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Marketing Second Life: We Can Do Better


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Exactly, a good builder can work wonders with few textures etc and like I said if the first intall of the viewer was specific to the avatar that was chosen and so also the welome area / sim its cache already populated as far as it can be!

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Phoebe Avro wrote:

Exactly, a good builder can work wonders with few textures etc and like I said if the first intall of the viewer was specific to the avatar that was chosen and so also the welome area / sim its cache already populated as far as it can be!

Would it perhaps be worthwhile for LL to look to particularly accomplished resident creators to design these themed areas?

And of course each area could become part of a broader marketing campaign, reaching out to a diverse base of potential users.

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i think peeple shoud have to complete tests to get access to different parts of second life

liek they should have to pass a speling test to get to the oxbridge university place

and peotry tests to get to go to loveydovey places

and flying tests to go to fishing places

and jesticlation tests to go to discos

and building tests to go to places where you can build

and if you fail the tests you can go to places were kid avatars live

 

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MizzFuzzyMoran wrote:

i think peeple shoud have to complete tests to get access to different parts of second life

liek they should have to pass a speling test to get to the oxbridge university place

and peotry tests to get to go to loveydovey places

and flying tests to go to fishing places

and jesticlation tests to go to discos

and building tests to go to places where you can build

and if you fail the tests you can go to places were kid avatars live

 

What would be the test for posting on the forums? Being able to recognize manifestations of a serial troll?

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LaskyaClaren wrote:


Phoebe Avro wrote:

Exactly, a good builder can work wonders with few textures etc and like I said if the first intall of the viewer was specific to the avatar that was chosen and so also the welome area / sim its cache already populated as far as it can be!

Would it perhaps be worthwhile for LL to look to particularly accomplished resident creators to design these themed areas?

And of course each area could become part of a broader marketing campaign, reaching out to a diverse base of potential users.

Actually they do that already - all the "Moles" who do the Linden Department of Public Works projects are residents with reputations as builders already and who work under contract to Linden Lab. The "Mole" names are pseudonyms so they remain anonymous.

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slad.jpg

 


LaskyaClaren wrote:

<snip>

Personally, when i come into SL, I want to 
go
places and 
see
things.

</snip>

 


I'm tagging your post because of this statement.

At one time the emphasis was "Your World, Your Imagination."

A while back I started a thread, "Second Life: First Expectations."  When I started I wanted to see the SL World.  And I do still enjoy exploring it all. 

I think the above is a good example artistically of what can be done to promote the creative side of SL.

As to the OP's post and title, I'd ask if what you really mean is what can we do different?  Different so as to target a different type of person with interests other than just socializing.  Because socializing is still the primary reason I believe people join SL.  It certainly was a major factor in my signing up.

Maybe my thoughts here appear a little scattered.  That could be because I'm not sure of an answer.  A question you have to answer when you advertise is "Where will I get the most bang for my buck."  And for Second Life that still may very well be targetting its social aspects.

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Theresa Tennyson wrote:


LaskyaClaren wrote:


Phoebe Avro wrote:

Exactly, a good builder can work wonders with few textures etc and like I said if the first intall of the viewer was specific to the avatar that was chosen and so also the welome area / sim its cache already populated as far as it can be!

Would it perhaps be worthwhile for LL to look to particularly accomplished resident creators to design these themed areas?

And of course each area could become part of a broader marketing campaign, reaching out to a diverse base of potential users.

Actually they do that already - all the "Moles" who do the Linden Department of Public Works projects are residents with reputations as builders already and who work under contract to Linden Lab. The "Mole" names are pseudonyms so they remain anonymous.

Interesting! I don't think I knew this.

If they used builders who were particularly renowned for certain kinds of sims -- say a Bryn Oh for an art-themed welcome area, or someone with a great deal experience with Steampunk for one of those -- it might make these seem less "generic," and create a bit of a buzz?

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Perrie Juran wrote:

slad.jpg

 

LaskyaClaren wrote:

<snip>

Personally, when i come into SL, I want to 
go
places and 
see
things.

</snip>

 

 

I'm tagging your post because of this statement.

