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Wow, that is interesting but I don't think its hard to explain at all. Aside from the fact that "long-term linden" is an oxymoron these days, his tweet reminding the lab that "you run a ****ing world" speaks volumes. Its also an open door for a little fun! What does everyone else think he meant by saying that?

Here are my guesses:

Second Life is not a game, stop treating it like one.

There are real people behind the avatars, start treating them like that.

Second Life... don't forget about it because it is still paying your salary while you play with iPad apps.

Or just take it literally...

Zindra and the adult places are all that's left of a once-active virtual world... so Second Life really is just a ****ing world! :matte-motes-big-grin-squint:

Good luck Yoz!

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Hmmm, this is precisely the problem; we have people like this running SL.

His 'tweet' is ambiguous. Could mean anything.  However, it is more than likely it does not augur well for us in the log term.

But, here we have a Linden on his way out thanking...wait for it....not the poor sap residents, who have paid his wage and Friday afternoon parties, but instead he thanks..... LL.

What also speaks volumes is the fact he does not choose to make a post in the forums connected with the job, but does the social media thing.  Good riddance.

It beggers belief we do not seem to have anyone at LL who realises the residents are customers (whilst a PIU, myself, running two parcels, even the 'free' residents contribute by simply being there, keeping the numbers up and making it a VW that new residents want to play and stay in)

 

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ChuckBaggett wrote:

Long term Linden Lab employee Yoz LInden (Yoz Grahame) is no longer with Linden Lab.

I don't see an explanation yet.

Good riddance.  His "tweet" reeks of the trendy "lets use profanity to look cool" devolving communication skills.

Since when does it matter if an middle-rank employee of a company moves on?  In my RL job with a very visible company, other than the CEO and those at that high decision making level, the public was not aware of who we were, nor commented on our employment status. Who cares why he's moved on? I don't require an explanation. 

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I was looking at your profile just the other day, small world. I cannot recall at this time, what lead to finding your profile.

 

 I've never met Yoz, and I have no idea what role, he or she played at the Lab.

The Lab must have liked Yoz when they hired him.

Something changed.

How much have Residents changed since joining SL; and how much has SL (LL) changed? Which is greater?

 

Farewell Yoz,  Residents will never get to know both sides of the story. Information is knowledge, knowledge is power, both of those commodities are coveted for profit.

 

 

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Celestiall Nightfire wrote:


ChuckBaggett wrote:

Long term Linden Lab employee Yoz LInden (Yoz Grahame) is no longer with Linden Lab.

I don't see an explanation yet.

Good riddance.  His "tweet" reeks of the trendy "lets use profanity to look cool" devolving communication skills.

Since when does it matter if an middle-rank employee of a company moves on?  In my RL job with a very visible company, other than the CEO and those at that high decision making level, the public was not aware of who we were, nor commented on our employment status. Who cares why he's moved on? I don't require an explanation. 

This ^^

Glad someone with his attitude is gone.

 

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So much to-do about a little f-bomb. Two nations separated by a common language.

I hope and trust that Yoz will find greener pastures.

Meanwhile, in the silver-lining department, LL has apparently lured recruited a new CFO, a position that must demand even more courage than fixing SL bugs.

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Qie Niangao wrote:

So much to-do about a little f-bomb.

It's immature, unprofessional and lacking in public civility. 

As such, I would not hire the guy.  Companies do internet searches, and Tweets, Facebook, and blogs all give insight into a person's nature.  How someone handles the public news of leaving a company says volumes about them.  That Tweet alone tells me that he's not someone, that I would want working at a company, for a product I use.

Perhaps the old LL culture was one of dubious professionalism, but if LL wants to be taken serious, then cleaning up language is a good place to start. The language we use tells people who we are.

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Celestiall Nightfire wrote:


Qie Niangao wrote:

So much to-do about a little f-bomb.

It's immature, unprofessional and lacking in public civility. 

As such, I would not hire the guy.  Companies do internet searches, and Tweets, Facebook, and blogs all give insight into a person's nature.  How someone handles the public news of leaving a company says volumes about them.  That Tweet alone tells me that he's not someone, that I would want working at a company, for a product I use.

