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Czari Zenovka wrote:


Ren Toxx wrote:


xeoneex wrote: [...] 
Well I give up this is too confusing, most places I seem to go has no one in it, other ones that DO, no one talks
-_-
this isn't for me.

Another common initial reaction, and I think most people agree that SL's learning curve ain't the gentlest ever. Still, after only 
one
day that you've been here, it's damn near impossible to get a fair sense of what SL is... not even the overall idea, much less the specifics and power-user knowledge; there are many, many residents who have been here for 
years
and still they're far from knowing everything that can be done in SL and how to do it. If you deem yourself a very impatient person and are perfectly OK being so, then yes, SL isn't for you... not so much because it actually isn't, but because you won't invest the time to find out that it is, and how. But if you're not that impatient, then just don't give up. Go step by step... ask questions -specific questions, not 
'how do I do everything that can be done?'
- you will certainly 
not
be below average if it takes you days, or even a couple weeks, to start finding things that interest you in SL and how they're done... because that's about as fast as most everyone else took. SL is far too big and complex a world (and it has to be, otherwise it just wouldn't be flexible enough) to 'master' it in a couple days.

Well stated, Ren.  When I first joined SL I was fortunate to meet someone who gave some excellent advice to me - to give myself eight weeks to really start to feel comfortable in SL.  That included getting used to the viewer, learning to move in SL, personalizing my avatar, finding the type places and things to do that I enjoy, etc.  I kept that in mind during some of my more frustrating learning curve days in SL, reminding myself I had only been in SL 5 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, etc.  Interestingly, it *was* at about the 8-week mark that I realized I was doing things in SL (ie. walking/flying, etc.) naturally.

The OP describes him/herself as a "hardcore gamer" and has been so for many years.  I have played two MMOs over the past 15 years as a very "lightweight gamer" but I have met hardcore gamers during that time.  Some in this category are so familiar with the general mechanics of MMOs/MMORPGs that the challenge for them is to join a new game and get to the highest level in the shortest amount of time.  I have known a few that have reached this level within 1-2 days.  This is the impression I get from the OP - he is thinking of SL as an MMO and even though there are not "levels" he is still seeking how to "master" the "game."  Having attempted to introduce some of my MMO friends to SL, and actually succeeding in one joining only to leave after two days, I don't get the impression the OP will ever "get" SL.

edit: punctuation

I started to play MMOs around 2006 and joined Second Life in 2010. And to this day, I think that my previous experiances in MMOs helped me getting around in SL within my first two weeks. I was already familiar with using my keyboard and how to research sources that offer help. I got used to the basic pretty fast.

I think its not necessary bad if someone has a heavy gameing experiance behind them. The key to staying in SL are the expections one has in mind. If you just take SL as it is or read about it before joining, its less likely that you get upset or bored.

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Syo Emerald wrote:


Czari Zenovka wrote:


Ren Toxx wrote:


xeoneex wrote: [...] 
Well I give up this is too confusing, most places I seem to go has no one in it, other ones that DO, no one talks
-_-
this isn't for me.

Another common initial reaction, and I think most people agree that SL's learning curve ain't the gentlest ever. Still, after only 
one
day that you've been here, it's damn near impossible to get a fair sense of what SL is... not even the overall idea, much less the specifics and power-user knowledge; there are many, many residents who have been here for 
years
and still they're far from knowing everything that can be done in SL and how to do it. If you deem yourself a very impatient person and are perfectly OK being so, then yes, SL isn't for you... not so much because it actually isn't, but because you won't invest the time to find out that it is, and how. But if you're not that impatient, then just don't give up. Go step by step... ask questions -specific questions, not 
'how do I do everything that can be done?'
- you will certainly 
not
be below average if it takes you days, or even a couple weeks, to start finding things that interest you in SL and how they're done... because that's about as fast as most everyone else took. SL is far too big and complex a world (and it has to be, otherwise it just wouldn't be flexible enough) to 'master' it in a couple days.

Well stated, Ren.  When I first joined SL I was fortunate to meet someone who gave some excellent advice to me - to give myself eight weeks to really start to feel comfortable in SL.  That included getting used to the viewer, learning to move in SL, personalizing my avatar, finding the type places and things to do that I enjoy, etc.  I kept that in mind during some of my more frustrating learning curve days in SL, reminding myself I had only been in SL 5 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, etc.  Interestingly, it *was* at about the 8-week mark that I realized I was doing things in SL (ie. walking/flying, etc.) naturally.