At one time the emphasis was "Your World, Your Imagination."

A while back I started a thread,
  When I started I wanted to see the SL World.  And I do still enjoy exploring it all. 

I think the above is a good example artistically of what can be done to promote the creative side of SL.

As to the OP's post and title, I'd ask if what you really mean is what can we do different?  Different so as to target a different type of person with interests other than just socializing.  Because socializing is still the primary reason I believe people join SL.  It certainly was a major factor in my signing up.

Maybe my thoughts here appear a little scattered.  That could be because I'm not sure of an answer.  A question you have to answer when you advertise is "Where will I get the most bang for my buck."  And for Second Life that still may very well be targetting its social aspects.

I agree absolutely Perrie. My presence here on the forums speaks in part to the importance of socializing for me.

But people can socialize online in a huge variety of different media -- on FB, on Twitter, on Snapchat, etc.

What LL needs to do, perhaps, is to find something that differentiates the kind of socializing that can be done here from that on other social media platforms.

For instance, I can take a friend to visit Paris here. The socializing may still be paramount, but the quality of that interaction is unlike anything available anywhere else.

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LaskyaClaren wrote:


Theresa Tennyson wrote:


LaskyaClaren wrote:


Phoebe Avro wrote:

Exactly, a good builder can work wonders with few textures etc and like I said if the first intall of the viewer was specific to the avatar that was chosen and so also the welome area / sim its cache already populated as far as it can be!

Would it perhaps be worthwhile for LL to look to particularly accomplished resident creators to design these themed areas?

And of course each area could become part of a broader marketing campaign, reaching out to a diverse base of potential users.

Actually they do that already - all the "Moles" who do the Linden Department of Public Works projects are residents with reputations as builders already and who work under contract to Linden Lab. The "Mole" names are pseudonyms so they remain anonymous.

Interesting! I don't think I knew this.

If they used builders who were particularly renowned for certain kinds of sims -- say a Bryn Oh for an art-themed welcome area, or someone with a great deal experience with Steampunk for one of those -- it might make these seem less "generic," and create a bit of a buzz?

Possible buzz, but guaranteed BAWWWWW. Not the standard BAWWWWW that's constantly flowing under the surface, doing little besides establishing the magnetic poles, but an absolute BAWWWWW volcano. "Why does [so and so] get a region? Why not [such and such]?"

My thinking is that SL is by nature a niche product; not so much in itself but a product FOR niches. SL's structure allows almost anything to be done, but not as well as a dedicated platform would do the same thing for. It's best suited for things that don't have a market big enough for someone to invest in infrastructure to support it in a dedicated way.

Ebbe had an interesting idea when he suggested that SL may eventually be marketed as different things to different groups to the point of giving it more than one brand identity. They could share the same infrastructure but could even be invisible to each other if that's how those groups wanted it.

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I worked in a shop some years ago and one of the reps that used to visit us once told me he used to work for a cosmetics company, The first thing you learn he said is that you are selling a dream and its all in the packaging and advertising!

Now also do you remember that movie the original Total Recall , where Arnie goes to the company to buy a virtual holiday?

Where he was asked if he would not prefer an adventure instead of a boring old holiday, where he could be a secret agent on a mission ?

Well that's SL, you can be anything here you want to be^^  and you can have that adventure!

This is what LL should maybe promoting exactly what SL is ..... A Second Life

 

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I got interested in Second Life via a special on at some point in 2007 called 'Rise of the Video Games'.

It was just a little documentary going through the evolution of gaming and where gaming is expected to go in the future.

 

At the end it pointed out some 'games' that aren't even, well games. It mentioned SL as a 'virtual platform where you can do whatever you like - even fly!' And at the time I was like 'sounds neat LETS TAKE A LOOK SHALL WE' and well here I've been ever since.

 

Mostly, I stayed for the RP. Without the RP available in SL, I don't think I would still be here. I met most of my friends through RP.

 

I met some great people from Norway, England, New York, Chicago - all places I will likely never get to visit, or visit rarely. I have some of these people in my phone, and I text them pictures of my cats, I mean - if that's not super cool, then I don't know what is. I have made friendships here that have been strong and have lasted longer than some of my RL friendships.