Perhaps the old LL culture was one of dubious professionalism, but if LL wants to be taken serious, then cleaning up language is a good place to start. The language we use tells people who we are.

This ^^

 

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Rolig Loon wrote:


Celestiall Nightfire wrote:


Qie Niangao wrote:

So much to-do about a little f-bomb.

It's immature, unprofessional and lacking in public civility. 

As such, I would not hire the guy.  Companies do internet searches, and Tweets, Facebook, and blogs all give insight into a person's nature.  How someone handles the public news of leaving a company says volumes about them.  That Tweet alone tells me that he's not someone, that I would want working at a company, for a product I use.

Perhaps the old LL culture was one of dubious professionalism, but if LL wants to be taken serious, then cleaning up language is a good place to start. The language we use tells people who we are.

This ^^

 

This indeed. There is a time and a place for everything. Being unable to make those distinctions tells me that Yoz has some growing up to do, and I wouldn't want him/her growing up on my nickel.

This is yet another example of the need for people in the Facebook/Twitter age to grasp the wisdom of Pogo...

"We have met the enemy... and he is us."

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Madelaine McMasters wrote:

There is a time and a place for everything. 


I hate to dwell on what I consider a non-issue, but I must point out that it's his personal Twitter account, not one associated with his former employer. Although such dinosaurs surely still exist, any organization or individual proposing to judge one's choice of the coarse vernacular from one's personal account "has some growing-up to do" concerning both technology and language. (That said, I reiterate the bit about "two nations separated by a common language" because apparently Yoz's usage doesn't translate well: some here seem to read it as badmouthing his former employer, yet I read it as quite -- almost poignantly -- the opposite.)

In another thread, I contrasted the mean-spiritedness of this thread with that of a parallel one across the street. I stand by that. Whatever one's reaction to a single tweet, we're discussing the departure of a Linden of long standing, who has contributed to the functionality of this platform we share, and who expressed his continued belief in its possibilities, come what may. It seems obvious what language is appropriate in this time and place.

I don't know Yoz personally, but I wish him well.

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Qie Niangao wrote:


Madelaine McMasters wrote:

There is a time and a place for everything. 


I hate to dwell on what I consider a non-issue, but I must point out that it's his personal Twitter account, not one associated with his former employer. Although such dinosaurs surely still exist, any organization or individual proposing to judge one's choice of the coarse vernacular from one's personal account "has some growing-up to do" concerning both technology and language. (That said, I reiterate the bit about "two nations separated by a common language" because apparently Yoz's usage doesn't translate well: some here seem to read it as badmouthing his former employer, yet I read it as quite -- almost poignantly -- the opposite.)

In another thread, I contrasted the mean-spiritedness of this thread with that of a parallel one across the street. I stand by that. Whatever one's reaction to a single tweet, we're discussing the departure of a Linden of long standing, who has contributed to the functionality of this platform we share, and who expressed his continued belief in its possibilities, come what may. It seems obvious what language is appropriate in this time and place.

I don't know Yoz personally, but I wish him well.

"two nations separated by a common language".  Yes, interesting, because, your comment here is a prime example. 

You have labeled this thread as "mean-spirited" because the people that posted here voiced their opinion that someone who tweets publicly about their former employer, and utilizes trendy profanity-laced vernacular to make their point, is better off gone.  Being honest is not the same as being mean. But, you've decided its "mean" since you don't like what was written here.

I never thought that the tweet was "badmouthing" his employer.  You seem to be operating from a lot of assumptions.  Intent is not the issue. The tweet was ill-conceived, because of the language used.  It shows lack of respect and knowledge for what is acceptable public discourse.  This devolving of common courtesy and casual acceptance of vulgar language in everyday use will get no endorsement from me.   It's the lack of awareness and disregard for a standard, by which civil communication is done, which is the bellwether for other issues.

The amazing part is that you do not seem to understand that social media is not separate from the rest of our lives.  A tweet, a blog post, a Facebook post/comment, all of this is the composite of who we are.   Yoz, used his real life Twitter account to make that Tweet.  It's forever linked to his real life.  This type of behavior resonates like a wave through the behavioral patterns of someone's life.  Future employers, future dates and mates, all these people can research and make judgments.  The impact of this is already huge, but will get bigger.  

