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NSA spying on Second Life


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I'd like to hear from Linden Lab as to what they are doing about the NSA spying on it's residents? You are already a very closed mouthed secretive company, but this is ridiculous.


Quote "The media reports allege US and UK spies spent years investigating online games including Second Life for potential terrorist activity."

From:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-25310774

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I'd like to hear from Linden Lab as to what they are doing about the NSA spying on it's residents?

 

Not a chance in hell, no way. It was after  all Corey Ondrejka himself who invited the NSA over and told them what a rich field online games, and particularly SL, are for building up spy networks. And if Corey knew, then Philip knew about it as well, and M after him and now Rod.

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Anyone, including NSA agents, can create an anonymous account, so there is no way LL can tell who they are or if they are even still around.  So what do you expect LL to do,  require everyone to submit proof of identity and proof who employs them then independently verify that information?  Even if they did,  I assure you that anyone that works as a spy for the NSA is going to have airtight and verifiable information that they are employed by someone other than the NSA.

As far as hearing from LL about it, don't hold your breath. They won't even communicate with us about mundane matters.

If you want to change what the government is doing, the only way to do that is to elect representatives  that will have the authority and the will to put a stop to it.

I also agree with Grif.  Those other companies you site are no respecters of privacy and already spy on you  if you use their services much more and at a deeper level than the NSA ever would and make money off the data they collect.  Their objections are just PR and a joke.

 

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Why is everyone concerned about their online privacy? If you aren't doing anything wrong then why the commotion? Is it because you are doing stuff you know is wrong the reason why some are so upset at being spied on? If someone catches you cheating on your spouse, should you be mad at them for catching you? If someone finds out you hate a certain race of people, is that their fault or yours? If it is found out you plan to bomb a particular place and they stop you, who should be mad? You that they stopped you? I hope everyone is spying on everyone to keep you retards from messing everything up.

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I'm not one of the idiots with Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare, Blogs, etc. Throwing my **bleep** out there for everyone to see. So no I don't dare use any of those services because I'm not part of the naive Sheeple community.  I don't search with Google nor Yahoo nor Bing.


PS. You think its worse that companies spy on you then the GOVERNMENT!!!. Have you lost your freaking mind.  HUGE DIFFERENCE THERE MS. LIBTARD. HUGE.  And your naive thinking that the people in D.C. Elected by politically ignorant Americans are going to change anything your dreaming. There ruining everything as we speak elected by T.V. brainwashed Sheeple who either are completely political ignorant or don't vote at all or simply do not care.  WELCOME TO REALITY.

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A3123 wrote:

 If you aren't doing anything wrong then why the commotion?



If you think that there aren't people in jail who did no wrong, or legitimately did not think they were doing any wrong, guess again.

 


A3123 wrote:

Why is everyone concerned about their online privacy?


Quit thinking Orwell and try thinking Kafka.  

"When the nothing-to-hide argument is unpacked, and its underlying assumptions examined and challenged, we can see how it shifts the debate to its terms, then draws power from its unfair advantage. The nothing-to-hide argument speaks to some problems but not to others. It represents a singular and narrow way of conceiving of privacy, and it wins by excluding consideration of the other problems often raised with government security measures. When engaged directly, the nothing-to-hide argument can ensnare, for it forces the debate to focus on its narrow understanding of privacy. But when confronted with the plurality of privacy problems implicated by government data collection and use beyond surveillance and disclosure, the nothing-to-hide argument, in the end, has nothing to say."

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