 

Exploring character building has been vastly rewording and exploring all SL has to offer within those characters is incredibly entertaining. I just wish all this was easy to fit on an ad. xD

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KlistiesSeMio Ewinaga wrote:

I got interested in Second Life via a special on at some point in 2007 called 'Rise of the Video Games'.

It was just a little documentary going through the evolution of gaming and where gaming is expected to go in the future.

 

At the end it pointed out some 'games' that aren't even, well
games
. It mentioned SL as a 'virtual platform where you can do whatever you like - even fly!' And at the time I was like 'sounds neat LETS TAKE A LOOK SHALL WE' and well here I've been ever since.

 

Mostly, I stayed for the RP. Without the RP available in SL, I don't think I would still be here. I met most of my friends through RP.

 

I met some great people from Norway, England, New York, Chicago - all places I will likely never get to visit, or visit rarely. I have some of these people in my phone, and I text them pictures of my cats, I mean - if that's not super cool, then I don't know what is. I have made friendships here that have been strong and have lasted longer than some of my RL friendships.

 

Exploring character building has been vastly rewording and exploring all SL has to offer within those characters is incredibly entertaining. I just wish all this was easy to fit on an ad.
xD

Great story!

Maybe the way to "fit" RP on an ad is to show, again, the diversity of experience in SL, in part by showing avatars in locations that are self-evidently not merely recreations of a RL nightclub or suburban bungalow.

So . . . show elves in a magical forest! Or vampires in a gothic castle!

One of the problems with the current ad campaign is that it reduces RP to having bigger b00bs and trimmer waists.

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Theresa Tennyson wrote:

Possible buzz, but guaranteed BAWWWWW. Not the standard BAWWWWW that's constantly flowing under the surface, doing little besides establishing the magnetic poles, but an absolute BAWWWWW volcano. "Why does [so and so] get a region? Why not [such and such]?"

My thinking is that SL is by nature a niche product; not so much in itself but a product FOR niches. SL's structure allows almost anything to be done, but not as well as a dedicated platform would do the same thing for. It's best suited for things that don't have a market big enough for someone to invest in infrastructure to support it in a dedicated way.

Ebbe had an interesting idea when he suggested that SL may eventually be marketed as different things to different groups to the point of giving it more than one brand identity. They could share the same infrastructure but could even be invisible to each other if that's how those groups wanted it.

I take your point about the drama that would undoubtedly surround a choice of particular people to build welcome areas. But possibly it could be managed through a transparent competition of some sort? Or maybe just do it in the sly . . .

I like the idea of SL as a home for multiple "niches" a lot; That sort of thinking might, in fact, lead to more diverse, interesting, and targeted advertisements -- if it marketing were permitted to reflect it.

One wonders a bit, as an aside, how much coordination there actually is between "marketing" and the other important areas of LL's operation?

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MizzKittenzz wrote:

Well said, also I recommend all places and jobs in sl shouldn't be just sex and relationships. 


If that is "all" or even a majority of what you find, you are missing out oin a vast, very vast, portion of sl. Sure it's around, and it's pretty easy to find too, but it hardly makes up the majority of sl, if one actually does the legwork to get out there and find the other parts of sl.

I think that's part of the problem for some folks, when they say it's all about "teh sexoors" and whatnot.  They're too lazy to get out there and actually FIND the rest of sl, so they go with what is easy.  I would honestly venture to guess that non-sex and non-relationship related places and jobs make up the largest portion of sl. The problem is, there are soooooo many things that can fall under either header and fit those categories that it can overwhelm folks.  Whereas things related to sex or relationships, has a much more limited number of things that would, or could, fall into that category, so they're super easy to find. Other non-sex related things are easy to find too, if you're willing to look for them. But some folks just aren't.

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Tari Landar wrote:


MizzKittenzz wrote:

Well said, also I recommend all places and jobs in sl shouldn't be just sex and relationships. 