I work in the tech world for a very successful company, and I can't imagine one or our employees doing such a tweet, without knowing that they not only just burned their bridges, but also have burned many future opportunities.  This is not some "dinosaur" thinking.  It's real, it's current, and it will affect many people’s lives.

 

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Celestiall Nightfire wrote

I work in the tech world for a very successful company, and I can't imagine one or our employees doing such a tweet, without knowing that they not only just burned their bridges, but also have burned many future opportunities.  This is not some "dinosaur" thinking.  It's real, it's current, and it will affect many people’s lives.

 

While I agree it is 'professionally' dangerous to make a Tweet like that,  we are still all guessing the intent.

For all we know he could be quoting Rod. 

It could be a catch phrase at the Lab.

They could even have banners with that saying up in all the break rooms at Linden Lab.

 

P.s.  Please don't try to tell me that CEO's don't cuss.  Some of the most profanity laced rants I have ever heard have came out of a CEO's mouth.

 

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Perrie Juran wrote:


Celestiall Nightfire wrote

I work in the tech world for a very successful company, and I can't imagine one or our employees doing such a tweet, without knowing that they not only just burned their bridges, but also have burned many future opportunities.  This is not some "dinosaur" thinking.  It's real, it's current, and it will affect many people’s lives.

 

While I agree it is 'professionally' dangerous to make a Tweet like that,  we are still all guessing the intent.

For all we know he could be quoting Rod. 

It could be a catch phrase at the Lab.

They could even have banners with that saying up in all the break rooms at Linden Lab.

 

P.s.  Please don't try to tell me that CEO's don't cuss.  Some of the most profanity laced rants I have ever heard have came out of a CEO's mouth.

 

Based on another thread re: using this forum or SLU, I mosied over to SLU  yesterday.  I can see why the reception of how the announcement was phrased would be different there than here.

Birds of a feather apparently do flock together. ;)

 

ETA:  I didn't post this in response to Perrie - it was meant to be a general follow-up post.

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Perrie Juran wrote:


Celestiall Nightfire wrote

I work in the tech world for a very successful company, and I can't imagine one or our employees doing such a tweet, without knowing that they not only just burned their bridges, but also have burned many future opportunities.  This is not some "dinosaur" thinking.  It's real, it's current, and it will affect many people’s lives.

 

While I agree it is 'professionally' dangerous to make a Tweet like that,  we are still all guessing the intent.

For all we know he could be quoting Rod. 

It could be a catch phrase at the Lab.

They could even have banners with that saying up in all the break rooms at Linden Lab.

 

P.s.  Please don't try to tell me that CEO's don't cuss.  Some of the most profanity laced rants I have ever heard have came out of a CEO's mouth.

 

Of course CEO's cuss. I was cussed out a few times by the president of a company I worked for. But it was not done in public. And while that particular president might hire someone who's Facebook/Twitter account contains cussing, he'd have to see a context that explains it.

I've a friend who's fairly high up at one of the world's largest temporary employment agencies and he calls Facebook and Twitter ticking personal time bombs. I've also read that large companies are using Facebook as a way to weed out candidates, not weed them in. I'm sure Yoz will find sympathetic ears in the software development industry, which is filled with small shops that don't mind, or even appreciate edgy public behavior, and perhaps I've missed a cultural reference that takes the edge off his statement, but I've encountered enough of this behavior in my own search for competent help that I'd look elsewhere.

My teen neighbor, who is a music major and has quite a foul mouth when he's angry or excited, has a remarkably clean Facebook page, and has told me that he's already seeing friends get blowback from both colleges and prospective employers for Facebook faux pas.

Like it or not, the internet does not distinguish between the public and private faces of its denizens.

And if you are arguing that an organization that appears to be as professionally run as LL might have banners with that saying in all the break rooms, I'll ask you if you haven't just supported Celestiall's view! ;-)

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Qie Niangao wrote:


Madelaine McMasters wrote:

There is a time and a place for everything. 


