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Blender: How to stitch multiple vertices in UVMap ?


Gael Streeter
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Hi everybody,

this is an issue I am facing to for long and I hope there is a quite easy solution because I really need one... lol

I have a mesh I already unwrapped and textured. I used and applied the Subdivision Surface modifier and I try now to reduce the vertices number a bit. So I deleted one loop. But when I delete a loop, I have after a gap between my vertices (which are doubled) in my UVMap and a seam appears when I look at my textured mesh. So I would like to stitch the vertices to remove this gap but I do not know how (without doing it one vertice by one vertice...).

UVMap1.JPG

I use Blender 2.62 and tried the "Stitch" feature. But I should not use it correctly as it does not do what I want...
I also tried Blender 2.63 and the "Dissolve" feature but the result is not better...

Do you know a good solution to my problem ?
Do I use badly the "Stitch" feature ?

Thanks.

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Have you tried weld?

Select the veticies opposite of eachother and hit W to weld them together, not sure if you can do them all at once but worth a try . One set at a time/ Slow Pain in the arse

 

I pretty much try to stay away from the subsurf modifier. It ads way too many verticies. to the whole model

You can just add loopcuts to the sections you need more detail rather than subsurfing the whole model

 

You can also Use the decimate modifier to reduce the verticies or meshlab is an awesome tool to reduce your poly count without destoying quality of the model. Deleting loop cuts on the UV map may give some seriously undesired results

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TY Dilbert for your answer.

Unfortunately the "Weld" feature merges all the selected points in one. So I would need to weld the points one by one manually and as I have thousands of points to "weld" that is the solution that I would like to avoid...
What I would need is a "Clever Weld" feature which would merge the points that correspond to the same mesh vertice together.

What I do not understand is that the "Stitch" feature seems to be normally done for that... I found this doc on the Blender site which shows a sample of use of the "Stitch" feature corresponding to my need. But in my case, it does very strange things... :matte-motes-crying:

http://www.blender.org/development/release-logs/blender-233/uv-editor-image-window/

uvs_limit_stitch_01.png

Any other idea ?

 

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If you used the subsurf alot on your model. then seriously think about using meshlab to crunch the polys down. it does an awesome job and keeps the topology of the object in tact . There is the decimate modifier in blender. but it doesnt do as good of job as meshlab

 

But staying away from the subsurf is good. You can select areas you need more detail in edit mode and then subdivide that particular spot you need high detail

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Hi , perhaps this is what u want ? :

The first image shows the UV map after the edge loop has been removed from the mesh, note where to find the Last Operator panel at the bottom of the Mesh Tools panel.

image 1.png

 

Second image shows the UV map after Stiching ( V ), note the Last Operator panel now shows stiching options image 2.png

 

Third image shows what happens when the Snap Islands check box is Unchecked

image 3.png

You could also try setting the Limits and checking Use Limits check box

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Don't delete the edge loops in the first place. Instead, select the edge loops in edge select mode, then use Mesh->Dissolve->Dissolve, then switch to vertex select mode and do Mesh->Dissolve->Dissolve again to dissolve the vertices. This will leave your UV map intact. No need to stich or weld anything. You can do multiple edge loops at the same time. This is what finally made me switch to 2.63 from good old 2.49b.

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From the looks of the Op's images of their UV MAP. it has a lot of wrinkle or wavy detail . How much would "disolve" affect the topology?. Will it distort the higher and lower points?

It seems to me if they disolve too much without adding triangles and such to to keep the wrinkled or wavy affect, it would become distorted

 

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Yes, of course it will reduce the detail, exactly the same as deleting loops and stitching will. It achieves the identical result, but doing it via the ngons in the middle step avoids ruining the UV map. If you leave the vertices there, you will not lose any detail, but you won't save any triangles either, as the ngons will be triangulated during export-upload.

In my picture, it's all over the plane, to show that you can do it all at once. You don't have to do it all. You can do just the loops you think are redundant. That makes it very different from the decimate modifier.

