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I kind of like your idea of getting away from what new users want SL to be and moving more in the direction of explaining what SL really is.

Everyone I know who has come here and stayed, including me, has spent a considerable amount of time just learning how things work, from the basics of movement to everything else. That requires an investment of personal time, and a pretty damned large one to start with. If Second Life is to remain the incredibly variable world it is, I don't see any way around that.

It's to be expected that there would be a great many more triers than stickers. This is NOT for everybody. It isn't like Facebook.

I think that the marketing should make that clear. There are plenty of people who not only don't mind spending time learning things, they actually enjoy doing that. Look in a mirror if you're reading this: you'll probably see one of those people.

Maybe the strategy should be to take advantage of that and to actually make it easier—when I joined the Help Island tutorials were okay for really basic stuff but once I left (which was just as soon as I passed the TP test) I pretty much had to resort to Google to find out more. It would make much more sense, I think, to have a multi-level starting place, one where you could be directed straight to more complex tutorials, ones about building and shopping and wearing and appearance, but also about how society works here: what clubs are all about, what private property means, stuff like that.

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Boudicca Littlebird wrote:

Time has no relation,people don't really like effort for a game they have to pay for

I disagree entirely.

Time is the basic, initial investment required of anyone joining SL. Because if nothing else, SL will occupy your time. The initial decision that everyone makes when first looking at SL is 'Do I want to spend time on this?'

Effort is the amount of work required between 'What is SL?' and that spark that happens when people realise they enjoy being a part of this community.

Both are absolutely necessary metrics if one wants to analyse the cause behind the lack of retention. There is an obvious correlation between Time [spent in-world] and Effort [required to stay in-world], with the example of a user who can't launch the SL viewer after signing up. Without useful, obvious help, how long are they going to spend trying to get SL to work? A user who has crossed the 'Effort' boundary and enjoys SL might spend hours (starting forum threads, getting answers, Googling likely causes, asking their SL friends), as opposed to a new user who will spend minutes (before deciding Farmville is easier). Just one example of Time vs. Effort in relation to retention.

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Hold on I need tea and a smoke, I have to think hard, one group of words vex me "SL friends" not sure what that is, if you met them in RL would you avoid them, where on the elitist scale is that, more than half way, don't know as I don't have any.

 

Sorry have to add this, retention is all about the feeling of self worth while they are in here and has nothing to do with time or effort. by them, but time and effort is required by us.

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Boudicca Littlebird wrote:

"SL friends" not sure what that is

I would rather keep the discussion on retention.

For your consideration: Friends and Partnering


Boudicca Littlebird wrote:

Sorry have to add this, retention is all about the feeling of self worth while they are in here and has nothing to do with time or effort. by them, but time and effort is required by us.

If you honestly think that it doesn't matter how much time or effort new users put into their SL experience before it starts being 'fun' for them, then I think we'll have to agree to disagree.

 

 

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But it is that way....

I can remember myself when I started SL. I heard about it and started out of curiosity. Sure, I first felt a little lost, but I had quite a good shape in mind what the whole thing is about. I was patient enough to read the instructions at the landing point and tried things myself. Just try and error, but it worked fine. When I came in a situation I couldn't solve by myself, I asked politly someone who looked experianced if they could tell me what I need to do, or if I couldn't find someone to ask I used google to help me.

I had no money, no already successfull friends or a special talent for turning waste into money. But I didn't begged, I didn't thought about being rude to others because they had it better, nor did I blame the program. Maybe thats cause I'm the type of user who first tries things themself instead of starting to rage. I see those type of user silently disapearing sadly......now everything should go easy, be for free and should be made in less then ten minutes...

And still, I'm friendly to newbies, if they are friendly to me. Once I explained to a female avatar very detailed how she can dance in the clubs (she asked in local chat and seemed to be lost). Well, I didn't got a single "thank you" from her. She didn't even think about the fact that I could keept partying instead of spending my time on helping her. And she is not the only one of that kind of newbie. I love to go to danceclubs and cause some of them are very growded many newbie avatars are passing by. I see it very often, that the run around like they may thing they are the only existing human being in the place. Ignoring advice from the hosts to step down from stage or simply running around and pushing others to the side, because they can't wait to let the place rezz or they simply don't care. And from time they begg for money. (Hey, did I complain about camping 20 Minutes for 3L when I was new?)

I'm always open to help the new, when they ask me in a friendly way and when they show patient and the will to learn. I'm not a snob and I still thank the people who helped me, but I also know that from nothing comes nothing.