I hate to dwell on what I consider a non-issue, but I must point out that it's his personal Twitter account, not one associated with his former employer. Although such dinosaurs surely still exist, any organization or individual proposing to judge one's choice of the coarse vernacular from one's personal account "has some growing-up to do" concerning both technology and language. (That said, I reiterate the bit about "two nations separated by a common language" because apparently Yoz's usage doesn't translate well: some here seem to read it as badmouthing his former employer, yet I read it as quite -- almost poignantly -- the opposite.)

In another thread, I contrasted the mean-spiritedness of this thread with that of a parallel one across the street. I stand by that. Whatever one's reaction to a single tweet, we're discussing the departure of a Linden of long standing, who has contributed to the functionality of this platform we share, and who expressed his continued belief in its possibilities, come what may. It seems obvious what language is appropriate in this time and place.

I don't know Yoz personally, but I wish him well.

That there are two camps of understanding here suggests that if Yoz's intent was to express admiration for LL, the wording wasn't up to the task. If the intent was to highlight a heartfelt disagreement with LL over something, again the wording wasn't up to the task.

I also wish Yoz well, and hope that expressing my belief that such rants appear immature is, if not helpful, at least a reminder that dinosaurs still roam the Earth.

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Perrie Juran wrote:

While I agree it is 'professionally' dangerous to make a Tweet like that,  we are still all guessing the intent.


Intent is not relevant.   It's the lack of comprehending socially acceptable standards for public discourse.

 


Perrie Juran wrote:

While I agree it is 'professionally' dangerous to make a Tweet like that,  we are still all guessing the intent.

For all we know he could be quoting Rod. 

It could be a catch phrase at the Lab.

They could even have banners with that saying up in all the break rooms at Linden Lab.


 

Again, not relevant.  The Tweet was public.   Can be seen by anyone on the internet.  

"Linden Lab....F**KNG WORLD"..!   Seriously?!

LL is a company that is trying to attract new customers.  Trying to launch new products, and this is the type of language that is now linked to the company. 

 


Perrie Juran wrote:

P.s.  Please don't try to tell me that CEO's don't cuss.  Some of the most profanity laced rants I have ever heard have came out of a CEO's mouth.


 

Again, not relevant.  

Most people cuss, at some point in their lives.  But, to link a publicly viewable profanity-laced Tweet to the company you just left, is beyond comprehension.   Do you realize that the word "F**king" is considered profanity right?  

You do realize that a company like Linden does not even allow us to use that language here on the forums as this is all searchable on the internet.  This is the same company that allows minors in and they share our grid.  The same company that is launching new products which look to be targeting a customer base aimed at youth or children. 

So, with all that said, a former employee who does not consider these factors, is better off gone.  Sorry, you don't like the reality of the situation.  

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Madelaine McMasters wrote:

I also wish Yoz well, and hope that expressing my belief that such rants appear immature is, if not helpful, at least a reminder that dinosaurs still roam the Earth.

You're not a dinosaur Maddy.   That term was used to imply that you, I and others here on this thread are out of touch.  Understanding publicly accepted civil discourse is not age related.   I'm well acquainted with many people in their 20s who would never have made such a Tweet because they are more aware, and understand how the internet works. 

My older son works for a company that sells electronics, computers, and related items.  He keeps his Facebook private to friends, and is careful of what he posts.  He knows that his online activity can be linked back to his public position at  his company by anyone who sees it.   The company I work for gives new employees a handbook and classes which explain to them that using the company name, logo, or other material in their personal Facebooks, Twitters, and blogs is not allowed.  Reason being, is that invariably someone will do something like that profanity-laced post or other undesirable behavior, which also mentions the company name.  Instant bad press.

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Madelaine McMasters wrote:

I've a friend who's fairly high up at one of the world's largest temporary employment agencies and he calls Facebook and Twitter ticking personal time bombs. I've also read that large companies are using Facebook as a way to weed out candidates, not weed them in. <snip>

My teen neighbor, who is a music major and has quite a foul mouth when he's angry or excited, has a remarkably clean Facebook page, and has told me that he's already seeing friends get blowback from both colleges and prospective employers for Facebook faux pas.

