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Can you check another avatar's ping?


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I am not aware of a method that will allow you to see another Residents Ping Sim, or, Ping User.

You should have requested for that Resident to tell you what they think your Ping is, and then to clarify which Ping they are talking about, Sim / User

Then, open your Statistics Bar, to confirm that they are full of bologna.

 

 

http://community.secondlife.com/t5/English-Knowledge-Base/How-to-improve-Viewer-performance/ta-p/1316923#Section_.3

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I was DJing at the time - maybe as  the land-owner he could check my stream ping?

I would think that he could ping from his machine to the stream server. In fact, he wouldn't have to be a landowner to do it, but unless that stream is served directly from your machine (unlikely, and a Very Bad Idea), that would tell him nothing about the ping time to your machine.

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Principally it seems to be possible to test how good is a connection of the avatar and how good is the avatar's machine by using a RLV-enable viewer. RLV has a number of commands awaiting a response from the viewer. For example a "@version=channel" command. The protocol is this:

 

  1. A scrip in avatars object (e.g.) relay opens a chat listen on a channel, e,g, 222, than issues a command
    llOwnerSay("@version=222");
  2. This is a message sent by script directly to the viewer using by the avatar.The string "@version=222" is thus passed over the server - viewer connection and is delayed in respect of the connection speed.
  3. The viewer receives the message and understands as command to reply the viewer's version on the channel 222 (if the viewer supports RLV, if not it just displays the message.)
  4. The response again is sent over the viewer - server connection and is the faster the better the connection is.
  5. The script in the scripted device receives the message and calculates the "ping" value.

However, in most cases you have a device that is owned by you and not by the avatar. In that case there will be also a step 0, when your device sends a RLV Relay message towards the relay worn by the avatar, This message is a command to request viewer's version and this will make an additional delay by script - script connection.

From the step 1 on, there will be three delays until you receive the viewr's response, those in steps 2 and 4 are caused by the viewr - server connection and are as bad as the ping of the avatar's machine. The delay in step 3 is caused by the machine itself and determine how fast the machine is but can also hapen because of the virus scan program and similar loads at the moment.

So with this technique you can quess the avatar's ping but not measure an exact value, but principlly it is possible.

PS. Two links about that

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The avatar you want check the ping must have a RLV-enabled viewer and possibly an active relay. Unless you implement that check by a device and give them the device, than the device can communicate with the viewer directly without a relay. But their viewer must understand the RLV commands. Your viewer must not be RLV-capable.


This is an interesting idea actually to implmement such a thing and test on myself how much the ping value calculated this way differs from the ping value shown in the statistics bar. If i get time i'll try that :)

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Jenna Felton wrote:

Principally it seems to be possible to test how good is a connection of the avatar and how good is the avatar's machine by using a RLV-enable viewer. RLV has a number of commands awaiting a response from the viewer. For example a "@version=channel" command. The protocol is this:

 
  1. A scrip in avatars object (e.g.) relay opens a chat listen on a channel, e,g, 222, than issues a command

    llOwnerSay("@version=222");
  2. This is a message sent by script directly to the viewer using by the avatar.The string "
    @version=222
    " is thus passed over the server - viewer connection and is delayed in respect of the connection speed.
  3. The viewer receives the message and understands as command to reply the viewer's version on the channel 222 (if the viewer supports RLV, if not it just displays the message.)
  4. The response again is sent over the viewer - server connection and is the faster the better the connection is.
  5. The script in the scripted device receives the message and calculates the "ping" value.

However, in most cases you have a device that is owned by you and not by the avatar. In that case there will be also a step 0, when your device sends a RLV Relay message towards the relay worn by the avatar, This message is a command to request viewer's version and this will make an additional delay by script - script connection.

From the step 1 on, there will be three delays until you receive the viewr's response, those in steps 2 and 4 are caused by the viewr - server connection and are as bad as the ping of the avatar's machine. The delay in step 3 is caused by the machine itself and determine how fast the machine is but can also hapen because of the virus scan program and similar loads at the moment.

So with this technique you can quess the avatar's ping but not measure an exact value, but principlly it is possible.

PS. Two links about that

 

 

LOL.

Thanks for the laugh Jenna. That's the most Rube Goldberg thing I"ve ever seen for checking ping.

Of course it wouldn't work, since the server can, under load, delay script execution and therefore delay any scripted replies.  Somefimes for up to 15 seconds.

And of course if it did work, you could easily do it without RLV.

 

The simplest solution is usually the best. You ran a stream, checking the Ping on a stream is trivial, and bad pings on streams = choppy music that cuts out constantly. So likely that was not only how he checked, but why he checked.

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MistyBeethoven wrote:

Thank you jenna.

 

I asked and he said he was talking about a script I was wearing that 'constantly pinging the sim and making it unstable'.

I looked for script errors in logged chat but there was only the occasional problem with (prsumably) a resizing script in a tux cuff.

 

Does this sound more plausible?

Whoever this person is, I would ignore them. It doesn't sound like they know what they are talking about either. A script 'pinging' even in the worst possible case of, lets say, a sensor every 0.25 seconds, can't make a sim 'unstable'.

Not only that, but someone else in the sim can't see that anyway. They are just messing with you it sounds like.

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Agreed that he sounds full of it. It certainly is a lot different from detecting ping time, but I suppose he could see frequent object updates (from Develop menu, Control-Alt-Shift-U) and decide that's hurting the sim. I don't know one way or another whether that would show for attachments, and I'm too lazy to check. :matte-motes-bashful:

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