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Boudicca Littlebird wrote:

You have to make it so people feel worth in here and that requires time and effort by those already in here not from them.

Material effort, sure. The existing userbase creates their clothes, toys, genitals and we pay tier for their wandering spaces. Compensation for this is usually in L$ form.

The effort and time I'm talking about is 'becoming comfortable'; consider Maslow's Pyramid of Needs. For every comfort there is a time and effort investment required by the user (this is mostly a model I'm using as an example, and not a true indication of the tasks required to reach 'fulfillment').

For basic needs they have to know how to use SL, where to find basic functions, how to talk and accomplish a 'look'.

For safety, they need to understand more cultural things such as how to avoid Griefers, where to go during a rolling restart, media/networking security including how to operate their Firewall and solve problems relating to their ability to stay logged in.

For affiliation/love, they need to find someone to spend time with. This usually also requires finding somewhere to find people.

And so on.

My point is that these tasks may well involve other peoples' work and effort, but the effect on the new user is obvious too. It takes time and effort to learn where the camera controls are located. Time and effort required to learn how to build. To find stores that sell clothes they like. Etc, etc, etc.

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@Rodvik

 

I am ancient and barely remember my first steps. But I do remember why I initially stayed. I met a very fun avatar and we had a blast learning and teaching each other all things SL. I doubt I would have 'stuck' without her help/friendship.

 

So my idea to save SL and fill the world with millions of noobs?

 

The Noob Buddy System. Drop noobs in world in groups. Force them to interact, even, (perhaps)force friendship. Anything that raises the possibility of meeting like noob minds. Learning the world together is a big part of the magic.

 

If there are any stats on the "First Land" program, I think you'll see the same sticky friendship pattern.

((I would actually interested in helping with such a plan. Call me!))

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Charolotte
Caxton
wrote
:


1
.
Give
everyone
a
home

2
.
Let
everyone
choose
any
name
they
want

3
.
Give
them
a
starting
allowance

 

I agree, but I would add a few things.  First, I want to comment on what you said.  All three of these are very good ideas, and I think that they would help a lot.  The name issue is particularly irksome.  I don't think any residents like usernames, particularly since all the reasonable ones were long since exhausted.  There has been an enormous, continuous outpouring of user dissatisfaction with the current name situation, which LL continues to ignore.  I can't understand why LL continues to do something that is so unpopular when there would be no ongoing cost to change it, only a one-time development cost.  I'm not going to go on any more about this here, since there are hundreds of pages of resident complaints and suggested solutions available already.  Suffice it to say that going through a frustrating experience of trying variou s usernames, finally giving up and choosing one like 123rstvq10, and only later finding out that it is displayed over one's head and that it can never be changed does not make for the most pleasant introduction to SL.

Free introductory accounts are essential; I would have never tried SL if I had had to pay to sample it.  What about giving people a premium account for free for the first couple of months?  Access to chat support would really ease their introduction, and it includes two of Charolotte's suggestions.

What I think the biggest issue are is decreasing as much as possible how much people have to learn to have a good experience and making it easy for them to learn what they need.  Having the now defunct basic and advanced viewer modes was an attempt to address this. It was a good idea, but the execution was abysmal.  It seemed to me as though it was developed by people who did not understand SL.  The problem was that basic mode was so limited that one could not use it and have a good experience.  For example, one of the first things many new residents want to do is change the appearance of their avatar, but that was not possible with basic mode.  Another problem with it was that there were only two modes, and at least three are needed:  basic, allowing access to the simplest combination of menus that will yield a good experience; standard, displaying menus that will allow most people to do most things they want to (LL could determine this by recording what features are used by most people); and advanced, with access to everything.  Finally, it should not be necessary to log off to change modes.

Here is a perfect example of what is not right:  It's a common problem for an avatar to fail to rez and remain a cloud.  The quickest, surest cure is "character test," which is accessed by drilling down through multiple levels of the Develop menu, which is not even visible by default.  Everyone needs this, yet it's buried in a place where it's hard to find and labeled in a way that would lead no one to suspect that it is the fix for a common problem.  It should be on the Me menu, with a label like, "Rez Avatar," or something similar.