Like it or not, the internet does not distinguish between the public and private faces of its denizens.

Very true.  I listen to radio a lot and have heard the CEOs of two large companies state that part of their hiring process is to look at a prospective employee's Facebook.  One of the two is a techie herself - Kim Komando. (komando.com)  She owns the radio station over which she broadcasts, writes columns for various magazines, and is asked to troubleshoot new products by some of the top PC/software/tech companies, in addition to broadcasting her weekly radio program.  As a self-proclaimed techie geek who has worked in the industry her entire professional life, she warns her listeners regularly to make sure their FB is cleaned up *especially* prior to looking for a new job and has stated this has become the norm for many companies. 

 

 

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Celestiall Nightfire wrote

So, with all that said, a former employee who does
not
consider these factors, is better off gone.  Sorry, you don't like the reality of the situation.  

Your moral umbrage is duly noted.

Please note, that while I may even agree with his sentiment, I never said his tweet was a smart thing to do.  However, I am not going to pass a judgement on him as being someone who was not a good person to work for LL.  One thing I do see in his Tweet is that he was an Employee who actually cared. 

Sometimes caring about your company can be one of the most dangerous things an Employee can do.  Because the  Middle Managers over them don't like anything that may make them look bad.

 

 

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Perrie Juran wrote:


Celestiall Nightfire wrote

So, with all that said, a former employee who does
not
consider these factors, is better off gone.  Sorry, you don't like the reality of the situation.  

Your moral umbrage is duly noted.

Please note, that while I may even agree with his sentiment, I never said his tweet was a smart thing to do.  However, I am not going to pass a judgement on him as being someone who was not a good person to work for LL.  One thing I do see in his Tweet is that he was an Employee who actually cared. 

Sometimes caring about your company can be one of the most dangerous things an Employee can do.  Because the  Middle Managers over them don't like anything that may make them look bad. 

And in such situations, navigation skills are necessary, if not sufficient. For the same reason such caring can be dangerous within an organization, it can be dangerous during a job hunt. Middle managers won't hire anyone they think might eventually make them look bad.

ETA: I was lucky enough to grow up professionally within a company that cared and to reap the rewards that brings.

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Madelaine McMasters wrote:


Perrie Juran wrote:


Celestiall Nightfire wrote

So, with all that said, a former employee who does
not
consider these factors, is better off gone.  Sorry, you don't like the reality of the situation.  

Your moral umbrage is duly noted.

Please note, that while I may even agree with his sentiment, I never said his tweet was a smart thing to do.  However, I am not going to pass a judgement on him as being someone who was not a good person to work for LL.  One thing I do see in his Tweet is that he was an Employee who actually cared. 

Sometimes caring about your company can be one of the most dangerous things an Employee can do.  Because the  Middle Managers over them don't like anything that may make them look bad. 

And in such situations, navigation skills are necessary, if not sufficient. For the same reason such caring can be dangerous within an organization, it can be dangerous during a job hunt. Middle managers won't hire anyone they think might eventually make them look bad.

ETA: I was lucky enough to grow up professionally within a company that cared and to reap the rewards that brings.

I worked just shy of ten years for one company, working my way up thru the ranks.  The first 8 years I had a great manager but then after some reorganization (he got a big promotion) I got stuck with someone who micro managed us to death.  The final straw was when my Father passed away and I called to say I would be gone for several days.  He griped at me about having to cover my territory!

I jumped ship and went to work for one of their competitors.  After I was there a couple of years one day the VP took me aside.  He started telling me that I was a pain in the a$$.  For a moment I thought the hammer was going to fall.  But instead he said to me, "Keep it up, it keeps us all honest," and shook my hand.  That night I also received the company's award for Employee of the Year.

Sadly, several years later my job got replaced by the Internet.  In our field our company was one of the last to bite the dust.  My prior company, which was ten times the size, actually died two years before we did.

When I work for someone, I'm there to do a job, not play politics.  But I do know how to play them when it's needed.

 

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