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3 minutes ago, Pamela Galli said:

Wondering if mods consider this thread OT?

It was until today. I'll endeavor to give LL the attention they desire from now on. I am both a believer in and a purveyor of unintended consequences.

Edited by Madelaine McMasters
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On 15th April 1989, 96 football fans went to a game and never came home. Their murder became one of the biggest cover-ups this country has ever seen https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillsborough_dis

Today on 5-01-1931, Herbert Hoover dedicated the Empire State Building. Soon after,a giant Primate engages in shenanigans atop a neighboring building........ sort-of.....

June 14th 2012 - “The Bourne Identity,” featuring famous Mini chase scene, is released... In one of the most memorable scenes in the film “The Bourne Identity,” released on this day in 2002, the am

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22 minutes ago, Ivanova Shostakovich said:

   We lost Elvis, forty years ago. Of course, I don't remember the event. I was eleven. 

I remember my mom being really, really sad about it.  She played nothing but Elvis records for a week straight.

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On ‎7‎/‎27‎/‎2017 at 11:40 AM, LittleMe Jewell said:

There have been a whole lot of cartoon characters, but I don't think I like any of them more than Bugs. One of his best was "Duck Season", co-starring Elmer and Daffy, but he's so consistently funny, sardonic, and mostly unflappable that he's hard to resist.

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On this day in 1939 the original version of The Wizard of Oz debuted.  Notable for its use of Technicolor, fantasy storytelling, musical score, and memorable characters, it has become an icon of American popular culture. It was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture, but lost to Gone with the Wind. It did win in two other categories, including Best Original Song for "Over the Rainbow" and Best Original Score by Herbert Stothart. The 1956 broadcast television premiere of the film on the CBS network reintroduced the film to the wider public and eventually made the presentation an annual tradition, making it one of the best known films in movie history.

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10-8-2018 The Salt Lake City Police Department shoots everyone in the city. The police chief then tweets "Being a cop in Salt Lake City is the scariest situation our police officers have ever been in". A district attorney flown in from Moab finds the fears justified and does not pursue charges.

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10-22-2018    Advertising-free TV network HenHouse News (HHN) begins operations. Staffed entirely by women who'd been sexually harassed or assaulted by Roger Ailes, Bill O'Reilly and other Fox News male senior staff, the fledgling network is able to forego ad revenue by relying on a recurring stream of funds from civil lawsuits and out-of-court settlements.

In their debut broadcast, the network reveals the upcoming launch of Wine Stain Entertainment (WSE), a not-for-profit movie studio co-op offering free studio space and expert guidance for aspiring female producers, directors, writers, actors and theatrical support personnel. Funding for the studio is to be provided by a recurring stream of funds from civil lawsuits and out-of-court settlements awarded to co-op members, consisting of virtually every female in Hollywood.

WSE's first project will be "MeToo.com", a documentary detailing the birth of the female run Silicon Valley company funded entirely by a recurring stream of funds from civil lawsuits and out-of-court settlements awarded to company employees by countless male Silicon Valley C-Level executives.

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1988 Stealth Bomber Unveiled

In the presence of members of Congress and the media, the Northrop B-2 “stealth” bomber is shown publicly for the first time at Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California.

The aircraft, which was developed in great secrecy for nearly a decade, was designed with stealth characteristics that would allow it to penetrate an enemy’s most sophisticated defenses unnoticed. At the time of its public unveiling, the B-2 had not even been flown on a test flight. It rapidly came under fire for its massive cost–more than $40 billion for development and a $1 billion price tag for each unit.

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12-6-2019    Website "seducation.com" opens for business, allowing powerful businessmen to masquerade as pubescent boys to attract the attention of randy female high school teachers. "It's a match made in homeroom" stated MDM.com CEO Heather Mowns. "We're taking two kinds of sexual predators off the street with one simulated classroom environment". Not content to bask in the glow of her company's grand opening, Mowns is already planning "sexual-congress.com", a similarly themed social gathering space to connect powerful public officials with starry eyed constituents.

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On ‎9‎/‎26‎/‎2017 at 1:15 PM, cykarushb said:

This was the closest we ever came to nuclear war

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1983_Soviet_nuclear_false_alarm_incident

Sometimes I just don't pay attention the way I should. If I'd kept up with this thread properly I'd have seen this back in September. As it happens, this year I read about an incident that happened in October. October of 1962, right smack dab in the middle of the Cuban Missile Crisis which in and of itself is by far the closest I thought we got to a nuclear war. Truly, you had to have 'been there' (as in those times) to understand that. We lived with that *****. Every. Single. Day. Not just Cuba—the whole Cold War. Years. Decades, even. You can imagine how pleased I was to recently and suddenly be plunged back into that mode.

Sorry. I digress. There was massive tension when the US learned (or publicly revealed we'd learned) that the Russians were deploying nuclear missiles in Cuba, 90 miles from the nearest American soil. We blockaded the island. A Soviet sub that was there before the isotopes hit the fan saw some American ships coming its way and submerged, per normal orders. It was spotted, either visually or otherwise, and the ships started trying to force it to the surface, using depth charges. What made this an issue is that the sub had one nuclear-tipped torpedo. Had it been used against an American ship it would be an obvious first strike. One man prevented that launch from happening.  He was a 34 year old officer on that sub: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/03/you-and-almost-everyone-you-know-owe-your-life-to-this-man/

So that's twice one a them Rooskies stopped Armageddon. Spasibo, tovarisches.

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7 December 1972 • The crew of Apollo 17, the last manned mission to the moon, lifts off at Cape Canaveral, Florida.
7 December 1995 • Galileo spacecraft arrives at Jupiter after a 6-year journey.

Oh, and on the 6 December 2017 Finland celebrated its 100 years of independence.
All over the world about 50 buildings and scenes were lit with blue and white colours (the colours of the Finnish flag).
Among others, Niagara Falls and the Colosseum in Rome were lit like this too.
Congratulations Finland!

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12-7-1941 Pearl Harbor bombed

At 7:55 a.m. Hawaii time, a Japanese dive bomber bearing the red symbol of the Rising Sun of Japan on its wings appears out of the clouds above the island of Oahu. A swarm of 360 Japanese warplanes followed, descending on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor in a ferocious assault. The surprise attack struck a critical blow against the U.S. Pacific fleet and drew the United States irrevocably into World War II.

With diplomatic negotiations with Japan breaking down, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his advisers knew that an imminent Japanese attack was probable, but nothing had been done to increase security at the important naval base at Pearl Harbor. It was Sunday morning, and many military personnel had been given passes to attend religious services off base. At 7:02 a.m., two radar operators spotted large groups of aircraft in flight toward the island from the north, but, with a flight of B-17s expected from the United States at the time, they were told to sound no alarm. Thus, the Japanese air assault came as a devastating surprise to the naval base.

Much of the Pacific fleet was rendered useless: Five of eight battleships, three destroyers, and seven other ships were sunk or severely damaged, and more than 200 aircraft were destroyed. A total of 2,400 Americans were killed and 1,200 were wounded, many while valiantly attempting to repulse the attack. Japan’s losses were some 30 planes, five midget submarines, and fewer than 100 men. Fortunately for the United States, all three Pacific fleet carriers were out at sea on training maneuvers. These giant aircraft carriers would have their revenge against Japan six months later at the Battle of Midway, reversing the tide against the previously invincible Japanese navy in a spectacular victory.

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