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I just think if the OP wanted a lower poly count they may think about staying away from the subsuf modifier and  just use subdivide on selected areas to increase verticies where needed instead of doing the whole model and use loop cuts where needed  .. Otherwise they are going to have to use something to crunch the polys down and ad tris or quads where needed. Doing it by hand would be murder of course. It just dpends on what they are making i guess. But starting the modeling process with power poly in mind works out pretty well for SL Not exactly sure how they did it all but it is just a suggestion

I have found that not using the subsurf versus using subdivide and putting my edges and loops where I want them exactly where I need the detail greatly reduces the count. and has great quality. using setsmooth pretty much takes care of smothing except where detail is needed.

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I agree, but Dissovle changes it from murder to a  misdemeanour. :matte-motes-smile:

It's good for making the lower LODs if you like to start at high or medium, which I do, but you still absolutely have to think ahead so that know which loops you are going to remove and which you need to keep. You can use it on subdivided areas too, to refine the result.

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Hehe yea I love it. I made a table and had to extrude the legs. I had to subdivite the tabe a couple of times to get the amount of faces i needed to then zoom in and subdivite the corner areas for the legs. After making the legs, I used disolve on everything but the legs. Very nice feature

Perfect for the flat surfaces for sure.

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I've been pinning my uv setup after removing edge loops and then reprojecting the uvs in place. This works maybe 80 percent of the time.  Drongle's "dissolve" solution is magnificent and Aquila's post has really helped me greatly with a fussy uv stitching system.

I found  the stiching function hard to grasp but I discovered I could shift-select green dots that would attach parts I didn't want to  to stich to "release" them from the calculation.  I havent found a way to the "limit selection" function via rolling the middle mouse button.  I'm going to find that stiching menu and see if it helps..I'm guessing it will!

Excellent thread.  Thank you all.

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Woooowwww Wooooowwww !!! Thank very much Drongle !!!

Your method worked perfectly ! Here is the result:

UVMap2.JPG

Pfiuuuuu !!! This is a big progress for me ! :matte-motes-big-grin:

Thank you again Drongle for your precious help ! And thank you the 2.63 and the BMesh ! :matte-motes-wink:

PS: I do not know why but the "Stitch" method did not want to work well on my case. Perhaps because my loop was splitted in parts on my UVMap...

 

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I was looking for something on redirecting edgeloops and came across this video 

. Ok Drongle has already explained how to use Dissolve but what i found interesting was at 1:50 secs , how to create a temporary keyboard shortcut. In the past i have had 100's of Merge , Merge at Last's to do. Now i can replace Merge, Merge at Last with a LMB ( for example )

I hope some of you will find this usefull to know aswell

 

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You can make that shortcut permanent by either pressing CTL U to add it to your default set up (be sure to clear the scene or everything will appear in your default set up next time you load blender)...or save via the "Export key configuration"...you can load different key combinations sets at any time.

For merging a series of verts I make good use of Shift-R which repeats the last action. 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I'm going to go ahead and necro post here because this little tip from Drongle is -extremely- useful. I only wish I had found it before I started removing edge loops from my current project early on. Dissolve is the way to go... and is -certainly- and excellent reason for bumping to 2.63! (I was already on 2.62, but went ahead and dove into the 2.64 test build purely to get access to Dissolve. My oh my what headaches this would have save me as I uvmapped the early parts of this project!)

Thanks, Drongle!

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For anyone who is interested, in 3ds max you can do what Drongle described by selecting a loop or ring and instead of "delete", right click the screen and select "remove". If you hold ctrl while doing so, you will remove the vertices aswell.

I didn't test it, but I think the dissolve (Blender) or remove ( 3ds max) will leave your UV map intact and the other way described by deleting and stitching will not. So if you are removing geometry for lower LoDs it will save a lot of time redoing the UV.

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Kwakkelde Kwak wrote:

I didn't test it, but I think the dissolve (Blender) or remove ( 3ds max) will leave your UV map intact and the other way described by deleting and stitching will not. So if you are removing geometry for lower LoDs it will save a lot of time redoing the UV.

Dissolve in Blender does leave the UVs unharmed. If a person is using Blender 2.63 and above, he should use "dissolve" instead of the old delete -> edge loops function. The side benefit is that you can remove multiple edge loops at once with dissolve. You can't do that with  delete -> edge loops.

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