Jump to content
  • 0
WanderleiMMA

Help Can't enable physics for object with physics resource cost greater than 32

Question

  • 1

It means what it says.   You can't have a physics-enabled object with a physics cost of more than 32.   This used to mean 32 prims, but now it's a more complicated calculation. 

Under normal circumstances, you would cut down on the physics cost first by making sure all components of the build are set to convex hull rather than prim (use the features tab of the editor and edit linked parts).   If that doesn't work I'd advise setting some child prims to physics type none, which takes them out of the physics accounting altogether, though at the cost of, in effect, making them phantom.

However, in this specific case, I cannot for the life of me see why a sliding door needs to be set to physics enabled.   Physics enabled means not that the object is solid (not phantom) but that SL's equivalents of the laws of physics apply to it -- it's affected by gravity and the laws of mechanics.   Vehicles need to be physics enabled, but doors certainly don't.

ETA   Thanks for posting the link to the script.   I understand now why the door is physical (though I think the solution might well cause more problems than it solves).   In any case, that script is now outdated, in that you can acheive a similar result more efficiently with llSetKeyframedMotion .   If you're interested in learning how to write scripts, ask in the Scripting Forum, and you'll find plenty of people ready to help.

As to your apparently very primmy door, is it linked to the rest of the building?   If it is, your llMoveToTarget script won't work -- that assumes the door is not linked.   It would need to be unlinked for llSetKeyframedMotion to work too.  If you want it linked, then you need to use llSetPos (or llSetLinkPrimitiveParamsFast).   

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 1

It means what it says.   You can't have a physics-enabled object with a physics cost of more than 32.   This used to mean 32 prims, but now it's a more complicated calculation. 

Under normal circumstances, you would cut down on the physics cost first by making sure all components of the build are set to convex hull rather than prim (use the features tab of the editor and edit linked parts).   If that doesn't work I'd advise setting some child prims to physics type none, which takes them out of the physics accounting altogether, though at the cost of, in effect, making them phantom.

However, in this specific case, I cannot for the life of me see why a sliding door needs to be set to physics enabled.   Physics enabled means not that the object is solid (not phantom) but that SL's equivalents of the laws of physics apply to it -- it's affected by gravity and the laws of mechanics.   Vehicles need to be physics enabled, but doors certainly don't.

ETA   Thanks for posting the link to the script.   I understand now why the door is physical (though I think the solution might well cause more problems than it solves).   In any case, that script is now outdated, in that you can acheive a similar result more efficiently with llSetKeyframedMotion .   If you're interested in learning how to write scripts, ask in the Scripting Forum, and you'll find plenty of people ready to help.

As to your apparently very primmy door, is it linked to the rest of the building?   If it is, your llMoveToTarget script won't work -- that assumes the door is not linked.   It would need to be unlinked for llSetKeyframedMotion to work too.  If you want it linked, then you need to use llSetPos (or llSetLinkPrimitiveParamsFast).   

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Two things:

1.  A door should never have to be more than two prims.  Even a "highly detailed" door with moldings and inset panels and knobs and such should be do-able in 7 prims or less.  Most people manage to create nice looking doors with only ONE prim.

2.  As Innula says, there's no need to make a door physical to get it to slide.  That's a vewwy vewwy strange script you've got there. 

There are LOTS of door scripts out there, but here is a very simple one I found with a brief Google search:

http://www.free-lsl-scripts.com/cgi/freescripts.plx?ID=82

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

That's a fairly simple door script.  A nice one too.  There's absolutely no reason why you would ever want to make the door physical.  It would serve no purpose and could cause all sorts of problems. Whether it's physical or not, though, you will have a bear of a time working with a door that has that many prims in it.  I suggest greatly simplifying your work, either by making the entire door out of mesh -- you could easily get it down to an L.I. of less than 3 -- or by making use of textures rather than separate prims.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 09.05.2014 at 4:22 AM, Innula Zenovka said:

It means what it says.   You can't have a physics-enabled object with a physics cost of more than 32.   

Hello, thank you so much for this post! It helped me a lot! I was just looking the way to reduce physics cost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Some impressive doors are made using materials. A single prim door can use a diffuse texture, specular and normal maps to replicate what used to require multiple prims.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...