If that is "all" or even a majority of what you find, you are missing out oin a vast, very vast, portion of sl. Sure it's around, and it's pretty easy to find too, but it hardly makes up the majority of sl, if one actually does the legwork to get out there and find the other parts of sl.

I think that's part of the problem for some folks, when they say it's all about "teh sexoors" and whatnot.  They're too lazy to get out there and actually FIND the rest of sl, so they go with what is easy.  I would honestly venture to guess that non-sex and non-relationship related places and jobs make up the largest portion of sl. The problem is, there are soooooo many things that can fall under either header and fit those categories that it can overwhelm folks.  Whereas things related to sex or relationships, has a much more limited number of things that would, or could, fall into that category, so they're super easy to find. Other non-sex related things are easy to find too, if you're willing to look for them. But some folks just aren't.

I'd go further than this.

I don't think, generally, that SL is actually any more oriented towards sex or relationships than most other social media platforms. At one time, from what I understand, the old "Scrabulous" game on FB was one of the top places to cyber. And Snapchat is almost built for sex.

To some degree, I think that if your impression is that SL is all about relationships and sex, it's because you've been looking for them. I myself can go through entire months in-world without being hit on, or running across a sex pose ball.

But maybe that's just because I'm such a shy, retiring flower . . . :-D

ETA. To illustrate what I've said above. I created this account in August, and I've been active with it since about December. And I have not ONCE yet been propositioned or run across a sex pose ball.

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I think this may be the magic bullet.

People think of creativity as building or scripting, etc. -- but the RP is no doubt the most popular form of creativity in SL, even when it is not called or recognized as RP. People take objects that others may have made/scripted, whatever, and incorporate them into various roles and RP environments -- historical settings, sci fi, anime, love nest, family home, fantasy, bordello, etc.

This is SL's market -- a very diverse one, but with this fundamental attraction to RP in common (for most if not all).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pamela Galli wrote:

I think this may be the magic bullet.

People think of creativity as building or scripting, etc. -- but the
RP is no doubt the most popular form of creativity in SL, even when it is not called or recognized as RP
. People take objects that others may have made/scripted, whatever, and incorporate them into various roles and RP environments -- historical settings, sci fi, anime, love nest, family home, fantasy, bordello, etc.

This is SL's market -- a very diverse one, but with this fundamental attraction to RP in common (for most if not all).

 

I agree absolutely. And I don't think it even needs to be marketed as RP. All that needs to be done is to show what is possible.

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Phoebe Avro wrote:

I worked in a shop some years ago and one of the reps that used to visit us once told me he used to work for a cosmetics company, The first thing you learn he said is that you are selling a dream and its all in the packaging and advertising!

Now also do you remember that movie the original Total Recall , where Arnie goes to the company to buy a virtual holiday?

Where he was asked if he would not prefer an adventure instead of a boring old holiday, where he could be a secret agent on a mission ?

Well that's SL, you can be anything here you want to be^^  and you can have that adventure!

This is what LL should maybe promoting exactly what SL is ..... A Second Life

 

When I worked in the music industry as a label rep what they told us we were doing was "selling a prepackaged emotional experience."

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I think just having rotating gifs(as already pointed out) that contain both images of avs as well as "cool" places, is sufficient for those kinds of ads.  If you want to get into more detailed ads, you're going to lose a significant part of your potential audience.  Generally humans have a low attention span.  If it doesn't grab your attention immediately, it isn't likely to do so 3 frames later, either.  Regardless of how long each frame takes. So you need to focus those ads on the things that impress the most.  Whether you like it or not, avs impress people the most from the word go, and places fall second to that.  The level of realism, the ability to connect on some sort of level, whether or not they are interesting to look at.... etc... those things matter.  The images there are actually about what you would expect to see in an ad for sl, the pictures are just of terrible quality. 

I know I also suggested places be in the ads, but I do not think they should be in ads WITH people. Two totally different focal points there.  A gif that has rotating images of various nifty places, done in high quality, with different potential catch phrases describing them in as few words as possible, that can appeal to multiple crowds...those are good ideas. Although both places and avs can and will appeal to people at the same time, they are still two different points. It is entirely possible that one, or the other, won't appeal to some folks as much.  Mixing the two in an ad is nice if the place the ad is embedded into is a place that the folks who would find activities we can do in sl appealing are drawn to.  In other words, the ad needs to be "in place" as it were. If it's an out of place ad, the likelyhood of it getting more than a "hmm, I'll have to check that out later:" isn't very high at all. If it's placed somewhere at least semi-related-it will likely get more than a casual glance with a promise to remember later, and then later never arriving.