The OP describes him/herself as a "hardcore gamer" and has been so for many years.  I have played two MMOs over the past 15 years as a very "lightweight gamer" but I have met hardcore gamers during that time.  Some in this category are so familiar with the general mechanics of MMOs/MMORPGs that the challenge for them is to join a new game and get to the highest level in the shortest amount of time.  I have known a few that have reached this level within 1-2 days.  This is the impression I get from the OP - he is thinking of SL as an MMO and even though there are not "levels" he is still seeking how to "master" the "game."  Having attempted to introduce some of my MMO friends to SL, and actually succeeding in one joining only to leave after two days, I don't get the impression the OP will ever "get" SL.

edit: punctuation

I started to play MMOs around 2006 and joined Second Life in 2010. And to this day, I think that my previous experiances in MMOs helped me getting around in SL within my first two weeks. I was already familiar with using my keyboard and how to research sources that offer help. I got used to the basic pretty fast.

I think its not necessary bad if someone has a heavy gameing experiance behind them. The key to staying in SL are the expections one has in mind. If you just take SL as it is or read about it before joining, its less likely that you get upset or bored.

Oh I agree, Syo.  I am thankful for my experience in MMOs (began playing in 1999) and also agree that having that experience helped a LOT with becoming familiar with especially avatar movement and the basics of "touching" something to have it open or perform some function, etc. in SL.

My point was regarding those people who identify as "hardcore gamers" which could mean anything from the number of hours per day spent playing or, as I mentioned, those people who like the challenge of "winning" or "mastering" a new game as quickly as possilbe.  I have a friend that I would consider a hardcore gamer who anticipated the arrival of a new MMO (now can't recall which one, but was introduced maybe two-three years ago) for a year before the game went live.  About two weeks after he left the game to play the new one, he returned to the older one.  I said I was surprised to see him back so soon and his response was that he had achieved maximum level in the new game and was bored with the it.  I'm thinking this *could* be the situation with the OP and his frustration that he can't "start playing" immediately.

Or not. :matte-motes-wink:

 

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Some gaming experience may be beneficial but when one is used to the "feel" of the controls in one ( or more ) games it takes awhile to adjust to a different "feel".  I found/find the controls in this game overly sensitive so that my avi ends up walking in a zig-zag path rather than a straight line.  Reminds me of when I first took my slalom-style whitewater kayak out after having several years experience paddling small white water in an open 2-man canoe.  Pilot friends of mine also mentioned that the same happens when learning to fly.  You end up over-compensating and instead of flying in a straight line you zig-zag.

Most of my gaming experience is in games with a god-view where as SL seems to feel more like a first-person shooter game (although I'm not sure since I don't play those games).  Although I wouldn't label myself as a hardcore gamer I have spent the last year and a half playing Guild Wars 2 (love it).  My first MMO.  This Dec I started playing WoW with my friends and I have to say I don't really like it.  I get so frustrated having to come to a stop before casting a spell.  I'm used to the fast-paced combat of GW2.  I've played WoW maybe about a dozen times and my highest character is at level 48 or so but still I haven't gotten used to the feel of it.  So having experience in one game doesn't mean that a new one will feel comfortable.

 

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Thats funny, cause I hated GW2. Its so damn uncomfortable for me. No option to send stuff from one character to another, no horses or else to ride but damn expensive teleporting instead and a world that feels unopen to me. What killed the game for me was the grinding that already started at lvl 15 or so. So I abonded GW2 rather quickly, maybe reached lvl 40 with one character.

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Studio09 wrote:

Some gaming experience may be beneficial but when one is used to the "feel" of the controls in one ( or more ) games it takes awhile to adjust to a different "feel".  I found/find the controls in this game overly sensitive so that my avi ends up walking in a zig-zag path rather than a straight line.  Reminds me of when I first took my slalom-style whitewater kayak out after having several years experience paddling small white water in an open 2-man canoe.  Pilot friends of mine also mentioned that the same happens when learning to fly.  You end up over-compensating and instead of flying in a straight line you zig-zag.

I learned to fly a Cessna 152, but also got to take the controls of a Piper Cub. The former is wheel, the latter is stick. That change didn't bother me, I didn't find myself zig zagging. But the 152 had flaps, the Cub did not. That difference results in a huge change in pitch (152 nose down, Cub nose up)) during landing. And you fly the Cub from the back seat, not the front! The first time I tried to land the Cub, I nearly drove it into the ground. After an afternoon of practice in the Cub, I returned to the 152 and it felt like I was flying a hot air balloon. I could not get the damned thing out of the sky.

So yes, "feel" makes a big difference, and must be shaken. I'm in awe of folks who can land virtually anything (taking off is easy).

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Syo Emerald wrote:

Thats funny, cause I hated GW2. Its so damn uncomfortable for me. ...

