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why can't i run sl now if four days ago i could?


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Little,

PC Performer is a malware product and you are now infected with it and any other junk it has brought down and auto-installed on your PC.

http://guides.yoosecurity.com/how-to-remove-pc-performer-virus-uninstall-pc-performer-fake-software/

You need to get your PC cleaned up and repaired 1st before worrying about SecondLife.

Question: What tech man helped you? The one from the PC Performer company?

Please update your question as follows:

Select the Options drop-down menu to the right of your question and select Edit Question in order to update your original question with the details we have requested.

 

::edited to correct spelling error

 

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Little,

PC Performer is a malware product and you are now infected with it and any other junk it has brought down and auto-installed on your PC.

http://guides.yoosecurity.com/how-to-remove-pc-performer-virus-uninstall-pc-performer-fake-software/

You need to get your PC cleaned up and repaired 1st before worrying about SecondLife.

Question: What tech man helped you? The one from the PC Performer company?

Please update your question as follows:

Select the Options drop-down menu to the right of your question and select Edit Question in order to update your original question with the details we have requested.

 

::edited to correct spelling error

 

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Welcome to Second Life Answers, littlehermione.

I'm not suggesting the "tech" who you had in doesn't know what they're doing, but it sounds like he's done to your computer what a kitten would do with a ball of wool.

Edited, because Karen's answer makes way more sense than mine, and the OP certainly doesn't need the confusion that my post may have unintentionally added.

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What I wonder is that when your "tech" guy reinstalled Windows what did he do before he went that drastic route?  I mean, if you are going to start over with an operating system you really need to start over...from scratch.  Formating and reinstalling is starting over from a 3rd base.......basically only the software for user controlled part of the OS (plus, of course, all the third party software) is "removed" and presented in it's original configuration.  All that registry stuff remains pretty much untouched.  You're starting over but only with the stuff you see and interact with......the guts of the OS remain as before (untouched).  Most malware places code in the registry that, you reinstall the OS, regenerates itself and you are back to square one......the problem is still there just as if you did nothing to fix it.

To get a clean and complete operating reinstallation you must do one of two things.  Wipe the drive that the OS resides on before reinstalling the OS.  Or get a new drive to install the OS on.  A drive wipe is cheaper (of course) but it's time consuming.........it took me just over 25 hours to wipe my 500 gig HD the last time I did it (I used a pretty secure method with 3 passes though........a single pass would probably work for something like your problem).  There are some good disk wipe utilities on the Internet that are free (most are somewhat limited but adequate for a simple disk wipe).  You can also purchase full blown disk wipe utilitites that are pretty close to the cost of a new hard drive.........decision time in that case.  A new hard drive is quicker and easier if you don't mind a little surgery on your computer (desk tops are easy but laptops can be complicated.........just opening the case can be a nightmare). 

And the most expensive way is to get a new computer......but is also very unnecesssary. Once you get a hard core virus or mal-ware on your system, you have to use hard core methods to get rid of it.  Prevention is the real solution but that is sometimes just not possible if you want to use your computer at all.  I've had infections myself and I do know how to "prevent" them...........but it happens eventually to everyone.

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This information may help you, or, another Resident here, who can help you.

I believe this is the GPU, Graphics Processing Unit, (Graphics Card), that is inside your Laptop Computer.

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

The Intel GMA X3100 graphics card, released in 2007, with support for DirectX 10. This integrated card, which shares system memory for processing, is included on motherboards for mobile systems. The X3100 offers a number of enhancements over earlier members of the integrated Intel card series, and offers scalar shading and memory management technology to help the system squeeze a high degree of performance out of an underpowered architecture. If your system processor is capable of handling the extra demand, you can tweak your X3100 to support more DirectX 10 operations.


1 Click the Windows-logo button in the lower-left-hand corner of the screen, then "Control Panel."

2 Double-click "Intel X3100."

3 Click "Advanced Configuration."


4 Navigate the tabs on the Advanced Configuration window and alter the settings as you wish. Scale up most settings by dragging the slider bar toward the right of the screen, and reduce them by dragging it to the left.


5 Click "Apply."



 

GMA X3100

The GMA X3100 is the mobile version of the GMA X3000 used in the Intel GL960/GM965 chipsets and also in the GS965 chipset. The X3100 supports hardware transform and lighting, up to 128 programmable shader units, and up to 384 MB memory. Its display cores can run up to 333 MHz on GM965 and 320 MHz on GL960. Its render cores can run up to 500 MHz on GM965 and 400 MHz on GL960. The X3100 display unit includes a 300 MHz RAMDAC, two 25–112 MHz LVDS transmitters, 2 DVO encoders, and a TV encoder. In addition, the hardware supports DirectX 10.0,[3] Shader Model 3.0 and OpenGL 1.5.[12]

 

 

 

 

 

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Hello,

if all the above hints don't work, take a look at http://community.secondlife.com/t5/English-Knowledge-Base/Graphics-cards/ta-p/700073

 

As a last option you could manually add your graphics adapter to the gpu_table.txt file in the Second Life folder - at your own risk!

 

ETA: If you're a premium member, you should contact support about your issue at https://support.secondlife.com/contact-support/

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