Really you could do ads like that to fit every potential crowd out there. But I believe the first focus should be on avs, because it's the very first thing people connect with at all in sl. Until they get their bearings, places don't matter all that much. Sure they have appeal and someone may be intrigued by the ad, but the av is honestly the very first thing they're going to notice.  So an ad that depicts the avs in the best way possible, is a good start.

 

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Perrie Juran wrote:


Phoebe Avro wrote:

I worked in a shop some years ago and one of the reps that used to visit us once told me he used to work for a cosmetics company, The first thing you learn he said is that you are selling a dream and its all in the packaging and advertising!

Now also do you remember that movie the original Total Recall , where Arnie goes to the company to buy a virtual holiday?

Where he was asked if he would not prefer an adventure instead of a boring old holiday, where he could be a secret agent on a mission ?

Well that's SL, you can be anything here you want to be^^  and you can have that adventure!

This is what LL should maybe promoting exactly what SL is ..... A Second Life

 

When I worked in the music industry as a label rep what they told us we were doing was "selling a prepackaged emotional experience."

Interesting. Part of me is gagging quietly, but interesting . . .

I guess the point is that there is nothing "prepackaged" about SL. It's wide open. And that, obviously, is a good thing, and a selling point.

 

ETA. How someone of my particular ideological leanings managed to find herself creating a thread about more effective marketing is actually a bit beyond me. Maybe I'm a little ill . . . ? ;-)

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LaskyaClaren wrote:


Pamela Galli wrote:

I think this may be the magic bullet.

People think of creativity as building or scripting, etc. -- but the
RP is no doubt the most popular form of creativity in SL, even when it is not called or recognized as RP
. People take objects that others may have made/scripted, whatever, and incorporate them into various roles and RP environments -- historical settings, sci fi, anime, love nest, family home, fantasy, bordello, etc.

This is SL's market -- a very diverse one, but with this fundamental attraction to RP in common (for most if not all).

 

I agree absolutely. And I don't think it even needs to be 
marketed
as RP. All that needs to be done is to show what is possible.

Exactly -- I would not have had any idea what 3D RP was when I joined. But renting a little house, then decorating it -- that was RP for me.  Every house, every piece of furniture, every boat, every car, every outfit, every skin or hair -- all parts someone uses in creating their own RP environment, whether for private or public enjoyment. 

 

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Theresa Tennyson wrote:

...

My thinking is that SL is by nature a niche product; not so much in itself but a product FOR niches.
SL's structure allows almost anything to be done, but not as well as a dedicated platform would do the same thing for.
It's best suited for things that don't have a market big enough for someone to invest in infrastructure to support it in a dedicated way.

...

What does SL offer that other games/platforms don't have? - the ability to socialize and interact with other people via avatars in a wide variety of situations/environments. 

 


Dillon Levenque wrote:

I don't think shifting the focus from the avatar is the right idea. Our avatars represent us and in a great many cases very nearly ARE us. Not so much in how they look but in how we respond when we are inside our avatars. For a great many of us (you included, I'm certain) the great draw of Second Life is the social interaction. That being said....

Why couldn't the picture of the guy and girl show them in one of those cool motorboats in the Grand Canyon sim? Or if full-on romance is what they were pushing, why not dancing in one of the several formal dance clubs, and with a bunch of other people in the picture? That doesn't have to be staged—that actually happens, every day!

...

I agree, this would be a very good way to advertise SL.  Maybe a series of pictures from different RP areas as well as avatars taking classes, shopping, watching TV at home with a friend, etc.

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I am under the impression that SL represents THE ultimate do it yourself RP platform. That is what Your World / Your Imagination and "Second Life" means: playing a role (even one that closely approximates RL).

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