A real effort should be made to decrease the level of technical sophistication needed to enjoy SL.  I suspect than most longtime residents are, at least, at a level such that their friends and relatives go to them for answers to questions about computing.  There is a huge number of people who would enjoy SL that do not have the level of technical competence needed as it currently stands.  Having multiple viewer modes is part of the answer to this.  Also, if I were in Rodvik's place, I would be looking hard at how I could simplify some of the things people need to do to improve their experience.  For example, the program does not do a good job of setting graphics preferences, and some of the settings are incomprehensible to most people.  Surely it could do better.  It could even have an automatic mode in which it changes them on the fly according to conditions.  There must be a huge number of arty, creative, non-technical people who would enjoy SL if it were less technically demanding.

Another example that I have encountered recently is the need to make alpha masks.  With Lighting and Shadows, which are needed for the best visual experience, on, invisiprims, upon which many shoes rely not to have an ugly, distorted foot sticking through, are broken.  If one wants to wear those shoes and look good, one must make (Generic ones don't usually work well.) alpha masks.  Often, the alpha masks, which are so necessary with mesh clothing, that makers of mesh clothing supply have problems, so one needs to make one's own.  What percentage of the population has or can easily acquire the skills and software necessary to make them?

As others have said, access to mentoring can really smooth the first few hours, days, and weeks in SL.  Could LL be much more active in promoting mentoring?  Could people be recognized and rewarded for it?  Could LL promote good mentoring venues, informing new residents about them?  Could LL subsidize mentoring venues, perhaps letting selected ones have reduced or free tier?  

Finally, the TOS.  I doubt that it's responsible for losing many recruits because they all just click through without reading it, but its complexity and length are symptomatic.  The last time I looked, a year or two ago, it was twenty or so single-spaced pages.  For most users, SL is recreation---it had better be because somebody must buy Lindens with RL money in order for the minority of users for whom it is business to take RL money out.  Twenty pages of legalese just does not fit anywhere within my definition of recreation.

In summary, Rodvik, make it easier for people to enjoy SL, and either listen to residents or have developers who actually use SL.

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Alisha Matova wrote:

@Rodvik

 

I am ancient and barely remember my first steps. But I do remember why I initially stayed. I met a very fun avatar and we had a blast learning and teaching each other all things SL. I doubt I would have 'stuck' without her help/friendship.

 

So my idea to save SL and fill the world with millions of noobs?

 

The Noob Buddy System. Drop noobs in world in groups. Force them to interact, even, (perhaps)force friendship. Anything that raises the possibility of meeting like noob minds. Learning the world together is a big part of the magic.

 

If there are any stats on the "First Land" program, I think you'll see the same sticky friendship pattern.

((I would actually interested in helping with such a plan. Call me!))

This is  what I was thinking also.  I would add that when they sign up, have multiple options for them to choose one primary interest to start, drop them in a group dealing with that.  When I first started, it too was because of someone I met to share things along the way...if I had been left on my own, I don't think I would have lasted the week :(

ETA:  There should be groups formed, sanctioned by LL,  comprised of people who want to help in those specific areas.  Noobs should be released from these starter groups after a certain amount of log in time to make room for others to follow.

 

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I just posted my first ever post at SLU.  Almost amazing because I signed up there back in 2009.

But at the risk of being redundant and also at the risk of repeating things that others have already said, this is what I posted:

@Rod

My guess as to the biggest overall reason that people don't stay is that the huge majority want instant gratification and simply put that is a difficult thing to fulfill in SL.  People also want structure because they find security or safety in it, and again, that is a difficult thing to fulfill in SL.  People want either consciously or sub consciously be directed what to do.  Because of this there are going to be a huge number of people who no matter what you do, they are not going to stay. 

You've asked us "What can we do to improve retention?"  Perhaps a better question would be to ask us "Why did you stay?" and build on that.  Your question almost smacks of seeking the same instant gratification that the people who did not stay were looking for.

When I first started SL in 2007 I already perceived my computer and the internet as a social tool.  So that was already in my mind set when I started.

My computer at that time had a 500mhz processor with 512MB ram, integrated graphics, and I had a 1mb Internet connection. Talk about lag! For the life of me I still don't know how I made it through orientation.  But I made it through and wound up at the info hubs.

Perhaps I was fortunate.  I was already used to instant messaging ala MSN and Yahoo.  So I started chatting with people.  I started asking them to take me to their favorite place in SL.  Not just give me a LM, but take me there and show it to me. 

And again, perhaps I was fortunate.  I made friends with some users who were not much older than me but were marveling like I was at the World we had found.  We went clubbing together, explored together, shopped IN WORLD together, had pixel sex, really did In World the same things we did in RL. 

