad's calculus problem reminds me of my hardest course in engineering school, "Electromagnetic Fields and Waves". It was my last semester before graduation and I got burned by a trick question on the final exam. Had I read the problem carefully and done some quick checks, I'd have discovered that the "point" at which I was to compute the electromagnetic field gradient was inside the metal sphere that was next to the wire (equivalent to your Dad's line). And so the field gradient would be zero, as all points on a conductive object are at the same potential.

But I didn't read the problem carefully, I went ahead and tried to brute force my way through calculating how a metal sphere would warp the electrical field emanating from a wire. As my time ran out, I scratched a big "X" across my work and wrote "0" at the end. Had I taken the time to erase that work (I always work in pencil, as it's a woman's prerogative to change her mind, yes?) I'd have got the problem right. The gradient was zero. But no, I had to leave it all there for the professor to see. And so, rather than my zero being the correct answer to the problem, it represented the credit I got for it. As a result, my grade for the course was C, not B. The only C of my engineering school career, dammit.

Like Rhonda, I can't actually compute the integral James presented, but I do know how to jump over to Wolfram-Alpha for a helping hand. And I suspect the "high level concepts" that Rhonda remembers from her calculus and diffy-Q classes have helped her understand a little bit more about how the world works and I hope she's enjoyed the insight. I have.

Edited by Madelaine McMasters
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Madelaine McMasters said:

Like Rhonda, I can't actually compute the integral James presented, but I do know how to jump over to Wolfram-Alpha for a helping hand. And I suspect the "high level concepts" that Rhonda remembers from her calculus and diffy-Q classes have helped her understand a little bit more about how the world works and I hope she's enjoyed the insight. I have.

As a rather unimaginative mathematician myself, I learned a few basic rules along that way through my calc and diffEQ courses:

1. If you can integrate by parts, do it.

2. If you can integrate by substitution, do it.

3. If #1 and #2 don't work, ask a mathematician.

Like most scientific types, I learned the math tricks of my own discipline, honed them to perfection, and. left the rest for people who chase quarks and angels dancing on pinheads.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...