You must be used to a different game, which is another example of different controls not feeling right to what you are used to.  I think most people have a difficult time getting used to the movement and camera controls of Second Life.  It takes time to adjust.  On my first free shopping expeditions I made my avi walk up and down the stairs, trying to get used to controlling her walking and she ended up falling over the raillings a couple of times.  Good thing there's flying in SL. :smileyhappy:

 

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Madelaine McMasters wrote:


Studio09 wrote:

Some gaming experience may be beneficial but when one is used to the "feel" of the controls in one ( or more ) games it takes awhile to adjust to a different "feel".  I found/find the controls in this game overly sensitive so that my avi ends up walking in a zig-zag path rather than a straight line.  Reminds me of when I first took my slalom-style whitewater kayak out after having several years experience paddling small white water in an open 2-man canoe.  Pilot friends of mine also mentioned that the same happens when learning to fly.  You end up over-compensating and instead of flying in a straight line you zig-zag.

I learned to fly a Cessna 152, but also got to take the controls of a Piper Cub. The former is wheel, the latter is stick. That change didn't bother me, I didn't find myself zig zagging. But the 152 had flaps, the Cub did not. That difference results in a huge change in pitch (152 nose down, Cub nose up)) during landing. And you fly the Cub from the back seat, not the front! The first time I tried to land the Cub, I nearly drove it into the ground. After an afternoon of practice in the Cub, I returned to the 152 and it felt like I was flying a hot air balloon. I could not get the damned thing out of the sky.

So yes, "feel" makes a big difference, and must be shaken. I'm in awe of folks who can land virtually anything (taking off is easy).

I might have assumed they meant that they zig-zagged, because that was what I did when I first took my kayak out in slow water.  They said I was over-compensating like they did when they learned to fly.

When I lived in the bush in Alaska, it seemed like everyone had their own plane or at least knew how to fly.  The first time I flew was in a small prop, I think a Cessna.  Every kid in the village could identify the sound of their dad's plane and could recognize any kind of plane flying over by sight.    I always wanted to learn to fly. I was studying the training manual for passing the pilot's test but ended up moving back to the lower 48.  Do you get a chance to do much flying now?

I understand about the lack of flaps.  The one time I went hang-gliding the instructor emphasized pushing the bar forward to bring the nose up when landing.  Not too far up and stall but enough so we wouldn't take a nose dive into the sand. Edit: Actually he said it was like a controlled stall.

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Lots of people decide to give SL a try and give up. There is a learning curve and it takes time. Sounds like you should give Sweethearts Jazz Club a try. It's a PG sim for people to meet. Although some people, like myself, aren't there looking for anything more than friendship. It is a romantic venue, not adult, like I said it's PG and the people there are pretty friendly. There is still private messaging going on but they also use local and group chat. Some clubs are almost dead quiet in local chat, except for maybe the pre-made "gestures", like ♡☆♡☆wooo! I love this song!!! ♡☆♡☆♡. There is a website www.sweetheartscentral.com the shows more about it.

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SL is not chat
SL is not a game
SL is not a builder sandbox
SL is not a community
SL is not free XXX
SL is not about nekos
SL is not about breedable minipets
SL is not for losers
SL is not for winners
SL is not for griefers
SL is not for wimps
SL is not about land
SL is not about freeloaders

 

SL kind of is not anything...

Or it could be all of that stuff.

SL kind of is... about figuring oneself out.

 

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Has no one pointed you to Search or the Destination Guide

Plus there is a Destination guide in the viewer. It has the What's Hot Now category. It lists regions with 20 to 25 people in them. After 25 they drop out to keep the region from getting too crowded.

SL Search is weak. But, it will get you started. Until you are experienced in SL you probably won't notice its short comings.

The web Destinations Guide is excellent. It gets out of date and occasionally a destination (called regions) is down and the link fails.

There are currently 12 chat hubs listed, places where people go to talk.

The in world Map shows where people are. You just have realize when your in a region you have to look at the mini-map to find out where they are. People can be above and below you. The symbols point up and down for above and below you. But, that only works up to 1,000m, then it stop indicating correctly. 

You are going to find a lot of robots. They either don't talk or ramble on inanely. 

Search groups for the types of things you are interested in. Some groups are oriented toward RL geographic areas, Japanese, American, European... those groups will have a time of day bias as for when users are on. Ask in groups close to your interests to find out what else is available. There are political, philosophical, role play, sex oriented, BDSM, and on and on.

You will find lots of sexual stuff in SL. The people here know sex sells and gets lots of advertising dollars. So, it gets prominence. But, you can filter it.

Games are simple compared to SL. The viewer has over 3,000 controls. Users are building the content in SL. Just as a few people mod games, most users in SL 'mod' or build stuff for use in SL.

Everything is here. But, wondering around SL is like driving around in RL trying to find a good restaurant. That doesn't work well. You need some search, networking, and computer skills to find things in SL.

In most games I run through all the controls and spend time figuring out how things work before playing. Especially in interactive games (MMO). What games have you been playing?

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