If you think that 'game-ifying' SL is going to help retain more users I think you are wrong.  While Linden Realms may help new users learn to navigate it still ignores the major thing SL is, a social platform.

So moving forward I see several things, some of them all ready touched upon here but I will still repeat them, that need to be done.

FIRST AND FOREMOST, make chat obvious in the viewer!  Not obnoxious but obvious.  After using TPV's for several years I recently installed the official viewer.  And damn if I didn't have to go look up how chat worked.  I'm over five years in SL and I had to go look it up? WTF? 

When you log into Facebook for the first time it is immediately obvious where you post your comments. There is no guess work to it.  I couldn't ask any one In World how chat worked because I couldn't find it to use it!

Second, invest the man hours necessary to cleaning up and keeping clean the info hubs and allocate extra resources to them server side so that server side lag is minimized.

Thirdly, Mainland.  You have SIM's being held hostage by people who have no interest in SL beyond financial with exorbitantly priced micro parcels.  Just like LL can step in and 'freeze' the Lindex if things get wonky, The Lab needs to step in and do something about this problem also.  Because it really is an abuse of resources and it detours people from investing in Mainland and making better use of it.

Fourth, bring back the discounts for Non Profits.  You are missing out on a big return on investment there.  Also, work closer with those who are successful here.  I'm still shocked that Elven Worlds was allowed to just walk away from SL, their complaints apparently completely ignored by LL.  If you want to retain people you also have to work with them.

Fifth, quit trying to pretend that adult activities don't occur here.  While maybe you don't want to emphasize them, quit trying to hide them.

In closing, SL retains a certain type of person.  I believe among our common attributes, we are stubborn, sometimes rambunctious, tend to be rebellious and go against the status quo. We are imaginative and inventive. People who do not have these qualities are not as likely to stick around.  If all they want is a pre-thought world to play in occasionally, they are not going to stick around because that is not what SL is about.

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Depends on the person. I have been here for 4 years come August and the "worth it" is something I made myself.

Given the nature of SL and the open ended nature of an engrossing SL experience, a user that sticks around is someone who is likely to do a lot of things themselves as well as experience others work, time and effort.

Someone who thinks SL is any one thing  (which is what I find a lot of new users tend to do) for example, treat SL as only a role play game (then move on to a better MMORPG) never realizing SL has a lot more to offer, do not stay long.

Personally, I have stuck around because I found friends in community (in lots of different aspects of SL) and found stuff I like to do in SL like build, DJ, and random TP, lol.

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Innula Zenovka wrote:


Irene Muni wrote:


Koltari wrote:

Shouldn't he be asking the question on this forum?

Totally agree.

If Rodvik
wants to know the
opinion
of the Residents of
SL
,
SL
has
enough tools
.
I can not imagine
to
Google
asking
users
through a
private forum
about
Google.

I'm sorry, but I don't agree.   Someone had started a thread there about "if you were a Linden, what job would you like and why?" and that turned into "What do you think the CEO should do?" and Rodvik joined in at that point.   

To my mind, there's nothing wrong with Rodvik responding to posts in a large and active external forum (certainly larger and more active than this forum) where many of his customers discuss his company and his product, particularly since there's a lot of regulars there who no longer post here, for whatever reason, and where those of us who post in both places sometimes feel we can more frank than can we be here.

 

 

I was aware it was a thread started by someone else but I am still puzzeled if he really cared to get proper feedback to his question he'd also post it here (SL official forum)..if this is something he actually does wonder about and wasn't just bored at work browsing forums. I was done using external forum when I was way to seriously into some mmo a few years ago. It really shouldn't be necessary to go to one, or twitter for that matter, to read input/feeback or whatever from LL.

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I'm disappointed that Rodvik spends his time on a third party site, but I will answer his question from here in the Official Second Life  forums.

 

@Rodvik - I think most new sign-ups do not stick around because their computers simply can't run Second Life very well or not at all.  So many people now days have off the shelf laptops from their local Best Buy.  If you want more people to stick around then you must tackle this problem with the viewer and make it work well with lower end computers.   Go to your local electronics retailer and buy some low to mid-ranged laptops and make your employees work on getting SL to run on those machines.  

Also you really need to tackle the cost of running your business so the price of land tier can go down.  People are used to only paying about  10 -15 dollars per month for their online games.  A linden home or a tiny parcel on mainland just isn't going to cut it for many.  The creative people that come to Second Life get put off by the high tier too because the cost of having a decent sized amount of land to keep a persistent build for their creations costs way too much for many of them.  

