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Kelli May wrote:


 Ginger cats are far more often male than female.


Try telling that to all the Gingers in this Forum! 

You are living dangerously.  ;)

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Kelli May wrote:


 

There are other clues. Ginger cats are far more often male than female. Calico and tortoiseshell cats are almost always female. This is down to the way red coloration is expressed on the X-chromosome. 

 

I didn't know that, but our small sample size lines up. We've had two gingers, both male, and one tortie female (who stole the hearts of every male in the house, feline or otherwise, and who will always be missed).

You were dead-on with the 'faking it' comment, too. :-)

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Dillon Levenque wrote:


Kelli May wrote:


 

There are other clues. Ginger cats are far more often male than female. Calico and tortoiseshell cats are almost always female. This is down to the way red coloration is expressed on the X-chromosome. 

 

I didn't know that, but our small sample size lines up. We've had two gingers, both male, and one tortie female (who stole the hearts of every male in the house, feline or otherwise, and who will always be missed).

You were dead-on with the 'faking it' comment, too. :-)

Your sample bears out the genetics. It's genetically impossible to have a tortie male cat unless it's XXY which is both very rare and sterile. Female gingers need the gene on both X & Y which can only happen 1 chance in 4 when both parents posses it. 

</sad cat lady>

eta: I 'owned' a tortie queen who was charming, beautiful and petite but as vicious as a mile of rusty razor-wire. Fuss her anywhere above the neck and she would melt. Touch her anywhere else and she'd fasten onto your hand like the world's cutest little bear-trap. She hunted like Bear Grylls on a starvation diet, dragging whole, live, adult rabbits (which outweighed her 2:1 or better) though the catflap to release them squealing and maimed on my living room carpet. Baby rabbits she'd eat on the doorstep outside. And she'd eat everything: skull, eyes, teeth, feet, fur. Everything but the lower intestine. She was a beautiful holocaust of anything that went 'squeak' in the night. 

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Perrie Juran wrote:


I tried to get my big toe to my eye, but I smashed my specs with my combat boot. Does this count?

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Kittens 01.jpgKittens 02.jpgKittens 03.jpgKittens 06.jpg

 

Triplets...was a litter of only three.

And now I need to get a hold of my friend because I think both these torties were male.

They were around 6 months old if I recall when I took these.

 

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If they are male, then as far as I understand cat coat genetics, they're either XXY or chimeric . A tortie coat requires the red-tone allele dominant on one X, recessive on the other. Without two X chromosomes, they can only express either red-dominant (ginger) or red-recessive (non-ginger).

The other option is a chimera: an individual merged from two embryos, one male, one female. Ironically this is more likely in cats than XXY. When you throw in the small litter size it seems even more likely. The three cats were, in fact, five cats :)

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Kelli May wrote:

If they are male, then as far as I understand cat coat genetics, they're either XXY or chimeric . A tortie coat requires the red-tone allele dominant on one X, recessive on the other. Without two X chromosomes, they can only express either red-dominant (ginger) or red-recessive (non-ginger).

The other option is a chimera: an individual merged from two embryos, one male, one female. Ironically this is more likely in cats than XXY. When you throw in the small litter size it seems even more likely. The three cats were, in fact, five cats
:)

Wild.

All three are manxes but have shown no health problems.

The Mom was very young, only around six months at the time....an indoor cat that got out one night.  (She had never tried to get out nor did she ever try again).

We've noticed an increase in 'stray' manxes in her neighborhood since that time.  A manx Tom must have moved into the neighborhood.

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Kelli May wrote:


RobertThorp wrote:

Very true. It is harder to fake gender in RL, but I have known of it being done. I know of one guy (NOT ME!) who met a good looking girl in a bar. One thing let to another, and eventually he found out that she was really a he.

So take everything, particularly SL but also RL with a grain of salt.

No one who passes that well in RL is "faking it".

It depends upon how much the person being deceived had to drink.:matte-motes-big-grin:

Marybeth

WORDPRESS

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