 

PS -  I think it is great that you want input from current residents, but judging by many of the responses, I doubt you will be getting many suggestions that will be disruptive enough to achieve what you want.  The residents are set in their ways and won't put up with much disrupting of their second lives and will be satisfied if that means the population stays the same and does not grow.  

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I basicly agree.

1. A "home point". A safe location for every new resident to logg in and logg out with as much privacy as a normal house can offer. Not too big to damage the housemarket, but not to tiny to be unattractiv. Maybe a single room. And all new residens will have a folder in their inventory with a few basic furniture objects.

2. A better guide to the necessary things and where they can be found. An introducion video, showing an example for the first week in an avatars life covering up the basic problems and questions. Just short, easy to understand and complete.

3. A friendship program for those who want to teach and those who want to learn. Supported from LL with benefits for both sides. Newbies who look for someone who takes their hands and show them around and experianced users who like to help and share their knowledge and interests.

4. Starting informations which go further than just introductions about how to move.

 

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16 wrote:

here is the question asked by rodvik linden over on SLU: (i am paraphrase it here)

"how do you think we can get newbies to stick?

we have tried all kinds of things, incentives, whatevs. nothing works for the stickable quantities we as a company would like. we can easy sign them up in the 1000s. millions even. we can get them inworld. but only a tiny number of them ever stick.

i would be interested in hearing what people have to suggest in helping with this?"

Keep track of them and make them feel special. Do the former unobtrusively and lightly and the latter uniformly.

Each time they log in no matter if it's six months apart, a pop up invites them to go and do or explore something. Once they get there, it's a learning experience as well as fun.

The biggest question I hear from 'newbies' is "what do I do here?" People aren't used to working for their entertainment, which is how most view Second Life at least initially.

Linden Realms is the right idea but poorly implemented from a newbie's point of view. I know because I brought a newbie all over the place (one I know in real life.) They said they didn't "get it." They're intelligent; that wasn't the problem. They really, really loved Bentham - the quests there. They don't play WoW or anything, so it isn't that; but they liked having something tangible to 'do.' 

Everyone wants to feel special. Everyone wants to feel useful. Notice I said 'feel' because by definition not everyone can be special and not everyone will be equally useful, but people want to feel that way. What people don't want to feel, usually, is adrift. Logging in without a clear path makes many newbies feel adrift and they quit.

Many newbies also quit because Second Life is 'too hard.' I think some way to go through the learning process that isn't all at once and is not so sterile-looking is good. That's why I said break it up into different times and places. When you first join you just want to get going. So teach them how to walk and fly and set them loose.

But the next time they log in - invite them somewhere fun and special. I think SL needs more Lab-built places that have 'stuff to do' and also require slowly learning how to navigate Second Life. Make a game of it, in other words. Be snarky. Be fun. It's much easier to remember a lesson if you had fun learning it - so much fun you didn't realize you were learning.

Hate to say it but most newbies need some helping along. Once they have tasted what is possible here and feel 'yes I can' they will begin taking those tentative baby steps. And it won't be a world of shoppers and drifters. I'm not saying that's bad - but it is not going to get the result I think SL was created for originally. 

I hope that made some type of sense...I rarely edit forum posts because I think spontaneous is best, and also because I'm not being graded or paid.  :)

You gotta lock 'em in somehow though. I think the reason so many residents have health or other issues that keep them logging in anyway despite the difficulty of navigation in the beginning, is because there is nothing to compel them otherwise. So mainly those who really need this venue for one reason or another from real life, whether to escape it, augment it, are the ones who stay. (Mainly.)

 

 

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Once upon a time, there was a group called SL Mentors. We manned Help Island where new residents arrived. We were able to point them to quality places to fix up their avatar for little or no cost. We also suggest new resident friendly places, like NCI, for classes on what you needed to know in SL. LL, in their infinite wisdom, decided to disband this group as well as eliminate the private welcome centers that had been set up, including ones in German, Japanese, Italian, just to name a few, and did nothing to fill that void.

 

I currently, at my own expense, maintain a folder with good clothing, a decent skin, and landmarks to new resident friendly places that I hand out to new residents that I meet. It includes instruction notecards on how to rez a box to open it up and retrieve the contents, how to change your clothing, including covering the different layers and their symbols, how to cease being a cloud, etc. These are for female residents, unfortunately, since I haven't been able to find decent male stuff.

 

I would love to see retention numbers from when the mentors were functioning compared with now.

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I think another resident helping a newbie is all well and good but the real fun has to come from the world itself, from the newbie's experience of it. Outfitting their avatar and learning to walk are just tiny parts of that experience.

Once they've done that, it's the world itself they don't seem to 'get' - the purpose of it. If they don't make friends quickly in world, I mean ones that have all the time in the world for them, which someone who helps lots of newbies wouldn't probably have - or if they're looking more for things they can do on their own - they will get bored and quit.

I think one reason there are such high numbers into adult 'activities' in SL, aside from the obvious, is that it is something 'to do.' (Or 'someone,' I can hear Dres saying...)

No but seriously, that and 'how do I get money and a house' are the biggest things I hear from newbies. Maybe the Lab could build high rises, (like tiny beehive rooms stacked high, place for them to 'feel at home' in) I dunno. Of course that would put my place out of 'business' but then, I'd be paying less tier. Lol

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Bobbie Faulds wrote:

Once upon a time, there was a group called SL Mentors. We manned Help Island where new residents arrived. We were able to point them to quality places to fix up their avatar for little or no cost. We also suggest new resident friendly places, like NCI, for classes on what you needed to know in SL. LL, in their infinite wisdom, decided to disband this group as well as eliminate the private welcome centers that had been set up, including ones in German, Japanese, Italian, just to name a few, and did nothing to fill that void.

 

I currently, at my own expense, maintain a folder with good clothing, a decent skin, and landmarks to new resident friendly places that I hand out to new residents that I meet. It includes instruction notecards on how to rez a box to open it up and retrieve the contents, how to change your clothing, including covering the different layers and their symbols, how to cease being a cloud, etc. These are for female residents, unfortunately, since I haven't been able to find decent male stuff.

 

I would love to see retention numbers from when the mentors were functioning compared with now.

Hi Bobbie, yes, I remember that from way back when and was saddened that an avenue was lost to new people coming aboard.

Agree with you on wanting to know the comparison between now and then.  For all we know, the retention of people has always been a problem, it might not be something new.  I believe they are worried because they've noticed revenue has dropped for them, but I don't believe it's from lower retention...it's from the way they have run things as a company, people are fed up and dropping out...people who have been here a long time.  I myself spend next to nothing like I used to because of this :(  Sad....

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I think it goes past that - I agree it's always been a small percentage who stick around for a while. But I think part of the reason they are asking about this now might be that if they don't begin to get a sizeable group of newbies or steadily increase numbers, then as the first responders die out, so will Second Life. Maybe it's an indication they are more open to re-imagining Second Life a bit, from the totally open-ended, almost government less space it began as, from the social experiment, to something - no word really fits. More...Structured? Stable? With a steel grid under the grid? The steel grid being...a structure newbies would have more hints about?

/sighs and gives up trying to communicate, for now

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An interesting thread.

I would like to help more but my problem is that I'm not here much now. It's ok to say be active on the forums or the wiki but I'd been here for almost 18 months before I'd even heard of them and when I did enter, it wasn't the best decision I ever made.

Maybe I'll get inspired. I have land that I insist on paying for even though I login less than once a week these days. Maybe I should take what time I am inworld to make it something useful. Let's see if I have the time or the patience, but I like the idea.

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Irene Muni wrote:


Koltari wrote:

Shouldn't he be asking the question on this forum?

Totally agree.

If Rodvik
wants to know the
opinion
of the Residents of
SL
,
SL
has
enough tools
.
I can not imagine
to
Google
asking
users
through a
private forum
about
Google.

Knowing how LL have acted in the past, even with scant or non-existant information and the careful way in which they use their own blog, I believe that Rodvik avoids posting his "thoughts and musings" on Company sites due to the danger of them being construed as "policy." 

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Back.

Another thing people want is hierarchy. I don't mean fascism. I don't mean any one thing. But the reason there is no such thing as real anarchy anywhere on earth is because some sort of order always replaces it. Why? Because people crave some sort of order. 

Even lone wolves relate to the pack even if it's only to the negative space between themselves and the pack.

And within the pack each one wants to know they have a place in it. And if they progress they want some sort of marker. Look how many places award markers of some sort. Certificate. Trophy. Whatever you want to call it. It's a place marker in the progression of that person's life.

Second Life has no yearbook, no history book, nothing - so why should people expend energy into the void? No one wants to die.

 

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